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DiversityNursing Blog

The Role of Nurse Educators: Shaping The Future of Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Nov 15, 2023 @ 09:51 AM

Nurse Educators play a crucial role in shaping the future of Nursing by preparing the next generation of Nurses to meet evolving healthcare needs. Their responsibilities extend beyond traditional patient care to education, mentoring, and influencing the development of Nursing professionals.

Here are some key aspects of the role Nurse Educators play in shaping the future of Nursing:

Curriculum Development

Nurse Educators are responsible for designing and updating programs to ensure they align with current healthcare standards, evidence-based practices, and technological advancements. This vital role requires them to stay up-to-date on the latest developments in the field and incorporate them into the curriculum.

In designing Nursing education programs, Educators collaborate with healthcare professionals, industry experts, and policymakers to ensure the curriculum reflects the evolving needs of the industry. They gather feedback and insights from these stakeholders to identify the knowledge and skills essential for Nurses in the current healthcare landscape.

Technological advancements also play a crucial role in shaping these programs. Nurse Educators incorporate innovative teaching methods and utilize modern technology to enhance the learning experience for students. This includes utilizing simulation labs, virtual reality, and interactive online platforms to provide hands-on training and experiential learning opportunities.

Teaching and Instruction

These professionals go beyond traditional teaching methods to deliver dynamic and engaging lectures that captivate students. They understand the importance of creating an interactive learning environment where students are actively involved in the learning process.

To enhance the educational experience, Nurse Educators incorporate a variety of teaching methods that cater to different learning styles. They utilize simulation labs to provide students with realistic scenarios where they can apply their knowledge and skills in a controlled environment. By engaging in hands-on training, students gain the confidence and competence necessary to excel in real-world situations.

Nurse Educators recognize the value of case studies in helping students develop critical thinking skills. These case studies present complex patient scenarios that require students to analyze information, make decisions, and provide appropriate Nursing interventions. By working through these scenarios, students learn to think critically and apply their theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

Throughout the teaching process, Nurse Educators encourage active participation and foster an atmosphere of collaboration. They facilitate discussions where students can share their perspectives, ask questions, and engage in meaningful dialogue. By encouraging student engagement, they create a supportive and inclusive learning environment where students feel comfortable expressing their opinions and ideas.

Mentoring and Guidance

  1. Nurse Educators act as mentors for aspiring Nurses, providing invaluable guidance and support throughout their educational and professional journeys. With their wealth of knowledge and experience, they generously share their expertise, personal stories, and valuable insights to help students develop critical thinking abilities and make well-informed decisions in the field of Nursing.

    These mentors understand the challenges and complexities that students may face as they navigate their way through their education. They offer a listening ear and a supportive presence, providing a safe space for students to express their concerns and seek advice. Through their mentorship, Nurse Educators help students build confidence, resilience, and the ability to overcome obstacles that may arise during their academic and professional careers.

    They serve as role models for their students, demonstrating the qualities and skills necessary to excel in the profession. They inspire and motivate students to strive for excellence, emphasizing the importance of compassion, empathy, and ethical practice in the delivery of healthcare. By sharing their own experiences and lessons learned, they provide students with real-life examples of the challenges and rewards of being a Nurse.

    Clinical Supervision

    Educators play a vital role in overseeing clinical experiences, ensuring students have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in practical settings. This hands-on experience is crucial for developing the skills and confidence necessary for future Nursing professionals.

    They work closely with healthcare facilities to establish clinical placements that provide diverse and meaningful learning opportunities. They collaborate with clinical coordinators and Nursing staff to identify appropriate settings where students can gain exposure to a wide range of patient populations and healthcare specialties.

    These clinical placements are carefully selected to expose students to various healthcare environments, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and community health centers. This diversity of experiences allows students to develop a well-rounded understanding of different healthcare settings and the unique challenges and opportunities they present.

    During clinical experiences, Educators provide guidance and support to students, serving as mentors and role models. They observe students during their interactions with patients, providing feedback and constructive criticism to help them improve their clinical practice. They also facilitate discussions and debriefing sessions, encouraging students to reflect on their experiences and apply theoretical concepts to real-world situations.

    They collaborate with clinical instructors and healthcare professionals to assess students' clinical competency and ensure they are meeting the necessary requirements for graduation. They also conduct regular evaluations and assessments to monitor students' progress, identify areas for improvement, and provide additional support and resources as needed.

