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DiversityNursing Blog

Nurses Holiday Survival Guide

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Thu, Dec 14, 2023 @ 09:42 AM

Being a Nurse means you will most likely have to spend a holiday or two a year working a shift. It can be disappointing to forego your holiday traditions and festivities with your loved ones to head to work instead.

Although having to work the holidays can be difficult, it is important to remember that your presence can make a huge difference in the lives of your patients. Follow this holiday survival guide to continue spreading holiday cheer, even if you must spend the holiday in your scrubs.

Put Your Mental Health First

Nurses have a physically and emotionally exhausting job, and the emotional toll can become especially hard during the holidays. It is important to prioritize your mental health, especially during the holiday season. Set time aside to recharge before, during, and after your shift by taking a short walk, a bubble bath, or reading a good book.

Prioritizing your mental health while working the holidays will set you up to enjoy celebrations in your personal life.

Find Ways To Celebrate the Holidays at Work

Just because you must work the holidays, it doesn't mean you can't celebrate them. One of the best ways to spread the holiday spirit and enjoy your time at work is to bring the celebration into your shift.

Consider organizing a holiday party at work where everyone brings a dish to share, wear holiday accessories or scrubs, or even plan a Secret Santa with your coworkers. Although working the holidays can sometimes feel like a drag, these simple holiday traditions can make all the difference.

Think About Your Patients

If you are disappointed to be spending the holidays working and away from your family, odds are your patients are feeling the same way, maybe even worse. Be cheerful when interacting with your patients and tell them they are not alone.

You could decorate patient rooms to spread holiday cheer or help them call or Facetime their loved ones to help lift their spirits. A great way to uplift your mood is to boost the mood of others, and a little extra holiday cheer can make a huge difference in the lives of our patients.

Stay Connected to Friends and Loved Ones

It can be challenging to work the holidays instead of spending time with your friends and family, but staying connected the best way you can is essential. If possible, arrange with your loved ones to move your usual holiday traditions to a different day so you can attend. This way, you can still enjoy time together celebrating the holidays. Because at the end of the day, all that matters is time spent with loved ones, even if you celebrate the holiday on a different day.

If you work as a travel Nurse and distance is a struggle when trying to stay connected, arrange for a virtual celebration so that you can stay connected despite the physical distance.  

Splurge on a Gift for Yourself

One of the perks of working the holidays is holiday pay or bonuses. If you are working during the holidays and find yourself with a little extra cash in your pocket, consider buying yourself a gift to celebrate your hard work. Nurses put so much of their time and energy into caring for their patients. You deserve to celebrate your hard work with something special.

Prioritize your Rest to Combat Fatigue

The key to success in surviving the holidays is remembering the basics of self-care, and this includes prioritizing your rest. Caring for yourself and getting enough sleep between your holiday shifts is essential to combat the physical and emotional fatigue that comes with working a busy holiday shift. Establish a relaxing bedtime routine to help unwind and reset your mind for a good night's sleep.

Maintain Boundaries

We all know, the holiday season is a busy time of year. It can be challenging for Nurses who work off shifts to coordinate attending specific gatherings, especially when it seems like there is a gathering planned every day of the week.

 It is important to set clear boundaries between your work and personal life. When you are off-duty, focus on relaxing and enjoying the time with your loved ones and not overcommitting to social events if you need the time to recharge between your busy holiday work shifts.  

Balancing work and your personal life can be challenging, and the holidays are no different. The best way to survive the holidays is to plan appropriately and prioritize self-care so you can enjoy the season and continue to take great care of your patients.

Topics: holiday shifts, working holidays, nursing career, Nursing tips, stress during the holidays, nursing shift, nursing practice, nursing field

The Role of Nurse Educators: Shaping The Future of Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Nov 15, 2023 @ 09:51 AM

Nurse Educators play a crucial role in shaping the future of Nursing by preparing the next generation of Nurses to meet evolving healthcare needs. Their responsibilities extend beyond traditional patient care to education, mentoring, and influencing the development of Nursing professionals.

