DiversityNursing Blog

Why You Should Look for a Good Nurse Residency Program as A New Graduate Nurse

Posted by Sarah West, MSN, FNP

Mon, Jun 20, 2022 @ 12:16 PM

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What is a Nurse Residency Program?

Nurse residency programs are individualized programs set up by hospitals to help new graduate Nurses transition into clinical practice. Nurse residency programs are generally available to new graduate Nurses or Nurses with less than 1 year of Nursing experience. They are designed to provide Nursing residents with the knowledge and skills to provide quality and comprehensive patient care. Most residency programs are 1 year and designed to provide new graduate Nurses with unique clinical opportunities. Nurse residents can expect to receive clinical instruction, simulation training, a clinical mentor, educational seminars and classes, and the chance to train in highly sought-after specialized areas such as the Emergency Room or the ICU.

How to Find a Good Nurse Residency Program

Finding a good Nurse residency program involves some time and research. They are found all over the country and offer many different benefits. Comparing residency programs that interest you can be done with an internet search. Many residency programs will explain what is provided within their program on their website so you can choose your best option. Things to consider when selecting a program include...

Research Facilities that Interest You

Take a look at programs in your area, or if you’re interested in relocating, look at programs in areas you’d like to live. Nurse residency programs are available all over the country, so the options for applying are endless.

Accreditation

Two organizations have begun to accredit Nurse residency programs. This means third-party organizations (AACN and ANCC) have assessed the program for its content, faculty, student satisfaction, and outcomes and certified that it meets its standards. Accredited programs are an excellent option for new graduate Nurses, but if the program you are interested in is not accredited, this does not mean that the program is a poor choice; it simply means it has not met the set requirements from these organizations and cannot claim accreditation.

Specialization

Take some time to consider a specialty that interests you. Reflect upon your Nursing school experiences, consider the areas of focus you enjoyed the most, and look for programs that allow new graduate Nurses to start within that specialty. Many Nurse residency programs offer training in areas such as the ER, specialized ICU’s, the OR, Labor and Delivery, and Pediatrics. Nurse residency programs can be a great way for inexperienced Nurses to start their Nursing careers in a specialty of choice that may otherwise not be available to them as new graduates.

Benefits of a Nurse Residency Program

There are many benefits to becoming a part of a Nurse residency program. As a new graduate Nurse, you have been given the essential foundation to function safely as a Registered Nurse, but there is much more to learn and many new skills to develop. Nurse residency programs provide new graduate Nurses with the tools they need to continue growing and developing into competent and compassionate healthcare professionals. Some of the many benefits offered by Nurse residency programs include...

Mentorship: Nurse residency programs help you develop your confidence as a new Nurse by supplying you with a Nurse mentor to help guide you through new experiences. Through mentorship with seasoned Nurses, you will gain confidence while you gain knowledge to make sound decisions confidently.

Seminars and Specialty Courses:  Nurse residency programs provide a learning curriculum centered around the specialty in which you are training. You will be provided with a schedule of classes, seminars, or online courses to complete throughout your residency to set you up for ultimate success as a new Nurse.

Certifications: Certifications are often required to work in specialty areas such as the ER, the ICU, and Pediatrics. Your Nurse residency program will help you achieve these certifications while completing your residency. Some certifications you may be required to achieve include ACLS, PALS, or TNCC.

Simulation Training: Simulation training or sim labs are a great way to help new graduate Nurses experience training opportunities that may otherwise be unavailable. Many Nurse residency programs have incorporated simulation training and testing into their curriculum to help provide new graduate Nurses with as many experiences as possible to be able to handle unexpected situations that may arise within the workplace.

Detailed Electronic Health Record Orientation: Learning how to document effectively and efficiently can be a learning curve for some new graduate Nurses. In many Nurse residency programs, a detailed electronic medical record orientation is incorporated into the curriculum to help new Nurses succeed when documenting patient care.

Curriculum and training opportunities can vary by program. Always look into what the Nurse residency program you are applying to offers to ensure you get the most out of the training opportunity.

Nurse Residency Programs Set New Grads Up for Ultimate Success

Nurse residency programs are an excellent option for many new graduate Nurses. New graduate Nurses are provided the education and support needed to transition smoothly from novice to expert through these programs. As the Nursing profession becomes increasingly sophisticated, a good Nurse residency program will set you up for a lifelong career of success in Nursing.

