DiversityNursing Blog

Tips For Nurses Working Through The Holidays

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Nov 23, 2022 @ 02:47 PM

GettyImages-1423947212Many people look forward to the holidays, however it can be a stressful time for Nurses working through the holiday season and missing festivities. Here are several tips to help make working through the holidays a little brighter.

Holiday Feast

Take time during a shift to fuel up with some yummy foods. Have everyone bring in their favorite meal or side dish, holiday treat, or order some take out. 

Work Fun

Organize a secret Santa with your unit or you may also consider planning a holiday party outside of your work setting. It’s nice to take the time out to blow off steam and enjoy your co-workers’ company. 

Decorate

With permission from your manager, decorate your work station, the hallways or even yourself with some holiday swag. Hang up paper pumpkins and turkeys. String twinkle lights and set up a holiday tree. Just be sure to be sensitive and inclusive of everyone’s holidays, not just your own. 

Celebrate On A Different Day

If you can't celebrate a holiday on the actual date, pick another day that works for your family or friends. Being with the people you love is what's important, no matter the date. 

Spread Holiday Cheer

This season is all about giving and as you know, giving makes you feel good. Try giving small gifts like scented hand sanitizers, cards, or decorative trinkets to your coworkers. Brighten patient's day with a note, little ornament, or holiday craft. 

Stay Connected

Make the most of your breaks during your shift. If able, FaceTime or Zoom with friends and family, follow their posts on social media, or ask someone to share videos of the holiday gatherings with you. Utilize available technology to stay as connected as possible. 

Silver Lining

Focus on the bright side, there may be benefits to working a holiday shift, such as extra pay or the next holiday off. You may also, hopefully, get to enjoy a slower work pace or less traffic during your commute.

Remember You're Important

Healthcare will always be 24/7 and someone must be there to care for patients. You're saving and changing lives by showing up to work. During the holidays that care can mean the world to a patient especially if their family or friends aren't able to visit or stay long. What you do as a Nurse is so important, don't you forget it! 

Topics: Holidays, holiday shifts, nursing, nurses, working holidays, nursing career, holiday stress

Ethics in Nursing

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Fri, Oct 21, 2022 @ 10:48 AM

GettyImages-1365601656What is Nursing Ethics?

Ethics in Nursing helps Nurses maintain professional accountability and navigate the complexities of the Nursing profession. Ethics are the moral principles by which people should carry themselves. Ethics is one of the most critical concepts in Nursing as it dictates our role as caregivers.

The Nursing code of ethics consists of 4 main principles. These principles are used to guide Nurses in delivering quality Nursing care while also fulfilling the ethical obligations expected within the profession. The principles include autonomy, beneficence, justice, and non-maleficence.

Four Main Principals of Nursing Ethics  

Autonomy

Autonomy in Nursing refers to the right each patient has to make decisions based on their personal beliefs or values. As Nurses, we are responsible for educating patients on care measures and allowing them to accept or refuse medical interventions.  We must respect the choices of our patients and adapt our care to what best suits their wants. An example of autonomy in Nursing is educating a patient about the side effects of medication and allowing the patient to accept or decline taking it.  

Beneficence

Beneficence is the principle that every action performed by the Nurse should be to promote good. This means that every task a Nurse completes during her shift should be done for the sole benefit of the patient. Simple things we do in Nursing, like holding the hand of a dying patient or taking a patient outside to get fresh air, are considered beneficence.

Justice

Justice in the Nursing code of ethics means that patients have the right to impartial treatment. We do not judge our patients in the Nursing profession. Patients must be respected and treated equally regardless of their financial or insurance status, gender, age, or ethnicity. Justice in Nursing is treating all our patients equally and ensuring they receive the best possible care regardless of their situation.

Non-maleficence

Nonmaleficence is closely related to beneficence but is a different concept altogether. Nonmaleficence means that a Nurse should do no harm to the patient. This principal guides Nurses to maintain their obligation to protect their patients. Nurses should always prevent bad outcomes for their patients whenever possible by removing them from any harm. An example of nonmaleficence in Nursing is preventing medication errors by ensuring the “7 rights” of medication administration are correct or by applying a bed alarm to a patient's bed with dementia to prevent falls.