Here are some key aspects of the role Nurse Educators play in shaping the future of Nursing:

Curriculum Development

Nurse Educators are responsible for designing and updating programs to ensure they align with current healthcare standards, evidence-based practices, and technological advancements. This vital role requires them to stay up-to-date on the latest developments in the field and incorporate them into the curriculum.

In designing Nursing education programs, Educators collaborate with healthcare professionals, industry experts, and policymakers to ensure the curriculum reflects the evolving needs of the industry. They gather feedback and insights from these stakeholders to identify the knowledge and skills essential for Nurses in the current healthcare landscape.

Technological advancements also play a crucial role in shaping these programs. Nurse Educators incorporate innovative teaching methods and utilize modern technology to enhance the learning experience for students. This includes utilizing simulation labs, virtual reality, and interactive online platforms to provide hands-on training and experiential learning opportunities.

Teaching and Instruction

These professionals go beyond traditional teaching methods to deliver dynamic and engaging lectures that captivate students. They understand the importance of creating an interactive learning environment where students are actively involved in the learning process.

To enhance the educational experience, Nurse Educators incorporate a variety of teaching methods that cater to different learning styles. They utilize simulation labs to provide students with realistic scenarios where they can apply their knowledge and skills in a controlled environment. By engaging in hands-on training, students gain the confidence and competence necessary to excel in real-world situations.

Nurse Educators recognize the value of case studies in helping students develop critical thinking skills. These case studies present complex patient scenarios that require students to analyze information, make decisions, and provide appropriate Nursing interventions. By working through these scenarios, students learn to think critically and apply their theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

Throughout the teaching process, Nurse Educators encourage active participation and foster an atmosphere of collaboration. They facilitate discussions where students can share their perspectives, ask questions, and engage in meaningful dialogue. By encouraging student engagement, they create a supportive and inclusive learning environment where students feel comfortable expressing their opinions and ideas.

Mentoring and Guidance

  1. Nurse Educators act as mentors for aspiring Nurses, providing invaluable guidance and support throughout their educational and professional journeys. With their wealth of knowledge and experience, they generously share their expertise, personal stories, and valuable insights to help students develop critical thinking abilities and make well-informed decisions in the field of Nursing.

    These mentors understand the challenges and complexities that students may face as they navigate their way through their education. They offer a listening ear and a supportive presence, providing a safe space for students to express their concerns and seek advice. Through their mentorship, Nurse Educators help students build confidence, resilience, and the ability to overcome obstacles that may arise during their academic and professional careers.

    They serve as role models for their students, demonstrating the qualities and skills necessary to excel in the profession. They inspire and motivate students to strive for excellence, emphasizing the importance of compassion, empathy, and ethical practice in the delivery of healthcare. By sharing their own experiences and lessons learned, they provide students with real-life examples of the challenges and rewards of being a Nurse.

    Clinical Supervision

    Educators play a vital role in overseeing clinical experiences, ensuring students have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in practical settings. This hands-on experience is crucial for developing the skills and confidence necessary for future Nursing professionals.

    They work closely with healthcare facilities to establish clinical placements that provide diverse and meaningful learning opportunities. They collaborate with clinical coordinators and Nursing staff to identify appropriate settings where students can gain exposure to a wide range of patient populations and healthcare specialties.

    These clinical placements are carefully selected to expose students to various healthcare environments, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and community health centers. This diversity of experiences allows students to develop a well-rounded understanding of different healthcare settings and the unique challenges and opportunities they present.

    During clinical experiences, Educators provide guidance and support to students, serving as mentors and role models. They observe students during their interactions with patients, providing feedback and constructive criticism to help them improve their clinical practice. They also facilitate discussions and debriefing sessions, encouraging students to reflect on their experiences and apply theoretical concepts to real-world situations.

    They collaborate with clinical instructors and healthcare professionals to assess students' clinical competency and ensure they are meeting the necessary requirements for graduation. They also conduct regular evaluations and assessments to monitor students' progress, identify areas for improvement, and provide additional support and resources as needed.

    Professional Development

    By actively seeking out new information and resources, Nurse Educators are able to stay up-to-date on the latest breakthroughs in healthcare. They participate in professional development opportunities, such as conferences, workshops, and online courses, to expand their knowledge and skills in areas relevant to Nursing education. This ongoing commitment to learning allows them to bring fresh perspectives and innovative teaching techniques into the classroom.