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Topics: nursing career, Nurse Residency Program, graduate nurse

How to Grow in the Nursing Profession

Posted by Sarah West, MSN, FNP

Fri, May 06, 2022 @ 12:30 PM

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One of the greatest benefits of the Nursing profession is that there are always new and emerging ways to improve our skills and reach new occupational heights. Medicine is ever-changing and with that, Nurses are also ever-changing. We must learn to adapt to new procedures, medications, technology, and equipment. These changes often unlock the potential we have to grow within the Nursing profession and there are many opportunities to grow right at our fingertips. Wherever you are in your Nursing journey there is always room to grow professionally.

Continuing Education Opportunities

Most states require Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for Nurses to renew their RN licenses. Although many Nurses may feel that completing CEUs can be a tedious and unnecessary task, they are a great opportunity to advance knowledge and skills. There are many different ways to fulfill CEU requirements including conferences, online classes, on-the-job training, independent study programs, and post-secondary degree programs. Completing CEUs with the intention to advance your skillset can be a great step in advancing your career.

 Seek a New Certification

Getting a Nursing certification is an excellent way to advance your career. There are hundreds of Nursing certification options available to all Nurses regardless of their current Nursing position. Holding certain certifications will make you more marketable to employers and allow for more opportunities. There is no limit to the number of certifications you can hold as a Nurse and each certification can help you gain a competitive advantage in your Nursing field. Some of these certifications include basic life support (BLS), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS), trauma Nursing core course (TNCC), and Wound Care Certification (WCN-C).

Organize or Join a Unit-Based Council

Unit-based councils are a professional practice model that facilitates shared decision-making between staff Nurses and Nursing management. These councils can impact policies, procedures, and processes in everyday patient care. Organizing or joining a unit-based council will promote evidence-based practices, improve patient-centered care, increase job satisfaction, improve Nurse retention, and foster professional growth and development. Participating in a unit-based council also looks great on a resume.

Join a Professional Organization

There are many benefits to joining a professional organization that can support your advancing career. Whatever your Nursing specialty, there is most likely a professional organization you can join to support your growing skills and knowledge. These organizations help Nurses achieve personal growth and development by supplying educational opportunities such as CEUs, education conferences, occupational networking, and academic scholarships. Taking an active part in these types of organizations can offer Nurses professional development opportunities including mentoring and leadership development. To choose an organization that will be the right fit for you look for a group that focuses on your chosen specialty or area of interest. 

Consider Specialization

Nurses have the opportunity to become specialized in their chosen Nursing field. Nursing certifications are a formal process in which clinical knowledge and skills are tested to demonstrate competence in a chosen specialty. Nurses can become specialized in various fields including but not limited to emergency Nursing, medical-surgical Nursing, rehabilitation Nursing, and critical care. Achieving board certification in your chosen specialty demonstrates that you are an expert in your chosen field and can lead to increases in pay, management positions, and more.

Take the Next Step in Your College Career

Educational advancement in the Nursing profession is endless and there is always room to climb the professional ladder. The Nursing profession offers a wide variety of job opportunities and with every new degree achieved, new doors can be opened. Going back to school is a big decision to make and there are many aspects to consider. There are many different paths that can be taken to advance your degree. Classes can be taken online or in-person as well as part-time or full-time. These options allow Nurses the flexibility they need to continue working while achieving their degrees.

Registered Nurses who have achieved a bachelor’s degree can decide to enroll in a graduate Nursing program and receive a master’s degree in Nursing. There are several different areas of focus Nurses can choose including a Nurse Practitioner (NP), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA), Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL), and Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM). The benefits of obtaining a graduate degree in Nursing include a pay increase as well as teaching and leadership opportunities.

In closing

Knowledge, skill, and passion are what can really drive a Nurse forward in the Nursing profession. What is most important is that you find what you are passionate about and go for it with integrity. By doing this, you will find yourself opening the door to new opportunities that will lead to your own personal journey of growth and development in Nursing.

Topics: nursing, nurses, nursing career, nursing profession

Nursing Opportunities Beyond The Bedside

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Oct 19, 2021 @ 04:39 PM

GettyImages-641755238The Nursing field offers many Nursing specialties to choose from depending on your interests and skills. And, there are plenty of opportunities to get the necessary training to move on to a different specialty.

The stress of the pandemic has increased Nurses' interest in positions beyond the hospital setting. 

Some of those opportunities include:

Nurse Educator

Nurse Educators don’t work in a traditional hospital or medical facility. They teach in universities, technical schools, and hospital-based Nursing programs. They can also work as administrators, consultants, or independent contractors.