What are Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing?

The 4 main principles of Nursing ethics prepare us to deal with the ethical dilemmas we encounter while caring for our patients. Ethical dilemmas in Nursing create a conflict between 2 courses of action.  

The competing courses of action are both correct but can create different consequences that must be considered. Ethical dilemmas are important to recognize because, as Nurses, we cannot interject our personal beliefs into the ethical dilemmas at hand. Examples of ethical dilemmas can include:  

  • Protecting the privacy of an adolescent
  • A parent refusing to vaccinate their child
  • End of life decision making
  • Informed consent
  • Pro-life vs. prochoice

Becoming an Ethical Nurse

Nursing is consistently regarded as one of the most trusted professions. Nursing ethics are essential to know and understand as it helps guide our everyday Nursing practice. Nurses are thoroughly prepared to deal with the ethical situations they encounter through many years of education and training.

Nurses can continue to learn how to conduct themselves ethically and how to deal with ethical issues through continued work experiences. Every patient interaction can teach us something new about ethical dilemmas and how we can best handle them in the workplace.

Topics: nursing ethics, Ethics, nursing career, nursing profession, nurse ethics, nursing practice

Things Nurses Wish Their Patients Knew

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Mon, Oct 17, 2022 @ 02:32 PM

GettyImages-1210971758Across the entire patient experience, Nurses have a hand in almost every aspect of the patient's healthcare journey. Nurses are compassionate, and dedicated, and work tirelessly to meet the needs of their patients. Because Nurses are at the forefront of every patient interaction, there are many things that we wish our patients knew and understood about how we work and handle our everyday tasks.  

Every Patient is a Priority, but You May Have to Wait 

Nursing is a busy and fast-paced profession. Our days are jam-packed with patient care tasks, documentation, and care coordination. More often than not, it can be challenging to find time to eat, drink water, or even use the bathroom during our shifts. We hate having to make our patients wait for things they may want or need, but sometimes we wish our patients understood that we take great consideration in prioritizing our patient's needs. So, if you are asked to wait or have been waiting for something longer than you think you should have, please understand that your Nurse may have a more pressing matter to attend to, and every patient deserves our complete attention. 

Nurses are People Too 

Nurses often sacrifice their personal needs to care for their patients. As mentioned earlier, we often forgo meals and bathroom breaks to ensure we can complete all our tasks and care for your needs. Nursing can often be a thankless job. Nurses understand that you want the best quality care, and we strive to provide that to every one of our patients. Patience, understanding, and respect are all that we ask for in return. 

We Care More Than You Think We Do 

Nurses are multitaskers. At any given time, we can be juggling more tasks than you may even realize. Sometimes Nurses may come off as flustered or in a hurry, but that does not mean we do not value your wants or needs. Nurses stay late and come in on their days off to ensure their patients receive excellent care. We even think about you long after we've met because you have touched our lives. Patients are what make the Nursing profession so rewarding. We do what we do for you. 

We May Not Know Everything

We encourage our patients to ask questions, but that does not mean we have all the answers. Sometimes we may need to find the answer for you by speaking to a Doctor or collaborating with other Nurses. This does not mean we do not know what we are doing. It simply means that every patient has a different healthcare journey, and often situations arise that we may not have experience with. Our top priority is that you receive the best quality care, so if you ask a question and we do not know the answer, please rest assured that we will do everything within our power to get you the information you are looking for. 

We Do Not Judge  

Nurses do not do their jobs to judge our patients. Please always be honest when answering questions or providing your health history. Withholding information because you may be embarrassed or may not think it relevant can significantly impact the care we can provide. We care about you and want to ensure that you are cared for in the best possible way. Nurses are also prepared to take care of all your personal needs. We do not mind doing ‘gross’ or ‘embarrassing’ tasks. You do not have to say sorry for natural bodily functions. We understand and are ok with it, I promise!