    In addition to enhancing their own knowledge, they also foster a commitment to lifelong learning in their students. They understand that Nursing is a constantly evolving field, and it is essential for Nurses to continuously update their knowledge and skills to provide the best possible care. Nurse Educators encourage and facilitate ongoing professional development for their students, providing them with resources, guidance, and opportunities to pursue further education and certifications.


  2. Advocacy for Nursing Education

    Nurse educators understand the critical role Nursing education plays in shaping the future of healthcare. They are passionate advocates for Nursing education, working tirelessly at various levels to promote its importance and ensure its growth and improvement.

    At the institutional level, these Educators actively participate in policy development. They collaborate with administrators and other stakeholders to create policies that support high-quality Nursing education. By working closely with decision-makers, they can influence the allocation of resources and advocate for the necessary funding to enhance educational programs.

    They also engage in lobbying efforts at the local and national levels. They use their expertise and knowledge to advocate for policies and initiatives that prioritize Nursing education. Whether it's meeting with legislators, attending conferences, or writing letters to policymakers, Nurse Educators are dedicated to ensuring Nursing education remains a priority on the healthcare agenda.

    Cultural Competence and Diversity

    Nurse Educators understand cultural competence and diversity are essential components of Nursing education. They recognize Nurses must be prepared to provide care to individuals from diverse backgrounds and communities, as healthcare is increasingly becoming more global and multicultural.

    To emphasize the importance of cultural competence, Educators incorporate cultural awareness and sensitivity training into their curriculum. They educate students about the impact of cultural beliefs, values, and practices on healthcare outcomes. By fostering an understanding of different cultures, they equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary to provide culturally sensitive care.

    In addition to classroom instruction, they also encourage students to engage in cultural immersion experiences. They may organize community outreach programs, where students have the opportunity to interact with individuals from different cultures and gain firsthand experience in providing culturally competent care. These experiences help students develop empathy, respect, and appreciation for the diversity of their patients.

    To support diversity, Nurse Educators actively recruit students from underrepresented backgrounds and communities. They create a welcoming and inclusive learning environment where students feel valued and supported. By fostering a diverse student body, they encourage the exchange of ideas, perspectives, and experiences, which enriches the learning environment and promotes cultural competence.

    Leadership Development

    Nurse Educators play a vital role in preparing future Nurses to take on leadership positions which contribute to the advancement of Nursing practice and healthcare delivery. They understand effective leadership is essential for driving change and improving patient outcomes.

    To nurture leadership qualities in their students, they provide them with opportunities to develop and practice leadership skills. They incorporate leadership training into the curriculum, teaching students about the various leadership styles and theories. Through interactive exercises and group projects, students learn how to effectively communicate, collaborate, and make decisions as leaders.

    They also encourage students to take on leadership roles within their educational and clinical settings. They provide guidance and support as students participate in student organizations, committees, and quality improvement projects. By actively engaging in these leadership opportunities, students develop confidence, critical thinking abilities, and a sense of responsibility towards their profession.

    Nurse Educators mentor and inspire their students to become leaders in the field. They share their own experiences and insights, providing guidance on how to navigate the complexities of healthcare leadership. They encourage students to set goals, pursue advanced education, and pursue leadership positions within healthcare organizations.

  3.  

Nurse Educators play a multifaceted role in shaping the future of Nursing by not only providing quality education but also by serving as mentors, advocates, and leaders who contribute to the overall development of the Nursing profession. Their impact extends beyond the classroom, influencing the quality of patient care and the effectiveness of healthcare systems.

Topics: nurse education, nursing school, nursing program, nursing programs, Nurse Educators, nursing profession, nursing practice, nursing field

Keys To a Fulfilling Nursing Career

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Oct 20, 2023 @ 10:06 AM

A fulfilling Nursing career is often characterized by a combination of personal satisfaction, professional growth, and a positive impact on patients and the healthcare system. It is a profession that requires dedication, empathy, and a genuine passion for patient care. Nurses who find joy in helping patients, improving their health, and providing emotional support tend to be more satisfied in their roles.