    Professional Development

    By actively seeking out new information and resources, Nurse Educators are able to stay up-to-date on the latest breakthroughs in healthcare. They participate in professional development opportunities, such as conferences, workshops, and online courses, to expand their knowledge and skills in areas relevant to Nursing education. This ongoing commitment to learning allows them to bring fresh perspectives and innovative teaching techniques into the classroom.

    In addition to enhancing their own knowledge, they also foster a commitment to lifelong learning in their students. They understand that Nursing is a constantly evolving field, and it is essential for Nurses to continuously update their knowledge and skills to provide the best possible care. Nurse Educators encourage and facilitate ongoing professional development for their students, providing them with resources, guidance, and opportunities to pursue further education and certifications.


  2. Advocacy for Nursing Education

    Nurse educators understand the critical role Nursing education plays in shaping the future of healthcare. They are passionate advocates for Nursing education, working tirelessly at various levels to promote its importance and ensure its growth and improvement.

    At the institutional level, these Educators actively participate in policy development. They collaborate with administrators and other stakeholders to create policies that support high-quality Nursing education. By working closely with decision-makers, they can influence the allocation of resources and advocate for the necessary funding to enhance educational programs.

    They also engage in lobbying efforts at the local and national levels. They use their expertise and knowledge to advocate for policies and initiatives that prioritize Nursing education. Whether it's meeting with legislators, attending conferences, or writing letters to policymakers, Nurse Educators are dedicated to ensuring Nursing education remains a priority on the healthcare agenda.

    Cultural Competence and Diversity

    Nurse Educators understand cultural competence and diversity are essential components of Nursing education. They recognize Nurses must be prepared to provide care to individuals from diverse backgrounds and communities, as healthcare is increasingly becoming more global and multicultural.

    To emphasize the importance of cultural competence, Educators incorporate cultural awareness and sensitivity training into their curriculum. They educate students about the impact of cultural beliefs, values, and practices on healthcare outcomes. By fostering an understanding of different cultures, they equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary to provide culturally sensitive care.

    In addition to classroom instruction, they also encourage students to engage in cultural immersion experiences. They may organize community outreach programs, where students have the opportunity to interact with individuals from different cultures and gain firsthand experience in providing culturally competent care. These experiences help students develop empathy, respect, and appreciation for the diversity of their patients.

    To support diversity, Nurse Educators actively recruit students from underrepresented backgrounds and communities. They create a welcoming and inclusive learning environment where students feel valued and supported. By fostering a diverse student body, they encourage the exchange of ideas, perspectives, and experiences, which enriches the learning environment and promotes cultural competence.

    Leadership Development

    Nurse Educators play a vital role in preparing future Nurses to take on leadership positions which contribute to the advancement of Nursing practice and healthcare delivery. They understand effective leadership is essential for driving change and improving patient outcomes.

    To nurture leadership qualities in their students, they provide them with opportunities to develop and practice leadership skills. They incorporate leadership training into the curriculum, teaching students about the various leadership styles and theories. Through interactive exercises and group projects, students learn how to effectively communicate, collaborate, and make decisions as leaders.

    They also encourage students to take on leadership roles within their educational and clinical settings. They provide guidance and support as students participate in student organizations, committees, and quality improvement projects. By actively engaging in these leadership opportunities, students develop confidence, critical thinking abilities, and a sense of responsibility towards their profession.

    Nurse Educators mentor and inspire their students to become leaders in the field. They share their own experiences and insights, providing guidance on how to navigate the complexities of healthcare leadership. They encourage students to set goals, pursue advanced education, and pursue leadership positions within healthcare organizations.

  3.  

Nurse Educators play a multifaceted role in shaping the future of Nursing by not only providing quality education but also by serving as mentors, advocates, and leaders who contribute to the overall development of the Nursing profession. Their impact extends beyond the classroom, influencing the quality of patient care and the effectiveness of healthcare systems.

Topics: nurse education, nursing school, nursing program, nursing programs, Nurse Educators, nursing profession, nursing practice, nursing field

FNU Makes 2023 Diversity Impact Conference Available to External Attendees

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Tue, May 16, 2023 @ 10:25 AM

Frontier-Nursing-1Versailles, Ky. – On June 8-9, 2023, Frontier Nursing University (FNU) will hold its annual Diversity Impact Conference. The Diversity Impact Conference brings together renowned thought leaders and speakers to increase awareness of the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the healthcare workforce, particularly for those working in underserved and rural communities. This year, for the first time, the conference will be available for attendees outside of FNU.