The Nursing profession is a delicate blend of knowledge, compassion, and critical thinking. We strive every day to make a positive impact on the lives of our patients. A strong Nurse-patient relationship improves your healthcare experience and helps us provide you with the best quality care.

Topics: nurse-to-patient, nurse, nurses, nursing career, nursing profession, nursing workforce, nurse role, nurse communication

The Growing Role of Nurse Case Managers

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Oct 12, 2022 @ 01:59 PM

GettyImages-1389496437A career as a Nurse Case Manager gives you the opportunity to make a huge impact on patient's lives and develop rewarding relationships.

The Case Manager's (CM) role is centered around working with patients and their families to make sure they are provided with appropriate health care providers, resources, and services so they receive the proper care they need. 

Primary responsibilities include:

  • Evaluating a patient's medical history

  • Acting as a liaison between patients, health care providers, and health insurers

  • Creating care plans and scheduling appointments

  • Educating patients and their families on relevant health-related matters

  • Keeping track of health outcomes and suggesting possible treatment changes


“Because Nurses are trained to work on interdisciplinary teams and understand how to deal with patients’ psychosocial needs, they are the perfect choice to manage their care,” says Tracy Towne, PhD, faculty member at Purdue University Global School of Nursing. “It’s a more holistic approach to care and services, and it is an incredibly valuable role when it comes to supporting those with chronic illnesses.”

You’ll also be able to choose which area you would like to specialize. According to Western Governors University, some of the most common Case Management Nursing specializations are:

  • Patient specialty—focuses on a specific patient population such as the elderly (geriatrics) or children (pediatrics).
  • Service specialty—focuses on a specific service area such as hospice, home healthcare, or rehabilitation.
  • Duration specialty—focuses on the length of patient care such as short-term injury rehabilitation or long-term illness management.
  • Disease specialty—focuses on patients suffering from a specific disease or chronic illness such as diabetes, cancer, substance abuse, or mental illness.

Choosing to become a CM is a great choice for Nurses, since it is less physically demanding, has great pay, and is in high demand. 

According to Zippia, CMs in the Nursing field are expected to rise nearly 16% over the next ten years. This increase is due to the growing elderly population as well as a rise in those with chronic illnesses. 

The estimated average salary for a RN Case Manager is $107,568 per year in the United States, according to Glassdoor.

Becoming a Nurse CM requires a Registered Nurse (RN) license. It is more common to switch to case management later on in your RN career.

This role requires experience so it is suggested you advance your career with certification programs. Certifications aren't mandatory for employment, but they can increase your pay and make you more eligible for future job opportunities.

Interested in learning more about Case Management? Check out these resources:

Case Management Society of America

National Association of Case Management

American Case Management Association

The Higher Education Case Managers Association

Topics: nursing, nurses, nursing career, case mangement, Nurse case manager, case manager

Tips For Balancing A Nursing Career and Parenting

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Fri, Sep 30, 2022 @ 11:55 AM

GettyImages-1325578537Being a parent and a Nurse are demanding roles and it may seem almost impossible to thrive and manage both at the same time, but it is possible! If you're a parent in the Nursing field consider these tips below. 

Parent Guilt

This feeling of missing out on important moments in your children's lives while away at work can really build up negative emotions such as anxiety and depression. 

Author and Journalist Amy Westervelt has some advice to overcoming this guilt. First, stop beating yourself up over your choices and circumstances. Instead, remember the reasons behind your choices. Every time you think to yourself, “I feel bad about __” replace that with, “I made that decision because ___” and then move forward.

 Amy mentions it's important to remember that guilt is inherently tied to empathy. Feeling guilty means you have compassion, care, and concern for those around you. 

Set Standards Early

You must show up and give it your all at work as well as at home so it's best if you set clear parameters and priorities from the start. Openly talk with Supervisors, Coworkers, and Family about what shifts and commitments you are able to attend.