Here are some key elements that can contribute to a fulfilling Nursing career:

Passion for Patient Care: A genuine passion for caring for others is at the core of a fulfilling Nursing career. This passion drives Nurses to go above and beyond their duties, ensuring that each patient receives personalized and compassionate care. It is this dedication and genuine concern for the well-being of patients that sets exceptional Nurses apart. Whether it's comforting a frightened patient, advocating for their needs, or simply lending a listening ear, Nurses with a true passion for patient care create a nurturing environment that promotes healing and instills trust. Their unwavering commitment to making a positive impact on patients' lives not only brings fulfillment to their own careers but also enhances the overall quality of healthcare delivery. With every interaction, these passionate Nurses strive to make a difference and leave a lasting impression on the lives of those they care for.

Continuous Learning and Professional Development: As the field of healthcare continues to evolve, it is crucial for Nurses to stay up-to-date with the latest medical advancements and continuously seek opportunities for growth and learning. By doing so, Nurses not only enhance their knowledge and skills but also find greater satisfaction in their careers.

One way Nurses can engage in continuous learning is by pursuing advanced degrees or certifications. These educational opportunities allow Nurses to deepen their understanding of specific areas and can open doors to new career paths and opportunities. Whether it's obtaining a master's degree in a specialized field like Gerontology or pursuing a certification in a specific area of practice, further education can provide Nurses with the knowledge and expertise needed to excel in their roles.

Moreover, continuous learning fosters a sense of professional growth and personal fulfillment. It allows Nurses to challenge themselves, expand their horizons, and push the boundaries of their capabilities. By constantly seeking new knowledge and skills, Nurses can feel a sense of accomplishment and pride in their work. They can also experience increased job satisfaction as they witness the positive impact their continuous learning has on patient care.

Variety of Career Paths: Nursing offers a wide range of career paths, from bedside Nursing to research, education, administration, specialized roles, and even entrepreneurship. The beauty of Nursing is that it provides diverse opportunities to explore and find their true calling within the field.

Finding a niche that aligns with their interests and skills can make a Nursing career more rewarding. It allows Nurses to find fulfillment in their work while making a meaningful impact in the healthcare field. Whether they choose a traditional career path or venture into less conventional roles, the possibilities within Nursing are vast and exciting.

Strong Support System: A supportive work environment and colleagues can significantly impact job satisfaction. Collaborative teams and mentors can help Nurses navigate challenges, promote a sense of belonging, and foster professional growth.

In a supportive work environment, Nurses have the opportunity to collaborate with their colleagues and form strong, cohesive teams. This teamwork not only improves patient care but also creates a sense of camaraderie and support. When Nurses feel supported by their colleagues, they are more likely to feel valued and appreciated, leading to increased job satisfaction.

Mentors also play a crucial role in career development. Having a mentor who can provide guidance, advice, and support can be invaluable. Mentors can help navigate the challenges Nurses face in their roles, offer encouragement during difficult times, and provide insights and knowledge based on their own experiences. By having a Mentor, Nurses can develop professionally and gain the confidence they need to excel in their careers.

Additionally, a strong support system can contribute to a Nurse's overall well-being. Nursing can be a demanding and emotionally taxing profession, and having colleagues and mentors who understand and empathize with the challenges Nurses face can be incredibly beneficial. They can provide a listening ear, offer emotional support, and help Nurses manage stress and prevent burnout. Nurses who feel supported in their work environment are more likely to experience a healthy work-life balance and overall job satisfaction.

Work-Life Balance: Achieving a healthy work-life balance is crucial for long-term career satisfaction. Nursing can be demanding, but it's essential to prioritize self-care and manage stress to prevent burnout.

Finding time for self-care and relaxation is necessary in preventing burnout and maintaining a sense of fulfillment. Nurses should prioritize activities that promote physical and mental well-being, such as exercise, meditation, and hobbies. Taking regular breaks and time off is also vital to recharge and replenish energy levels. By consciously making time for themselves, Nurses can prevent exhaustion and maintain their passion and enthusiasm for patient care.