“We are extremely excited about the 2023 Diversity Impact Conference,” said FNU Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Dr. Paula Alexander-Delpech, Ph.D., PMHNP-BC, APRN. “The Conference gets better each and every year, and we are putting the finishing touches on the plan for this year’s sessions. We are most excited, however, about being able to include more attendees this year. As we grow this important event, we want to invite leaders and students from some of our area universities to join us. This event is all about collaboration, learning, and growing. I’m confident that it will benefit any university, department, or individual.”

The 2023 Diversity Impact Conference will be conducted via Zoom. The theme of this year’s conference is “Better Together: Advancing a Culture of Identity and Belonging in Healthcare.” The two-day event will feature keynote presentations on both days from nationally recognized leaders in diversity, equity, and inclusion. Additional sessions will include panel discussions, breakout sessions, and time for reflection.

The opening keynote address will be given by Dr. Tia Brown McNair, Vice President of the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success and Executive Director for the Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT) Campus Centers at the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) in Washington, D.C. On the second day of the conference, the keynote speaker will be Rebekka Eshler, National President of the Transgender American Veterans Association in Washington, D.C.  All speaker bios and the full conference schedule can be found at https://frontier.edu/diversity-impact/

The learning outcomes attendees can expect to take away from the Diversity Impact Conference include:

  • Identify specific strategies to create a culture of belonging amongst peers and the larger community
  • Discuss the causes behind healthcare disparities and their effect on creating a culture of belonging
  • Reflect on ways to effectively engage in spaces to promote diversity in identity
  • Practice ways to build collaborative communities

Students attending any institution can register for the conference for free. All others can register at the registration price of $99 until the day before the event. For more information about the 2023 Diversity Impact Conference and to register, please visit https://frontier.edu/diversity-impact/.

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About Frontier Nursing University:

The mission of Frontier Nursing University is to provide accessible nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education that integrates the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion. We transform healthcare by preparing innovative, ethical, compassionate, and entrepreneurial leaders to work with all people with an emphasis on rural and underserved communities. FNU offers graduate Nurse-Midwifery and Nurse-Practitioner distance education programs that can be pursued full- or part-time with the student’s home community serving as the classroom. Degrees and options offered include Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), or Post-Graduate Certificates. In 2021 and 2022, Frontier was named a “Great College to Work For” by the Great Colleges to Work For® program. To learn more about FNU and the programs and degrees offered, please visit Frontier.edu.

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Topics: nursing schools, School of Nursing, student nurse, nursing student, nursing students, nursing school, Frontier Nursing University, diversity, inclusion, health equity, Diversity and Inclusion, student nurses, DEI, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, diversity equity inclusion, Diversity Impact conference, conference

Exploring the Need for More Nurse Educators in Healthcare

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Apr 21, 2023 @ 11:20 AM

GettyImages-1342275996There is a growing need for more Nurse Educators to address the current shortage of Nurses and ensure the future generations of Nurses are well-trained and prepared to provide quality care.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Employment Projections 2021-2031, the Registered Nursing (RN) workforce is expected to grow by 6% over the next decade. The RN workforce is expected to grow from 3.1 million in 2021 to 3.3 million in 2031, an increase of 195,400 Nurses. The Bureau also projects 203,200 openings for RNs each year through 2031 when Nurse retirements and workforce exits are factored into the number of Nurses needed in the U.S.
 
The Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) workforce, including Nurse Practitioners, Nurse Anesthetists, and Nurse Midwives, is expected to grow much faster than average for all occupation, by 40% from 2021 through 2031, according to the BLS’ Occupational Outlook Handbook. Approximately 30,200 new APRNs, which are prepared in master’s and doctoral programs, will be needed each year through 2031 to meet the rising demand for care.

Nurse Educators play a vital role in the education and training of Nursing students and are responsible for developing and delivering curriculum, designing and implementing clinical experiences, and evaluating student progress.

The shortage of Nurse Educators at Nursing schools across the country are limiting student capacity at a time when the need for Nurses continues to grow.

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), budget constraints, an aging faculty, and increasing job competition from clinical sites have contributed to this crisis.

However, increasing the number of Nurse Educators is critical to addressing the Nursing shortage and ensuring that there are enough qualified Nurses to meet the needs of patients. 

There are several strategies that can be implemented to increase the number of Nurse Educators:

Increase Funding

Providing increased funding for Nursing education programs can help schools hire additional faculty and offer competitive salaries and benefits packages.

It's recommended, Congress pass legislation that would invest in Nursing faculty, clinical placements, and Nursing program facilities so that colleges and universities have the resources to enroll and graduate more students. 