It's great to help coworkers with an extra shift from time to time but work shouldn't come at the expense of your family. If it's your day off, don't check emails and voicemails, focus solely on enjoying your time with loved ones. 

Connect With Fellow Nurse Parents 

There are plenty of Nurses who have children, it's a good idea to get to know them. They can give you tons of great advice and suggestions to improve your work life balance.

These parents know exactly what you're going through and can offer empathy and support. Just being able to talk to someone who can relate is a stress reliever. 

Declutter Your Days

In a perfect world you'd attend every parent teacher meeting, do car pool, eat pizza after soccer matches, etc. but in reality you can't say yes to everything. Life can become hectic with everyone's different schedules.

So in order to stay on top of everyone's availability, creating a calendar at home and on your phone is a great way to stay organized. You can plan out meals for the week, keep track of extra curricular activities, kid's chores etc. Organization is key to a good work life balance.  

Hired Help

If you can afford to outsource help it can alleviate a lot of stress and free up time to spend with your family. For example, if trips to the grocery store are taking up too much time try getting them delivered. Overwhelmed with house cleaning? Hire someone to come and help clean for a couple hours. You find you don't have the energy to walk your dogs, local dog walkers are always available. 

Don't Forget About You

Balancing family and your career can tire you out physically and mentally. There's the old saying, "You can't pour from an empty glass." So it's important to take care of yourself. 

It's okay to ask friends and family for a helping hand in taking care of the kids so you can have some time to do things for you.

Use that calendar we mentioned above to schedule some self-care or time for the hobbies you enjoy. And if you find yourself with an open time slot, that doesn't necessarily mean you should fill it, leave some space to breathe. 

Give yourself some of the love you are constantly giving to others. You are a wonderful Parent and a terrific Nurse, so keep going - you got this! 

Topics: nursing career, self-care, work life balance, parenting

Is Nursing an Art or a Science?

Posted by Sarah West, MSN, FNP

Fri, Aug 19, 2022 @ 10:44 AM

GettyImages-1208547781Nursing is a profession that requires compassion as well as expertise, making it both an art and a science. Empathy and compassion are critical characteristics of an excellent Nurse. These qualities help us to connect with patients on an individualized basis and improve patient outcomes.

Nurses must also be educated, motivated, and have a strong understanding of evidence-based practice. Nurses must find a unique balance between using their heads and hearts, as well as the balance between the art and science of Nursing to provide our patients with the highest quality care.

The Art of Nursing

Florence Nightingale was the first to coin the phrase, the Art of Nursing. She understood that Nursing is a profession in which physical tasks must be adapted into individualized patient care, making Nursing an educated art form. Empathy and compassion are at the forefront of what makes Nursing an art. Although compassion and empathy are similar concepts, they are vitally different and often confused with one another.

Empathy is the ability to feel the emotions of others. As Nurses, we care for patients when they are most vulnerable. When patients seek medical attention, they can often be fearful, sad, or even angry. To care for these patients respectfully and efficiently, Nurses must be able to empathize with patients to facilitate a strong Nurse-patient relationship to promote healing.

Compassion is the ability to feel the emotions of others while experiencing a desire to help. Nursing is a helping profession and to be an excellent Nurse, you must genuinely want to help others. The task-oriented approach to Nursing can sometimes challenge Nurses to maintain a human connection to our patient. Still, we must always strive to connect with and understand our patients to ensure they are cared for comprehensively. The emotions behind why we do the things we do is what makes Nursing an artform.

The Science of Nursing

The science of Nursing is the ‘why’ behind the tasks we carry out daily. The Nursing profession is built on evidence-based practice. Evidence-based practice collects, processes, and implements research findings into clinical practice and improves patient outcomes.

As Nurses, we strive to provide our patients with the best care possible, so we must ensure that our actions and tasks are well researched and have been shown to improve the health and safety of our patients. This is what the science of Nursing is all about, having a reason behind our actions and an understanding that our interventions improve the outcomes of patients.