A Sense of Purpose: Many Nurses find fulfillment in knowing that their work makes a meaningful difference in patients' lives. Connecting with patients and seeing improvements in their health can provide a profound sense of purpose. This sense of purpose goes beyond the everyday tasks of Nursing and transcends into the realm of making a lasting impact on someone's life.

Nurses who find purpose in their work often feel a deep sense of satisfaction and fulfillment, knowing that they are instrumental in helping patients overcome health challenges and improve their overall well-being. Whether it's witnessing a patient recover from a serious illness, helping a patient manage chronic pain, or providing emotional support during a difficult time, Nurses understand the significance of their role in the lives of their patients.

They find purpose in being a source of comfort, strength, and support for individuals and their families, knowing that their presence and care can make a meaningful difference. This sense of purpose not only brings personal fulfillment to Nurses but also drives them to strive for excellence in their practice, continuously seeking ways to improve their skills and knowledge, and ultimately making a positive impact on the lives of those they serve. 

Advocacy for Patients: Acting as advocates can be personally fulfilling for Nurses, as they witness the positive impact their efforts have on their patients' lives. It allows Nurses to make a difference in the lives of individuals and their families, ensuring that they receive the best possible care and support. Advocacy not only contributes to positive patient outcomes but also enhances the Nurse-patient relationship, fostering trust and collaboration.

Recognition and Appreciation: When Nurses feel valued and appreciated by patients, their families, and the healthcare organization, it not only boosts their job satisfaction but also motivates them to continue providing exceptional care. 

One way to recognize Nurses for their hard work and dedication is through regular acknowledgment and praise. Taking the time to acknowledge their efforts, whether through verbal recognition, written notes, or small tokens of appreciation, can make a significant impact on their morale and overall job satisfaction. When Nurses feel seen and appreciated for their contributions, it reinforces their sense of purpose and encourages them to continue going above and beyond for their patients.

In addition to individual recognition, organizations can also implement formal recognition programs to celebrate the achievements and milestones of their Nursing staff. These programs can include awards, ceremonies, or even financial incentives to reward exceptional performance. By publicly recognizing Nurses for their hard work, dedication, and the positive impact they make on patient care, organizations create a culture of appreciation and motivate Nurses to excel in their roles.

Ethical Practice: Maintaining high ethical standards and integrity in Nursing practice can contribute to a sense of pride and fulfillment. Upholding the Nursing code of ethics and making morally sound decisions is essential. It allows them to align their actions and decisions with their values, contributing to a strong professional identity and a sense of personal integrity. Nurses who practice ethically can take pride in knowing that they are upholding the highest standards of their profession and making a positive impact on the lives of their patients.

In addition, ethical practice contributes to a positive work environment and enhances teamwork and collaboration. When Nurses prioritize ethical considerations, they create an atmosphere of trust and respect among their colleagues. This promotes effective communication, shared decision-making, and a culture of safety and accountability.

Leadership Opportunities: Some nurses find fulfillment in leadership roles, where they can influence healthcare policies, drive quality improvement initiatives, or mentor others. These leadership positions allow Nurses to make a broader impact on the healthcare system and drive positive change within their organizations.

These opportunities provide Nurses with the chance to develop and strengthen essential skills, such as communication, problem-solving, and decision-making. These skills are invaluable not only in leadership roles but also in everyday Nursing practice. By honing these skills, Nurses can enhance their effectiveness in patient care and become more influential advocates for their patients and colleagues.

Ultimately, a fulfilling Nursing career is a personal journey that depends on individual values, interests, and goals. It's essential to regularly assess your career and make adjustments to align it with your evolving aspirations so you can maintain long-term satisfaction in the field of Nursing.

Topics: modern nursing, nursing career, nursing experience, nursing jobs, nursing profession, nursing practice, nursing field, fulfilling career

Nursing Trends in 2023 and Beyond

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Mon, Jul 10, 2023 @ 11:36 AM

Nurses at the forefront of healthcare continue to face challenges that change how we provide Nursing care to our patients. As the Nursing field continues to evolve, here are some of the top Nursing trends to watch in 2023 and for the years to come.