Forensic Nurse

According to ForensicNurses.org, Forensic Nurses provide specialized care for patients who are experiencing acute and long-term health consequences associated with victimization or violence, and/or have unmet evidentiary needs relative to having been victimized or accused of victimization. In addition, Forensic Nurses provide consultation and testimony for civil and criminal proceedings relative to Nursing practice, care given, and opinions rendered regarding findings.

Many Forensic Nurses work in hospitals but they also work in community anti-violence programs, coroner’s and medical examiners offices, corrections institutions, and psychiatric facilities.

Health Policy Nurse

A Health Policy Nurse (HPN) plays an active role in forming and communicating public health policies with the goal of improving the overall well-being of society. With a strong background of hands-on Nursing expertise, HPNs are able to aid and act as policy makers within our government and healthcare systems, according to Johnson & Johnson Nursing.

Flight Nurse

Flight Nurses provide care onboard medical helicopters, airplanes, or jets often used in emergency situations to get patients to the best hospital as quickly as possible.

Flight Nurses also transfer patients between facilities. Patients might need to be moved to obtain lifesaving treatment unavailable at the original facility or to relocate to another part of the country. They also communicate with medical professionals at the receiving facility, to ensure all case notes and patient files get to the right person.

Nurse Writer

Nurse writers educate readers on healthcare topics through their personal knowledge and experience.

According to RegisteredNursing.org, they can freelance for medical journals, guides, and other health-related publications (newspapers, magazines, websites, etc.) that require accumulated knowledge, education, experience, and objectivity. Nurses can also write academic papers, write grants for hospitals or programs, coordinate programs, or assist the Communications Department in hospitals or other organizations.

Camp Nurse

Camp Nurses typically serve children or teens, in a camp environment. This can include summer camps or other camps that last from days to weeks to even months at a time, but are usually temporary.

Depending on the size of the camp, Nurses could be required to work alone or as part of a team, making critical decisions on patient care. They may also be required to obtain and keep records on allergies, medical histories, and medications of all camp participants.

Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis Nurses work with patients suffering from kidney diseases and illnesses. They administer dialysis to patients at dialysis centers, nursing homes, or at the patient's home.

Yacht Nurse

As a Nurse/Stewardess, you will be expected to maintain the on-board medical ward and Nursing station. This includes overseeing stock inventory, ordering supplies, and recording inventories. Depending on the yacht owner's health, you may be required for certain medical duties.

Although long working hours are required, the benefits are amazing with salaries often higher than other Nursing positions. Yachting is not for the faint-hearted though and you must have a sense of adventure and an urge to travel.

A Nursing career isn't always a straight path. You have the opportunity to work in a variety of different environments and grow your skills and knowledge. Take a chance and use that degree to explore your options. Discover what Nursing path fulfills and challenges you.

Topics: nursing career, nursing jobs, nursing opportunities

Choosing Nursing School or Medical School

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Jul 07, 2021 @ 12:14 PM

GettyImages-1270585032Many people interested in a career in healthcare originally think they’ll go to medical school and become a Doctor, but ultimately end up becoming a Nurse. Choosing between Nursing and Medical school depends on each person's career goals and what kind of studies they'd be most interested in.

It's important to explore both options because while they can be similar in some aspects, they are very different in others.

Length of Training

The length of training is a major difference. Nursing programs range from 2 years for an Associate's degree, to 4 years for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, to 6 years for a Master's. Medical school requires a minimum of 8 years of education plus residency.

Time Spent With Patients

Witnessing a loved one be taken care of by a medical professional is one reason many people choose to start a career in healthcare. If building a strong relationship with patients is meaningful to you, a career in Nursing is probably a better choice.

Often Doctors are in and out of the patient's room while the Nurse spends their entire shift taking care of a handful of patients. 

Like many of our Annual DiversityNursing.com $5,000 Education Award Winners, Shelah Roanhorse, our 2021 Winner, initially wanted to be a Doctor, but after her brother Nate became sick with cancer, she witnessed the dedication and care the Nurses gave him. She saw how involved his Nurses were with his day-to-day care. This greatly influenced her decision to become a Nurse.

Career Opportunities

There is a high demand for healthcare professionals.

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects a shortage of between 54,100 - 139,000 Physicians by the year 2033.

And, According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment of Registered Nurses is projected to grow 7% from 2019 - 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.

Doctors may be limited by their specialty area. A Nurse could be limited too depending on the specialty, but Nurses can work both in and out of the hospital in a variety of settings including...