Education is also at the foundation of the science of Nursing. To become a Nurse, we must complete coursework that prepares us to meet the diverse needs of our patients and become safe healthcare professionals. Nursing coursework includes detailed education on the intricacies of the human body, disease processes, health policy, and hands-on instruction to develop clinical skillsets.

The nursing curriculum has been well studied and tailored to ensure that new graduate Nurses can provide safe patient care. We know that Nursing programs are effective in producing safe healthcare workers because we have been able to research and understand what education and skills are needed to produce safe novice Nurses.

Once a Nurse has graduated from a Nursing program, they must complete continuing education courses to continue to improve their knowledge and skills. And as medicine is constantly ever-changing, Nurses can never stop learning and growing.

The Nursing Profession

Nursing is not just a career option. It is a true craft where individuals must be able to incorporate evidence-based practices into compassionate and individualized patient care. It is truly a scientific art that must be carried out precisely and efficiently for our patients to receive the highest quality and most up-to-date care.

Nursing is as much of a science as it is an art. The science of Nursing explains a Nurse’s daily work and why tasks are performed, while the art of Nursing is centered around the human connections needed to truly be an effective Nurse.

The art and science of the Nursing profession is ever evolving as we are continually developing new healthcare interventions and continuing to improve upon our human approach to healthcare.

Nursing is a delicate balance of skill, expertise, compassion, and empathy. Without each other, the Nursing profession would not be the respected profession it is today.

Topics: nursing, nurses, nursing career, nursing experience, nursing jobs, nursing profession, art of nursing

A Career In Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Jul 13, 2022 @ 10:47 AM

GettyImages-1317092006While physical health is undoubtedly important, so is Mental Health. Millions of Americans are affected by mental illness each year. Psychiatric Nurses have the specialized knowledge and skills needed to treat these illnesses. 

According to the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA), Psychiatric Nurses make up the second largest group of behavioral health professionals in the U.S.

In the United States, suicide is a leading cause of death and in 2020, about:

  • 1 in 5 American adults experienced a Mental Health issue
  • 1 in 6 young people experienced a major depressive episode
  • 1 in 20 Americans lived with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression

The pandemic has increased the need for Mental Health care. According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the percentage of adults with recent symptoms of an anxiety or a depressive disorder increased from 36.4% to 41.5% from August 2020 to February 2021.  

There is a dire need for more Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses (PMHNs).

More than 75% of all U.S. counties have a shortage of Mental Health professionals and almost all counties have an unmet need for Psychiatrists.

Mental Health Nurses work in a wide variety of inpatient and outpatient work settings, either as a specialty position or in primary care. Some job opportunities include military care, forensics, private practices, clinics, community health centers, public health facilities, schools, substance abuse centers, senior centers, hospice, rehabilitation services, telehealth and case management.

The day to day duties of PMHNs include:

  • Conducting an assessment of a patient’s status
  • Conducting intake screenings, initial evaluation, and triage
  • Providing nursing care following a treatment plan
  • Administering medication and/or other treatment regimens
  • Teaching patients self-care activities
  • Engaging in crisis intervention and situation stabilization (when necessary)
  • Educating patients on how to manage their condition
  • Providing education to patients’ families and communities
  • Working efficiently alongside other members of an interdisciplinary team

“It’s a very rewarding field. As a Psychiatric health care provider, you may be the first person to talk to someone about why they are in crisis, and that can be a humbling experience," said Emma Mangano, DNP, PMHNP at Johns Hopkins Hospital

Some essential traits of a Mental Health Nurse include:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Good Communication
  • Empathy
  • Reliability 
  • Confidence
  • Compassion

The salary of a PMHN depends on their level of experience and the amount of specialized training they have undergone. According to Indeed, the average Mental Health Nurse's salary in the U.S. is $87,156.

A career in Mental Health Nursing can be demanding, but it is extremely rewarding.

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Windi Woods, says that the best part of the job is “knowing that this team is the end of the road for most of these patients and we give them hope." 

