DiversityNursing Blog

Top 4 tips that benefit RNs and help advance their careers

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Mar 03, 2014 @ 02:09 PM

By Donna Cardillo 

It is imperative that every nurse – new and experienced – realize the healthcare landscape has completely changed. There will be plenty of opportunities for RNs and APNs who stay current with trends in education, technology, care and personal and professional development. Nurses must be willing to step outside their comfort zone and learn new ways — and places — of working and thinking about their profession. Cynthia Nowicki Hnatiuk, RN, EdD, CAE, FAAN, executive director of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nurses and the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. stresses that, to stay competitive, nurses also will have to be able to articulate the value that they bring to outcomes, beyond tasks, in any setting. So what does every nurse need to do? Here are four key areas:

1| Skill building

Clinical skills alone won’t see us through in this new paradigm. Self-marketing, computer skills, oral and written communication, conflict management, negotiation, leadership and networking skills must be learned and practiced. Hnatiuk said nurses also need to be more business savvy, with an understanding of finances, staffing, acuity and productivity.

2| Education

Higher education is no longer optional. It is a foundation for practice in any setting and fundamental to professional and personal growth and development. Hnatiuk advises that formal and continuing education, along with clinical certification, will help nurses take their practice and careers to the
next level.

For those considering advanced practice, particularly becoming nurse practitioners, the NNCC’s Hansen-Turton advises: “Don’t think too long; jump in. Opportunities will be increasing for NPs over the next 5-10 years. NPs are and will continue to be a hot commodity.” Certified nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists and certified registered nurse anesthetists also will see expanded opportunities.

3| Professional association involvement

Our professional associations are where we connect with one another, form communities, share best practices (local and national), stay current with trends and issues, and find support. Hnatiuk added that through association involvement, you learn more than you could by yourself and progressively learn leadership skills

4| Mentoring

Hnatiuk encourages nurses to take advantage of opportunities to be mentored and to mentor others. “We have so much to share. Mentoring will allow us to achieve all we’re capable of doing.”

For personalized career advice

If you have specific career-related questions, send them to Dear Donna at www.Nurse.com/AsktheExperts/DearDonna for a personalized response.

Source: Nurse.com

Topics: advice, tips, Dear Donna, RN, nurses, career

What can a new graduate do to setup and update his or her resume to make it more attractive to employers?

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Mar 03, 2014 @ 01:26 PM

Question:

Dear Donna,

I'm a recent new graduate and I'm trying to figure out how to setup and update my resume to be more attractive to employers. Are there certain topics or headlines that should be included and what are the rules for putting my clinical experience on
my resume?

Wants a More Attractive Resume 

Dear Donna replies:

Dear Wants a More Attractive Resume,

Although you may hear varying opinions about whether or not your clinical rotations should be on your new nurse resume, it is a good idea for several reasons. It looks good if you're applying to one of the facilities in that healthcare system where you did some clinical time. This is especially true if you're favorably remembered by a staff member and if you did a clinical rotation at a
well-known facility.

It's not necessary to give much detail about each position or to provide dates and time frames other than the year. You can mention significant experiences you had, such as working with ventilators. On the other hand, if you have prior healthcare work experience as an LPN or nurse's aide, it may not be necessary to list clinical rotations. Be sure to include any externships or special internships you did as well. Once you've had your first job as an RN, clinical rotations and externships would no longer be listed.

As far as categories, the other common ones are: work experience; education; licensure/credentials; volunteer work (if applicable); and special skills where you can list other languages you speak, special computer skills or any other noteworthy skills. You'll find very detailed information, including new nurse resume samples, in “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses” (http://ce.nurse.com/
course/7250/). 

Also read “FAQs about student nurse resumes” (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/Student-Resumes) for answers to other commonly asked questions.

A good resume certainly is an important marketing tool but there is much more involved in launching a successful job search, especially as a new nurse. Read “New nurse, new job strategies” (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/Strategies) to help give yourself an edge when looking for that first
full-time position.

Best wishes,
Donna 
Source: Nurse.com

Topics: help, resume, graduate, Dear Donna, employers, nurses

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