  • Educators at Schools of Nursing
  • School Nurses
  • Insurance companies as health coaches, case managers and Nurse navigators
  • On-staff Nurses at non-healthcare companies
  • Law firms as medical forensics investigators

Leadership Roles

There is a misconception that leadership opportunities are limited in Nursing.  

Many Nurses lead initiatives to improve quality of care and patient safety. Some Nurses join their healthcare organization's C-suite and become Chief Nursing Officers or Chief Diversity Officers.  

With ongoing healthcare reform and new models of care delivery across the U.S., the role of Nurses is likely to further expand and allow them to take on new and dynamic roles in healthcare.

Whether you choose to become a Nurse or a Doctor, both careers are extraordinarily rewarding. Try to learn as much as you can about both avenues of healthcare before making your big decision.

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Topics: medical school, nursing school, medical careers, nursing career, healthcare careers

2021 Top Paying States For Nurses

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jan 22, 2021 @ 01:09 PM

nursesalaryA 2021 list ranking the best-paying states for Nurses has been released by Business.org. They calculated this list by comparing the average Nursing salary to the average income to find the percentage difference. Then they calculated how many hours Nurses must work to afford rent.

Here are some key points from the report:

Over 2.9 million Nurses work in the United States, and make an average salary of $77,460 per year.

Nationally, Nurses make 45% more than the average salary for all other occupations. And in 15 states, Nurses make more than the national average. 

Hawaii topped the list, with Nurses making 89% more than other occupations for a total salary of $104,060.

Washington DC ranks last on the list. Nurses in DC make only 5.6% more than the average salary for all other occupations.

California boasts the highest wage per hour for Nurses, at $54.44. South Dakota has the lowest wage per hour for Nurses at $28.63.

Nationally, Nurses work an average of 29.5 hours to be able to afford a month’s rent. The national average income requires 42.7 hours of work to afford rent. 

Following Hawaii, the other top states for Nursing salaries are Nevada, California, Oregon, and New Mexico. 

To view the full list of best salaries by state, click this link.

According to a U.S. News & World report, Nurse Practitioners made a median salary of $109,820 in 2019. The best-paid 25 percent made $127,030 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $92,790. 

The best paying states for Nurse Practitioners: 

  • California- $138,660
  • Washington- $126,920
  • Hawaii- $124,000
  • New Jersey- $123,810
  • Minnesota- $122,850
 
 

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Topics: nursing career, Nurse Salary, nursing salaries

The Best Things About Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jul 22, 2019 @ 11:05 AM

GettyImages-862156076-1Nursing is an emotionally fulfilling career providing many ups and downs. Hopefully more ups than downs! It isn't an easy path, but if you are called to Nursing, it’s worth it. Some of the best things about being a Nurse are experiences that you won't find in many other jobs. Here are a few reasons why Nurses love being Nurses.

 

Relationships

Many times you form strong relationships with your patients. You spend all day taking care of their every need. During the course of your shift, you're usually working with the same patients so you form a special bond with them. Being able to get to know someone and help them when they're at their most vulnerable and sick is a really wonderful, gratifying feeling.

 

Never Boring

In this fast paced environment there's rarely a boring day at work. You’re juggling many important balls and pulled in many directions so there's no time to get bored. There's always something that needs to be done or someone to assist.

 

Job Security

Job security is another great thing about Nursing. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly 3 million Registered Nurses work in the US right now. BSL predicts the country will also add half a million new RN jobs by 2026 due to the aging baby boomer population and an "increased emphasis on preventative care". 

 

Schedule Flexibility

You can choose a schedule that works for your lifestyle. In the hospital environment, shifts include day, night and weekends. You can also choose what days. There are part-time nursing positions and weekend only programs. Throughout your career, you'll be able to adjust your schedule based on the kind of life your living.

 

Friendship

The relationships you build with fellow Nurses can last a lifetime. Nursing is usually a very team-oriented profession therefore, you have plenty of people to help you through difficult situations. Over time, your colleagues can become some of your very closest friends. Friendships can form with some patients too.

 

Career Flexibility

You can change your career path without changing your career. Businesses that employ Nurses include hospitals, private medical practices, schools (School Nurse and Nurse Educators), insurance companies, etc. With additional education and training, you can change your specialty. For example, you could go from being a Clinical Nurse Specialist to a Pediatric Nurse.

 

Career Satisfaction

Many Nurses tell us they love helping and making a difference in someone's life every single day. They say this is the Nursing profession’s biggest reward.