Topics: mental health, nursing career, mental health nursing, psychiatric mental health nurse, behavioral health, Psychiatric Nurses, mental health nurse

Why You Should Look for a Good Nurse Residency Program as A New Graduate Nurse

Posted by Sarah West, MSN, FNP

Mon, Jun 20, 2022 @ 12:16 PM

GettyImages-1239550987

What is a Nurse Residency Program?

Nurse residency programs are individualized programs set up by hospitals to help new graduate Nurses transition into clinical practice. Nurse residency programs are generally available to new graduate Nurses or Nurses with less than 1 year of Nursing experience. They are designed to provide Nursing residents with the knowledge and skills to provide quality and comprehensive patient care. Most residency programs are 1 year and designed to provide new graduate Nurses with unique clinical opportunities. Nurse residents can expect to receive clinical instruction, simulation training, a clinical mentor, educational seminars and classes, and the chance to train in highly sought-after specialized areas such as the Emergency Room or the ICU.

How to Find a Good Nurse Residency Program

Finding a good Nurse residency program involves some time and research. They are found all over the country and offer many different benefits. Comparing residency programs that interest you can be done with an internet search. Many residency programs will explain what is provided within their program on their website so you can choose your best option. Things to consider when selecting a program include...

Research Facilities that Interest You

Take a look at programs in your area, or if you’re interested in relocating, look at programs in areas you’d like to live. Nurse residency programs are available all over the country, so the options for applying are endless.

Accreditation

Two organizations have begun to accredit Nurse residency programs. This means third-party organizations (AACN and ANCC) have assessed the program for its content, faculty, student satisfaction, and outcomes and certified that it meets its standards. Accredited programs are an excellent option for new graduate Nurses, but if the program you are interested in is not accredited, this does not mean that the program is a poor choice; it simply means it has not met the set requirements from these organizations and cannot claim accreditation.

Specialization

Take some time to consider a specialty that interests you. Reflect upon your Nursing school experiences, consider the areas of focus you enjoyed the most, and look for programs that allow new graduate Nurses to start within that specialty. Many Nurse residency programs offer training in areas such as the ER, specialized ICU’s, the OR, Labor and Delivery, and Pediatrics. Nurse residency programs can be a great way for inexperienced Nurses to start their Nursing careers in a specialty of choice that may otherwise not be available to them as new graduates.

Benefits of a Nurse Residency Program

There are many benefits to becoming a part of a Nurse residency program. As a new graduate Nurse, you have been given the essential foundation to function safely as a Registered Nurse, but there is much more to learn and many new skills to develop. Nurse residency programs provide new graduate Nurses with the tools they need to continue growing and developing into competent and compassionate healthcare professionals. Some of the many benefits offered by Nurse residency programs include...

Mentorship: Nurse residency programs help you develop your confidence as a new Nurse by supplying you with a Nurse mentor to help guide you through new experiences. Through mentorship with seasoned Nurses, you will gain confidence while you gain knowledge to make sound decisions confidently.

Seminars and Specialty Courses:  Nurse residency programs provide a learning curriculum centered around the specialty in which you are training. You will be provided with a schedule of classes, seminars, or online courses to complete throughout your residency to set you up for ultimate success as a new Nurse.

Certifications: Certifications are often required to work in specialty areas such as the ER, the ICU, and Pediatrics. Your Nurse residency program will help you achieve these certifications while completing your residency. Some certifications you may be required to achieve include ACLS, PALS, or TNCC.

Simulation Training: Simulation training or sim labs are a great way to help new graduate Nurses experience training opportunities that may otherwise be unavailable. Many Nurse residency programs have incorporated simulation training and testing into their curriculum to help provide new graduate Nurses with as many experiences as possible to be able to handle unexpected situations that may arise within the workplace.

Detailed Electronic Health Record Orientation: Learning how to document effectively and efficiently can be a learning curve for some new graduate Nurses. In many Nurse residency programs, a detailed electronic medical record orientation is incorporated into the curriculum to help new Nurses succeed when documenting patient care.