Nursing Shortages

Nursing shortages across all aspects of healthcare will continue to increase in 2023 and for several years to come. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Nurses have experienced higher rates of burnout which has led to an increased number of Nurses leaving bedside Nursing or even the Nursing profession altogether. Nurse burnout, coupled with the baby boomer generation of Nurses entering retirement, has left an increasing need for Nursing professionals across all aspects of healthcare.

To help combat the growing Nursing shortage, many Nursing programs offer rolling admissions and flexible online Nursing programs to help accommodate as many potential Nurses as possible. The World Health Organization has estimated that nearly 6 million more healthcare jobs must be filled by 2030 to meet the growing healthcare needs. We can expect the demand for Nurses to remain high for many years.

Job Availability Increases

Job availability for Nurses has been rising for several years, and 2023 will be no different. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that by 2031, job growth for Registered Nurses is expected to increase by 6% and Nurse Practitioners by 40%. Several factors will influence the increasing job availability, including the retirement of the baby boomer generation of Nurses, the growing demand for healthcare, and the inability of Nursing schools to keep up with the increasing demands of students. 

Online Nursing Programs

As the demand for Nursing professionals increases, online education programs will continue to grow in popularity. Online programs offer students scheduling flexibility to make it easier to attend classes while dealing with other responsibilities like work and family life. Online programs also create a new market for students living in rural areas who need help commuting to universities.

Travel Nursing

Travel Nursing has been a rising trend for some time, but it came into focus during the COVID-19 Pandemic. As thousands of Nurses traveled to care for the surging patient volumes in COVID-19 hot spots, it was realized how much value travel Nurses bring to the shifting demands of healthcare. Travel Nursing offers higher compensation, the opportunity to work in new environments, and travel opportunities Nurses otherwise would not be able to experience. More and more Nurses have discovered the endless perks of travel Nursing over the past few years, and there is no end in sight. We can expect travel Nursing to continue to grow in popularity.

Increased Salaries

As the Nursing shortage continues, it is expected that we will see an increase in salary for Nurses over the next few years. Adequate compensation is necessary to attract and retain qualified Nurses, recognize them for their expertise, and address their daily challenges. Although increasing salaries for Nurses involves much more than just a higher paycheck, many healthcare networks have been reconsidering healthcare budgets, government policies, and negotiations between employers and unions to help better compensate Nurses for their tireless work efforts.

Mental Health Awareness

Mental health is an essential aspect of well-being for everyone, including Nurses. The Nursing profession has always been one to carry a significant mental burden, and this can take a toll on mental health over time. Although it has been going on for decades, the pandemic revealed a devastating increase in Nurse burnout, stress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression that can no longer be ignored. In the coming years, we can expect to see an increase in mental health awareness and services available to help Nurses better prioritize their mental health. It is anticipated that healthcare organizations will start to implement initiatives to help promote self-care and work-life balance, like mental health services, stress reduction programs, and peer support networks.

Telehealth Services

Telehealth and virtual care services have exponentially increased since the COVID-19 pandemic. Nurses are now providing remote care, conducting virtual health assessments, monitoring patients remotely and offering telephonic or video consultations to help bridge healthcare gaps and improve patient outcomes. Telehealth services allow for increased access to healthcare to patients who otherwise would not have available healthcare like people from rural or underserved areas. As healthcare continues to evolve and grow, we can expect the same from telehealth services over the next few years.

Nursing trends shape the Nursing progression and can significantly impact working environments and the roles and responsibilities of Nurses. As Nursing trends continue to evolve, one thing that will always remain true about the Nursing profession is it will remain a dynamic profession that must continue to grow and adapt to new medical research, technology, and healthcare challenges.

Topics: nursing, nursing career, nursing trends, nursing profession, healthcare trends, nursing practice, nursing field, trends in nursing

The Culture of Nursing

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Wed, May 17, 2023 @ 12:32 PM

GettyImages-1403307063A positive workplace culture is essential for Nurses to provide excellent patient care. In addition, a positive workplace culture on Nursing units can positively impact job satisfaction, staff retention, and patient outcomes.

