DiversityNursing Blog

Things Nurses Wish Their Patients Knew

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Mon, Oct 17, 2022 @ 02:32 PM

GettyImages-1210971758Across the entire patient experience, Nurses have a hand in almost every aspect of the patient's healthcare journey. Nurses are compassionate, and dedicated, and work tirelessly to meet the needs of their patients. Because Nurses are at the forefront of every patient interaction, there are many things that we wish our patients knew and understood about how we work and handle our everyday tasks.  

Every Patient is a Priority, but You May Have to Wait 

Nursing is a busy and fast-paced profession. Our days are jam-packed with patient care tasks, documentation, and care coordination. More often than not, it can be challenging to find time to eat, drink water, or even use the bathroom during our shifts. We hate having to make our patients wait for things they may want or need, but sometimes we wish our patients understood that we take great consideration in prioritizing our patient's needs. So, if you are asked to wait or have been waiting for something longer than you think you should have, please understand that your Nurse may have a more pressing matter to attend to, and every patient deserves our complete attention. 

Nurses are People Too 

Nurses often sacrifice their personal needs to care for their patients. As mentioned earlier, we often forgo meals and bathroom breaks to ensure we can complete all our tasks and care for your needs. Nursing can often be a thankless job. Nurses understand that you want the best quality care, and we strive to provide that to every one of our patients. Patience, understanding, and respect are all that we ask for in return. 

We Care More Than You Think We Do 

Nurses are multitaskers. At any given time, we can be juggling more tasks than you may even realize. Sometimes Nurses may come off as flustered or in a hurry, but that does not mean we do not value your wants or needs. Nurses stay late and come in on their days off to ensure their patients receive excellent care. We even think about you long after we've met because you have touched our lives. Patients are what make the Nursing profession so rewarding. We do what we do for you. 

We May Not Know Everything

We encourage our patients to ask questions, but that does not mean we have all the answers. Sometimes we may need to find the answer for you by speaking to a Doctor or collaborating with other Nurses. This does not mean we do not know what we are doing. It simply means that every patient has a different healthcare journey, and often situations arise that we may not have experience with. Our top priority is that you receive the best quality care, so if you ask a question and we do not know the answer, please rest assured that we will do everything within our power to get you the information you are looking for. 

We Do Not Judge  

Nurses do not do their jobs to judge our patients. Please always be honest when answering questions or providing your health history. Withholding information because you may be embarrassed or may not think it relevant can significantly impact the care we can provide. We care about you and want to ensure that you are cared for in the best possible way. Nurses are also prepared to take care of all your personal needs. We do not mind doing ‘gross’ or ‘embarrassing’ tasks. You do not have to say sorry for natural bodily functions. We understand and are ok with it, I promise!

The Nursing profession is a delicate blend of knowledge, compassion, and critical thinking. We strive every day to make a positive impact on the lives of our patients. A strong Nurse-patient relationship improves your healthcare experience and helps us provide you with the best quality care.

Topics: nurse-to-patient, nurse, nurses, nursing career, nursing profession, nursing workforce, nurse role, nurse communication

Increase in Number of NP’s Could Cause Problems For Hospitals

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Feb 06, 2020 @ 12:02 PM

hospitalPhysician shortage concerns has influenced the use of more Nurse Practitioners to provide primary care and fill gaps in rural areas.

According to a new Health Affairs study, the number of Nurse Practitioners grew 109% from about 91,000 to 190,000 from 2010 to 2017.

Even though Nurse Practitioners have filled gaps in the delivery of healthcare, it is creating problems for hospitals. 

The Registered Nurse workforce has been reduced by up to 80,000 RNs nationwide. Also more than one million baby-boom RNs will be retiring soon.

The study says, the growth in NPs was caused by the expansion of education programs that have attracted Millennial Nurses. The number of programs to educate NPs grew from 356 in 2010 to 467 in 2017. These programs now graduate nearly as many new NPs as medical schools do Physicians each year.

Data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey for the period 2010–2017 was used in the study and researchers found the growth of NPs occurred in every region of the country, but was particularly rapid in the east south-central region of the country, which includes Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee.

Also it is projected there will be two NPs for every five Physicians by 2030, compared to less than one NP per five Physicians in 2016. 

The number of Physician Assistants is also one of the fastest-growing in healthcare. According to a report from the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, the number of certified PAs grew over 6% in 2018 and the average salary increased by more than 12% in a four-year span.

Authors of the Health Affairs study said, "As NPs continue to expand their profile in healthcare organizations and achieve greater prominence within the healthcare workforce, the potential loss of RNs to the NP workforce is likely to continue to cause employment ripples, particularly in acute care settings. Thus, even in an era of strong RN workforce growth fueled by Millennials in particular, hospitals must innovate and test creative solutions to contend with tight or fluctuating RN staffing — as they have during past disruptions in their RN labor supply."

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Topics: nurse practitioners, registered nurses, nursing workforce, NPs, RNs

Emergency Nursing Demographics

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jun 06, 2019 @ 11:12 AM

emergencynursingThere are many specialties available to Nurses and choosing the right one can be a difficult decision. If you can work under pressure in a fast-paced and often-stressful environment while staying calm and collected, Emergency Nursing might be for you. For some people, working in the ER can be intimidating but, for others rewarding.

According to former trauma and transport Nurse Pat Carroll, “The Nursing duties are the same wherever you work, except in the Emergency department, everything is compressed.” She shares that ER Nurses are often evaluating and treating patients almost simultaneously, and they work with a team of specialists, such as radiologists and orthopedic experts, to provide the highest-quality care.

A new study shows the demographics and other findings of the Emergency Nursing workforce.

  • There are an estimated 167,375 providers of direct patient care in the Emergency/Trauma/Transport Nursing workforce.
     
  • 43% of the workforce is under 40 years old.
     
  • 78% of the workforce are women.
     
  • Compared to the overall Nursing workforce, Transport Nurses are more likely to be male.

  • 78% of the RNs surveyed hold a BSN or higher.
     
  • 58% hold specialty board certification.

  • 65% are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs and the work they do.

  • $77,500 is the median salary for Emergency/Trauma/Transport Nurses working full-time.

Working as an Emergency Nurse can be nerve-racking and emotionally draining. It also requires working long hours in a dangerous environment due to exposure to different types of pathogens and patients. However, if you’re looking for a fast-paced Nursing career where new challenges await you daily, and you can truly make a difference, Emergency Nursing may be the perfect specialty for you.

If you are an ER Nurse we would love to hear about your experiences, please comment below!

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Topics: ER nurse, nursing workforce, emergency nursing

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