Curriculum and training opportunities can vary by program. Always look into what the Nurse residency program you are applying to offers to ensure you get the most out of the training opportunity.

Nurse Residency Programs Set New Grads Up for Ultimate Success

Nurse residency programs are an excellent option for many new graduate Nurses. New graduate Nurses are provided the education and support needed to transition smoothly from novice to expert through these programs. As the Nursing profession becomes increasingly sophisticated, a good Nurse residency program will set you up for a lifelong career of success in Nursing.

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Topics: nursing career, Nurse Residency Program, graduate nurse

How to Grow in the Nursing Profession

Posted by Sarah West, MSN, FNP

Fri, May 06, 2022 @ 12:30 PM

GettyImages-1252944124

One of the greatest benefits of the Nursing profession is that there are always new and emerging ways to improve our skills and reach new occupational heights. Medicine is ever-changing and with that, Nurses are also ever-changing. We must learn to adapt to new procedures, medications, technology, and equipment. These changes often unlock the potential we have to grow within the Nursing profession and there are many opportunities to grow right at our fingertips. Wherever you are in your Nursing journey there is always room to grow professionally.

Continuing Education Opportunities

Most states require Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for Nurses to renew their RN licenses. Although many Nurses may feel that completing CEUs can be a tedious and unnecessary task, they are a great opportunity to advance knowledge and skills. There are many different ways to fulfill CEU requirements including conferences, online classes, on-the-job training, independent study programs, and post-secondary degree programs. Completing CEUs with the intention to advance your skillset can be a great step in advancing your career.

 Seek a New Certification

Getting a Nursing certification is an excellent way to advance your career. There are hundreds of Nursing certification options available to all Nurses regardless of their current Nursing position. Holding certain certifications will make you more marketable to employers and allow for more opportunities. There is no limit to the number of certifications you can hold as a Nurse and each certification can help you gain a competitive advantage in your Nursing field. Some of these certifications include basic life support (BLS), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS), trauma Nursing core course (TNCC), and Wound Care Certification (WCN-C).

Organize or Join a Unit-Based Council

Unit-based councils are a professional practice model that facilitates shared decision-making between staff Nurses and Nursing management. These councils can impact policies, procedures, and processes in everyday patient care. Organizing or joining a unit-based council will promote evidence-based practices, improve patient-centered care, increase job satisfaction, improve Nurse retention, and foster professional growth and development. Participating in a unit-based council also looks great on a resume.

Join a Professional Organization

There are many benefits to joining a professional organization that can support your advancing career. Whatever your Nursing specialty, there is most likely a professional organization you can join to support your growing skills and knowledge. These organizations help Nurses achieve personal growth and development by supplying educational opportunities such as CEUs, education conferences, occupational networking, and academic scholarships. Taking an active part in these types of organizations can offer Nurses professional development opportunities including mentoring and leadership development. To choose an organization that will be the right fit for you look for a group that focuses on your chosen specialty or area of interest. 

Consider Specialization

Nurses have the opportunity to become specialized in their chosen Nursing field. Nursing certifications are a formal process in which clinical knowledge and skills are tested to demonstrate competence in a chosen specialty. Nurses can become specialized in various fields including but not limited to emergency Nursing, medical-surgical Nursing, rehabilitation Nursing, and critical care. Achieving board certification in your chosen specialty demonstrates that you are an expert in your chosen field and can lead to increases in pay, management positions, and more.

Take the Next Step in Your College Career

Educational advancement in the Nursing profession is endless and there is always room to climb the professional ladder. The Nursing profession offers a wide variety of job opportunities and with every new degree achieved, new doors can be opened. Going back to school is a big decision to make and there are many aspects to consider. There are many different paths that can be taken to advance your degree. Classes can be taken online or in-person as well as part-time or full-time. These options allow Nurses the flexibility they need to continue working while achieving their degrees.