Unfortunately, in some Nursing units, bullying is tolerated, silently condoned, or completely ignored. This leads to a toxic culture and an unhealthy workplace. There is an age-old phenomenon among some Nurses called “Nurses eating their young.” This form of bullying has been viewed as a rite of passage for new Nurses, but in the end, it has resulted in devastating effects on unit morale. It can have a long-lasting impact on the self-confidence of new Nurses.

The good news is most Nursing units offer a culture of support and positivity. And thankfully, the culture of “eating your young” is slowly dissolving. Nurses see coworkers more often than family due to working long hours, overnights, or holidays, so having support and camaraderie with your colleagues is very important.

Here are some ways you can help support Nurses on your unit to increase morale and create a positive Nursing culture.

Make Friends with Your Co-Workers

Nursing can be stressful, and Nurses often experience intense situations at work. Bonding with coworkers and developing friendships can reduce stress and create a more positive work environment. After all, only Nurses can understand what other Nurses go through. Why not make friends with your Nursing colleagues so you have someone to share all the joys and struggles of the job?

Be a Role Model

The best way to encourage a positive work culture in your unit is to model positive, encouraging behavior. For example, always lend a hand to a fellow Nurse with a heavier patient load or praise a co-worker for a job well done – it’s a great way to spread positivity.

Small acts of kindness are also great ways to role model good behavior on your Nursing units. Acts of service can be as simple as answering a call bell for a fellow Nurse or offering to cover your coworker's patients so they can take their lunch break. When Nurses choose to be positive, show compassion, and respect for their fellow Nurses, we can experience a happier work environment and improve the culture of our units. 

Acknowledge Strengths

Recognizing positive behavior and a job well done is the best way to motivate your colleagues and spread positivity. Feeling valued at work encourages staff members to perform their best and go the extra mile. Empowering Nurses by appreciating everything they do goes a long way. Say thank you to your co-workers when they help you out or compliment them when a job is done well.

Have Fun!

Nurses often deal with life and death circumstances, so saying ‘have fun’ can seem a little insensitive. However, having fun at work is excellent for your mental health and can help reduce stress both on and off the job. Finding humor and laughing with co-workers can lighten the stress Nurses carry on their shoulders throughout the day. Other ideas to try on your unit could be to plan a day to match scrubs, a theme day to celebrate a holiday, or plan a potluck so everyone can enjoy a snack on their lunch break. 

Nurses are kind and compassionate with their patients. They should act the same way to their coworkers. You have the power to create an encouraging, positive culture. So go out there and spread positivity because happy Nurses provide the best care to their patients.

Topics: nursing program, nursing, nursing career, nursing staff, nursing experience, nursing profession, nursing practice

Switching Careers To Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jan 05, 2023 @ 04:07 PM

GettyImages-1287395441Thinking about changing careers? At any stage in life, Nursing is a great choice because Nurses are always in demand. It's a challenging, but rewarding field and previous education can help you become a Nurse faster.

"I'm a second career Nurse. What's wonderful about Nursing, is that it's very accessible after you've already been to school or college for another type of degree," Telemetry Nurse, Victoria told Johnson and Johnson

If you already have a Bachelor’s degree in any field, an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program is the quickest route. It usually takes less than 2 years. If you don't have a prior Bachelor’s degree, you can become a Registered Nurse (RN) with an Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN) or you can enter the workforce even quicker by becoming a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN). 

After you earn your Nursing degree, you’ll be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX), which is administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN).

There are two of the NCLEX exam: The NCLEX-RN is a computerized exam required by all state boards of Nursing to qualify for an RN license. T
he NCLEX-PN is required to practice as an LPN.

After you pass the NCLEX, you must apply to your state board of Nursing for a license to practice.

If you're asking yourself, "Am I too old to become a Nurse?" The answer is no, it's never too late to join  the Nursing workforce. According to the NCSBN, the median age of working Registered Nurses is 52 years old. 

It's also important to remember this point by Indeed, your career length doesn't reduce the impact you may bring to the unit once you work as a Nurse. Your contribution makes a huge difference regardless of how long you can be active in the field.

"If you are a baby boomer or Gen X, there’s a place in Nursing for you. Your past work experience, dedication and passion are all needed resources within the healthcare arena. As Uncle Sam once said, “We Want You!," wrote Judy McDaniel, RN, MSN in a Nurse.com article.