 

Do you have a reason why you love being a Nurse that we didn’t include? Please share it with us!

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Topics: nursing, nursing career

Do Health Exchange policies Change the Game for Full-Time Nurses?

Posted by Wilson Nunnari

Fri, Feb 28, 2014 @ 08:43 AM

by

For: http://onlinelpntorn.org

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It just occurred to me that the new health exchange insurance policies could change the nursing career marketplace and give nurses a lot of new employment options: we can play job Tetris. Why? Read on.

Before the individual policies were available, nurses without spouses or another source of health insurance were bound to full-time work with benefits unless they opted to live dangerously. Individual policies were just totally unaffordable (I used to pay about $1,000 per month for an individual policy when I was self-employed). Now they are affordable, and they are particularly so if you consider the salary differential between full-time and PRN hourly wages. It is usually significant.

This one factor allows some mix-and-match in job searches. Perhaps your dream job has a part-time position available, so you take that and pick up PRN shifts somewhere else. Perhaps you have interests in two areas, so you find PRN positions in both. Perhaps it even works out financially for you to work full-time hours as a PRN nurse where you already are, if you work at one of the hospitals where PRN nurses can always pick and choose hours (this plan will not work if PRN hours are what they were intended to be and not guaranteed).

Disclaimer: this does not include other benefits such as retirement contributions and term life insurance that are generally offered, nor does it generally offer paid time off. Speaking as someone who was self-employed for a decade, I can readily state that employer matching for retirement and paid time off are benefits worth accepting a lower hourly rate than I would get for PRN status. However, I know that for many people health insurance is the sticking point, and for those people a whole new world may have just opened up.

Of course, your mileage may vary with the exchange policies versus a group insurance policy with an employer. I have found so far that with mine, the benefits are either similar to or better than the group policy I used to have, and I even bought a lower-tier policy because I thought it would be much more temporary than it has ended up being. They really do cover preventive screens and such at 100%. They really do pay what they say they will for copays and prescriptions, and this was not the case for my group policy. There was always an exception. As I say, this is my mileage only.

Just think, though, of the possibilities. This is important given the tight job market for nurses right now. What if you were not tied to benefits? Do you have a hobby or a sideline you could monetize and be a nurse two shifts per week? Do you have a previous career you could still put to use part time and pick up shifts now and then as a nurse?

Thinking of job opportunities this way opens up a new range of options if you are willing to, I hate to say it, think outside the box. Just keep in mind the question, “What if I didn’t have to look just in the full-time section?”

Topics: full-time, nurses, nursing career, Toward a More Diverse Health Care Workforce

Nurse Todd retires after 61 years of caring

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Wed, Jun 05, 2013 @ 01:39 PM

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By  Jennifer Smola 

Sixty-one years after graduating from Mount Carmel College of Nursing, one of the school’s first black graduates is finally hanging up her stethoscope.

June Todd, 83, retired yesterday from Dr. Charles Tweel’s family-medicine practice on the Northwest Side. Todd graduated from Mount Carmel in 1952, in a class of 52 nurses. All were women, and, for the first time, four were black.

Todd, who lives in Worthington, attended Harding High School in Marion, north of Columbus. She considered studying library science, but her school librarian told her she would have a hard time getting a job in the North because of her race.

“I said, ‘That’s not going to work,’  ” Todd recalled. “So I decided I wanted to become a nurse."

Her race seldom made a difference during her nursing career, she said. And she has fond memories of her time at Mount Carmel.

“I loved the nuns,” she said. “Everybody was so nice.”

Tweel described Todd as a “ball of energy” who never missed work. She’s popular not only among her co-workers but with patients, who “like seeing her more than they like seeing me,” he said.

Enid Patterson, a patient for 10 years, said she was sad to see Todd go.

“She’s not just my nurse,” Patterson said. “She’s my friend.”

When Tweel hired Todd 13 years ago, she planned to stay only a year or two, she said, but she stuck around because she liked the work.

Her co-workers said she brought humor and energy to the office every day.

“She’s the only 80-some-odd-year-old woman that has an opinion on everything from Hillary Clinton to why Chris and Rihanna should not be together,” co-worker Beth Shahan said. “She’s very with-it and hip.”

Though Todd is retired, she says she’s not done working. She plans to volunteer at local nursing homes and perhaps at a Worthington library.