Registered Nurses who have achieved a bachelor’s degree can decide to enroll in a graduate Nursing program and receive a master’s degree in Nursing. There are several different areas of focus Nurses can choose including a Nurse Practitioner (NP), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA), Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL), and Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM). The benefits of obtaining a graduate degree in Nursing include a pay increase as well as teaching and leadership opportunities.

In closing

Knowledge, skill, and passion are what can really drive a Nurse forward in the Nursing profession. What is most important is that you find what you are passionate about and go for it with integrity. By doing this, you will find yourself opening the door to new opportunities that will lead to your own personal journey of growth and development in Nursing.

Topics: nursing, nurses, nursing career, nursing profession

Nursing Opportunities Beyond The Bedside

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Oct 19, 2021 @ 04:39 PM

GettyImages-641755238The Nursing field offers many Nursing specialties to choose from depending on your interests and skills. And, there are plenty of opportunities to get the necessary training to move on to a different specialty.

The stress of the pandemic has increased Nurses' interest in positions beyond the hospital setting. 

Some of those opportunities include:

Nurse Educator

Nurse Educators don’t work in a traditional hospital or medical facility. They teach in universities, technical schools, and hospital-based Nursing programs. They can also work as administrators, consultants, or independent contractors.

Forensic Nurse

According to ForensicNurses.org, Forensic Nurses provide specialized care for patients who are experiencing acute and long-term health consequences associated with victimization or violence, and/or have unmet evidentiary needs relative to having been victimized or accused of victimization. In addition, Forensic Nurses provide consultation and testimony for civil and criminal proceedings relative to Nursing practice, care given, and opinions rendered regarding findings.

Many Forensic Nurses work in hospitals but they also work in community anti-violence programs, coroner’s and medical examiners offices, corrections institutions, and psychiatric facilities.

Health Policy Nurse

A Health Policy Nurse (HPN) plays an active role in forming and communicating public health policies with the goal of improving the overall well-being of society. With a strong background of hands-on Nursing expertise, HPNs are able to aid and act as policy makers within our government and healthcare systems, according to Johnson & Johnson Nursing.

Flight Nurse

Flight Nurses provide care onboard medical helicopters, airplanes, or jets often used in emergency situations to get patients to the best hospital as quickly as possible.

Flight Nurses also transfer patients between facilities. Patients might need to be moved to obtain lifesaving treatment unavailable at the original facility or to relocate to another part of the country. They also communicate with medical professionals at the receiving facility, to ensure all case notes and patient files get to the right person.

Nurse Writer

Nurse writers educate readers on healthcare topics through their personal knowledge and experience.

According to RegisteredNursing.org, they can freelance for medical journals, guides, and other health-related publications (newspapers, magazines, websites, etc.) that require accumulated knowledge, education, experience, and objectivity. Nurses can also write academic papers, write grants for hospitals or programs, coordinate programs, or assist the Communications Department in hospitals or other organizations.

Camp Nurse

Camp Nurses typically serve children or teens, in a camp environment. This can include summer camps or other camps that last from days to weeks to even months at a time, but are usually temporary.

Depending on the size of the camp, Nurses could be required to work alone or as part of a team, making critical decisions on patient care. They may also be required to obtain and keep records on allergies, medical histories, and medications of all camp participants.

Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis Nurses work with patients suffering from kidney diseases and illnesses. They administer dialysis to patients at dialysis centers, nursing homes, or at the patient's home.

Yacht Nurse

As a Nurse/Stewardess, you will be expected to maintain the on-board medical ward and Nursing station. This includes overseeing stock inventory, ordering supplies, and recording inventories. Depending on the yacht owner's health, you may be required for certain medical duties.

Although long working hours are required, the benefits are amazing with salaries often higher than other Nursing positions. Yachting is not for the faint-hearted though and you must have a sense of adventure and an urge to travel.

A Nursing career isn't always a straight path. You have the opportunity to work in a variety of different environments and grow your skills and knowledge. Take a chance and use that degree to explore your options. Discover what Nursing path fulfills and challenges you.

Topics: nursing career, nursing jobs, nursing opportunities

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