According to The Department of Labor, The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than 275,000 additional Nurses are needed from 2020 to 2030, and that employment opportunities for Nurses will grow at 9%, faster than all other occupations from 2016 through 2026.

This high demand is due to a variety of factors such as an increase in chronic conditions, an aging population and a stronger emphasis on preventative care.

If you have anxiety about being a new Nurse, consider one of the most important concepts taught in Nursing school, the “5 C’s” of caring: 

Commitment, Conscience, Competence, Compassion, and Confidence

Learning and adapting these concepts will allow you to provide better care and will improve the relationships you have with your patients as well as co-workers.

If you're interested in learning more about different Nursing Specialties, Click Here! 

Topics: nursing schools, nursing school, nursing program, nursing programs, nursing career, nursing jobs, nursing opportunities, nursing practice, changing careers, nursing field

Ethics in Nursing

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Fri, Oct 21, 2022 @ 10:48 AM

GettyImages-1365601656What is Nursing Ethics?

Ethics in Nursing helps Nurses maintain professional accountability and navigate the complexities of the Nursing profession. Ethics are the moral principles by which people should carry themselves. Ethics is one of the most critical concepts in Nursing as it dictates our role as caregivers.

The Nursing code of ethics consists of 4 main principles. These principles are used to guide Nurses in delivering quality Nursing care while also fulfilling the ethical obligations expected within the profession. The principles include autonomy, beneficence, justice, and non-maleficence.

Four Main Principals of Nursing Ethics  

Autonomy

Autonomy in Nursing refers to the right each patient has to make decisions based on their personal beliefs or values. As Nurses, we are responsible for educating patients on care measures and allowing them to accept or refuse medical interventions.  We must respect the choices of our patients and adapt our care to what best suits their wants. An example of autonomy in Nursing is educating a patient about the side effects of medication and allowing the patient to accept or decline taking it.  

Beneficence

Beneficence is the principle that every action performed by the Nurse should be to promote good. This means that every task a Nurse completes during her shift should be done for the sole benefit of the patient. Simple things we do in Nursing, like holding the hand of a dying patient or taking a patient outside to get fresh air, are considered beneficence.

Justice

Justice in the Nursing code of ethics means that patients have the right to impartial treatment. We do not judge our patients in the Nursing profession. Patients must be respected and treated equally regardless of their financial or insurance status, gender, age, or ethnicity. Justice in Nursing is treating all our patients equally and ensuring they receive the best possible care regardless of their situation.

Non-maleficence

Nonmaleficence is closely related to beneficence but is a different concept altogether. Nonmaleficence means that a Nurse should do no harm to the patient. This principal guides Nurses to maintain their obligation to protect their patients. Nurses should always prevent bad outcomes for their patients whenever possible by removing them from any harm. An example of nonmaleficence in Nursing is preventing medication errors by ensuring the “7 rights” of medication administration are correct or by applying a bed alarm to a patient's bed with dementia to prevent falls.

What are Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing?

The 4 main principles of Nursing ethics prepare us to deal with the ethical dilemmas we encounter while caring for our patients. Ethical dilemmas in Nursing create a conflict between 2 courses of action.  

The competing courses of action are both correct but can create different consequences that must be considered. Ethical dilemmas are important to recognize because, as Nurses, we cannot interject our personal beliefs into the ethical dilemmas at hand. Examples of ethical dilemmas can include:  

  • Protecting the privacy of an adolescent
  • A parent refusing to vaccinate their child
  • End of life decision making
  • Informed consent
  • Pro-life vs. prochoice

Becoming an Ethical Nurse

Nursing is consistently regarded as one of the most trusted professions. Nursing ethics are essential to know and understand as it helps guide our everyday Nursing practice. Nurses are thoroughly prepared to deal with the ethical situations they encounter through many years of education and training.

Nurses can continue to learn how to conduct themselves ethically and how to deal with ethical issues through continued work experiences. Every patient interaction can teach us something new about ethical dilemmas and how we can best handle them in the workplace.

Topics: nursing ethics, Ethics, nursing career, nursing profession, nurse ethics, nursing practice

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