DiversityNursing Blog

FDA Approves ADHD Drug to Treat Binge Eating

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Feb 02, 2015 @ 12:04 PM

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of an attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug to treat binge eating.

Should ADHD medication be prescribed to help cut compulsive overeating?

The drug, Vyvanse, is usually used for ADHD but it's been shown to help control binge-eating disorder, the FDA said.

"In binge-eating disorder, patients have recurrent episodes of compulsive overeating during which they consume larger amounts of food than normal and experience the sense that they lack control. Patients with this condition eat when they are not hungry and often eat to the point of being uncomfortably full," the FDA said in a statement.

"Patients may feel ashamed and embarrassed by how much they are eating, which can result in social isolation. Binge-eating disorder may lead to weight gain and to health problems related to obesity."

The drug is not approved for weight loss, and it's a Schedule II controlled substance because it has high potential for abuse and dependence. But any doctor can write a prescription for any approved drug for any use he or she sees fit.

"The concern in our country especially is the desperation to lose weight," said NBC's diet and nutrition editor Madelyn Fernstrom. "Everyone will say, 'Oh, I have binge eating disorder'. I think there's a huge potential for abuse in our country."

Source: www.nbcnews.com

Topics: FDA, weight, ADHD, prescription, prescribed, binge eating, overeating, disorder, health problems, health, healthcare, medication, patients, medicine

Many Kids Don't Have A Realistic Take On Their Weight

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jul 28, 2014 @ 01:05 PM

By Michelle Healy

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Nearly one-third of U.S. children and adolescents are obese or overweight, but many don't realize that they fall into that category.

According to new government statistics, approximately 30% of children and adolescents ages 8-15 years (32% of boys and 28% of girls) — an estimated 9.1 million young people — don't have an accurate read on their own weight.

About 33% of kids (ages 8–11) and 27% of teens (ages 12–15) misperceive their weight status, says the report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Based on data collected between 2005 and 2012 from more than 6,100 kids and teens for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the report also finds:

• 42% of those classified as obese (48% of boys; 36% of girls) considered themselves to be about the right weight.

• 76% of those classified as overweight (81% of boys; 71% of girls) believed they were about the right weight.

• 13% of those classified as being at a healthy weight considered themselves too thin (9%) or too fat (4%).

Studies have shown that recognizing obesity can be an important step in reversing what is a major health problem for U.S. children and adolescents, and it can be an important predictor of later weight-control behaviors, says Neda Sarafrazi, a nutritional epidemiologist at NCHS and lead author of the report.

"When overweight kids underestimate their weight, they are less likely to take steps to reduce their weight or do additional things to control their weight, like adopt healthier eating habits or exercise regularly," Sarafrazi says.

"On the other hand, when normal weight or underweight kids overestimate their weight, they might have unhealthy weight-control behaviors," she says.

Weight misperception varied by race and Hispanic origin, according to the report. Black and Mexican-American youths were more likely to misperceive their weight than white children. It also varied by income level and was significantly less common among higher-income families compared with lower-income families.

The report's findings are not a surprise, says Timothy Nelson, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He was not involved in the study.

"In general, children and adolescents have a tendency to underestimate their health risks, and this certainly appears to be the case with obesity," says Nelson, who studies pediatric health behaviors. "We see a similar pattern of misperception when parents are asked about their children's weight. Parents are often unaware of the problem."

With obesity so prevalent today, it's understandable that many kids might have a skewed take on their weight, he says. "If they are surrounded by people who are overweight, they may be less likely to label their own weight as a problem."

The findings highlight the need for health professionals "to communicate with families about the child's weight," Nelson says. "This can be a tough conversation when the child is overweight, but it is critical that pediatricians help parents understand where their child stands and what steps need to be taken to get the child on a healthier track."

Source: http://www.usatoday.com

Topics: studies, kids, weight, overweight, pediatricians, obesity, health

The Top 5 Ways Nurses can Keep the Holiday Pounds from Creeping On!

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Nov 30, 2012 @ 02:06 PM

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Wouldn’t it be amazing if you could eat what you wanted, skip the gym and still look terrific? Sigh. We all can dream, right?!

A majority of us mere mortals don’t live in that wonderful world, so as the holiday season kicks off, we start to worry about the extra pounds joining us for Thanksgiving (and New Year’s…and Valentine’s Day…and Memorial Day). Want to maintain your weight and eat some delicious treats this holiday season? Here’s our guide to keeping fit and healthy…and eating your cake, too.

1. Watch your portions.

Overdid it on the turkey this year? Check out these five easy ways to take control over how much you eat (and prevent the pounds from piling on!):

  • Know how many servings of food from each food group you should have each day
  • Think “portion” and “serving size” every time you eat
  • Snack smart–especially at work
  • Cook leftovers
  • Share!

See how simple each of these steps really is!

2. Work it out…at work!

Have the holiday cakes, pies and cookies put a little wobble in your rear? Try this quick fix: When you’re standing and charting, do toe rises. That is, rise up onto your toes and then lower. Squeeze your glutes (butt muscles) together as you rise. Hello, fab tush!

We have five more awesome exercises you can sneak into your workday here!

3. Hate workouts? Don’t do ‘em…but stay active!

If running for an hour on the treadmill doesn’t strike your fancy (um, does it strike anyone’s fancy?), try one of these activities instead. You’ll be having so much fun you won’t even notice you’re exercising!

  • Dance around the house to music
  • Try some aerobics at home with a group of friends (spandex optional!)
  • Take a Zumba class with a pal
  • Get out in your garden for a few hours

See 10 more popular ways nurses are shedding the pounds.

4. Gadget-ize!

Try adding a workout gadget to help you stay in shape.

One winner? The Stamina Pilates Magic Circle, below. It powers up your workout by providing added resistance. Squeeze it between your thighs and it engages both legs and abs; do the same thing in your hands and you’ll work arms and abs. Press it against your hip using one arm and you’ll get killer deltoids and triceps. Yes, please!

Four more workout gadgets you’ve gotta try.

5. Boost your metabolism with baby steps

Find little ways to stay in motion during the day–you’ll be surprised at how much they do to burn calories and keep you fit!

  • Put down the remote
  • Wash the car by hand
  • Flex your muscles while sitting down
  • Stretch in your free time–try a quick five-minute stretch on your lunch break!

Check out eight more mini-metabolism boosters!

Topics: exercise, weight, holiday, diet

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