Topics: black, RN, race, nursing career, retirement, Mount Carmel College of Nursing

The Single-most Important Question to Ask All RNs in an Interview

Posted by Wilson Nunnari

Mon, Apr 15, 2013 @ 08:03 PM

by Jennifer Mensik for ERE

Regardless of the interview style or methodology used, there is one question that everyone should ask of a registered nurse in an interview. This includes all positions, from staff RN to Chief Nursing Officer.

What is your definition of nursing?

This helps you to sort out whether you have a professional-role-based RN or one who might only be there for the paycheck. A professional-role-based RN is a nurse who understands the complexities of the profession and is committed to placing the patient first, as opposed to a tas- based RN who is there to just clock time and take home a paycheck. If your organization prefers behavioral-based questions, take that question to the next level as a two-part question by asking the RN candidate to give you an example of when they exemplified the definition they just gave you.
nurse
You might say, “Are not all RNs professionals?” One just needs to understand the components of a profession to know that there are RNs in the profession who are not professional. Let me explain by starting with the sort of definition you are looking for and then I will touch on the difference between a technical and professional RN.

The American Nurses Association defines nursing as “the protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.” That is a long definition that many RNs will not be able to give you verbatim. However, the professional RN should be able to talk about and say things that are of a very similar nature. The responses between the professional and technical RN will be very different. Most times when I have asked this question, it has stumped many nurses, or was the one they needed the most time to think about before they were able to give their response.

The type of answers you want from a professional RN are statements or an explanation of caring, kindness, ethical, and wholistic care of the entire patient, an understanding that the RN is a professional who is accountable for themselves, and understands that they have a duty to society to place the patient first.

The technical, less desirable answer is when the RN describes their profession as a set of tasks, like medication administration, bathing, assessments, budgets, staffing, or worse yet, someone who assists the physician. While you might expect your RN candidate to do those things and to be competent in those areas, the professional RN understands that. It is a given that part of the professional responsibilities is to carry out tasks and orders, but it is in the manner in which they do it. The technical RN does not understand how to be professional, or worse yet, may not want to be a professional.

Can you teach a technical RN to be professional? I suppose, but only if they are open to it. This is not a simple task they can learn, but a way of being. A professional RN understands their role as a RN, their accountability to the patient and the family, their coworkers, and the organization, and will hold others to the highest standard of patient care.

This type of RN embodies what we want to see in our nurses, like Florence Nightingale. Florence could easily point out the technical nurse. Those who only work as a RN because it’s a good paying, stable job, and where you only have to work three 12-hour shifts; the one who does the minimum to maintain their employment and the minimum to maintain their own education, skills, and professional standards. It is those who do not say anything when another RN or staff member may be jeopardizing patient safety as it’s “not their responsibility” to hold others accountable. Professional RNs do hold each other accountable for quality and safe patient care.

Your next steps:

Recruiters: Have a discussion with your nurse executive on whether this is a question they would like to you ask. Talk with you nurse executive about their nursing philosophy for the organization and how they would like to see RN candidates answer that question.

Nurse managers: What is your philosophy about nursing? Can you articulate it and share with your recruiters so that the right candidates could be screened early in the process? Even if used in the early stages of recruitment,  still include this question in the onsite interview process with the candidate and yourself or the team. Ensure your team who maybe interviewing the RN candidate understands this question and the type of response you want.

As organizations struggle to improve quality measures and patient satisfaction, which type of RN do you want on your team? The professional RN will help your organization obtain success in these areas. If an RN can give you a professional-based answer for the definition of nursing, you are halfway there in choosing the right candidate for your patients and organization.

Topics: nursing student, nursing, nurses, career, nursing career

Salary: Top paying specialties–perioperative

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Tue, Feb 05, 2013 @ 02:01 PM

BY SCRUBS EDITOR

 

Thinkstock | istockphotoEver wonder what the top 10 best paying nursing specialties are?. So far we’ve covered the top 3 – #1: certified RN anesthetists, #2 orthopedics and #3 geriatrics. This week, at number 4, we’re taking a look at perioperative nursing.

Nurses in this field make between $61,000 and $108,000 (high end, which you get by being an advanced practice nurse). It’s the perfect gig for OR nurses who don’t want to deal with anesthesia. Typically, it’s a good idea to have Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification.

If you’re a new nurse you may be wondering: What the heck is perioperative nursing? Quite simply, it’s the specialty that works with patients who are about to have operative or other invasive procedures. Perioperative nurses work closely with a range of medical personnel from surgeons, nurse anesthetists, surgical technologists and nurse practitioners. On a typical day you could find yourself performing preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative care.

 

Topics: nursing, nursing career, specialty, top paying, perioperative

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