Tuition Forgiveness

Providing tuition forgiveness or loan repayment programs for Nurses who pursue advanced degrees in Nursing education can help incentivize Nurses to become Educators. Learn more about loan forgiveness or loan repayment programs here

Mentorship Programs

Providing mentorship programs to support new Nurse Educators can help with their retention and success in the field. These programs are meant to encourage mutual professional growth between both the mentor and the mentee through a dynamic and supportive relationship.

Flexible Scheduling

People everywhere are demanding a shift toward work-life balance. Healthcare professionals are constantly working long hours, with little to no flexibility in their schedules. Offering flexible scheduling options can help attract individuals who may be interested in teaching but have other commitments, such as family or outside work.

Professional Development

Nurse Educators are tasked with nurturing the growth and education of Nurses, but they also need opportunities for growth and development. Offering opportunities for ongoing professional development, such as attending conferences or pursuing advanced degrees, can help keep Nurse Educators up-to-date on the latest Nursing practices and research.

Collaborations with Healthcare Facilities

Partnerships between Nursing schools and healthcare facilities can help provide clinical experiences for Nursing students and provide opportunities for Nurses to transition into teaching roles.

Katie Boston-Leary, PhD, RN, Director of Nursing programs at the American Nurses Association, told Becker's Hospital Review, she views it as "building a bridge" between schools and hospitals to train Nurses in real-world healthcare situations. Additionally, she said, growing an in-house team of Nurse Educators provides a pipeline for hospitals who can be actively involved in cultivating their own future workforces.

By implementing these strategies, Nursing schools and healthcare organizations can work together to address the shortage of Nurse Educators and make sure future generations of Nurses receive the education and training they need to provide high-quality patient care.

 

Topics: new nurses, new nurse, nursing school, nurse, nurses, Nurse Educators, nurse shortage, nurse training

Why You Should Work as a CNA While in Nursing School

Posted by Sarah West APRN, FNP-BC

Mon, Feb 06, 2023 @ 02:19 PM

GettyImages-588362600The Nursing profession would be nothing without the contribution of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA). Certified Nursing Assistants play a vital role in healthcare by working directly under registered and licensed practical Nurses. CNAs assist patients with daily tasks like washing, dressing, and eating. The skills you learn as a CNA can be used throughout your Nursing career and will provide you with a solid foundation for building your knowledge. Here are some of the many reasons you should work as a CNA while in Nursing school.

More Comfortable Interacting with Patients

It can be an awkward adjustment for some Nursing students to become comfortable caring for their patients' intimate and personal care needs. However, Nursing students who have worked as CNAs have first-hand experience interacting with patients and do not have to spend their time in the clinical setting adapting to patient interactions. They can instead spend their time in the clinical setting developing other Nursing skills.  

Lays an Educational Foundation

Certified Nursing Assistants must have a basic knowledge of human anatomy, nutrition, infection control, communication, documentation, and basic patient care. The basic education you learn in CNA school and while practicing as a CNA, lays a solid foundation to build upon as you further your Nursing education. In addition, Nursing students with CNA experience have a leg up on other students who have yet to have the opportunity to gain first-hand Nursing experience.  

Time Management Skills

Efficient time management is an essential skill that all good Nurses must master. While working as a CNA, you will learn how to effectively manage your time which will help you navigate the intricacies of Nursing school. Effective time management results in greater productivity, efficiency, and reduced work stress. Nursing is a demanding profession, but Nurses who effectively manage their time see the worthwhile benefits.

Ideal Nursing School Candidate

Admission into Nursing programs is becoming increasingly competitive, and many students are looking for ways to help them stand out in the enrollment process. Becoming a CNA will help lay a strong foundation in Nursing skills and help you stand out in the admissions process. The invaluable experience you will have under your belt as a CNA can set your application apart from the rest.

You’ll Experience the Realities of the Nursing Profession

The entertainment industry can glamorize Nursing as a profession. However, many of the day-to-day tasks we must perform as Nurses are far from glamorous and can be pretty disturbing to some. Some potential Nursing students may not fully understand the ‘dirty’ parts of Nursing, such as dealing with bodily fluids and helping people to the bathroom. Nursing students who have worked as CNAs have experienced the unflattering side of Nursing and are more prepared to handle the realities of the job. It takes a special person to be a Nurse, and Nurses who were once CNAs, have a deeper understanding of exactly what it takes to be a great Nurse.

Ability to Adapt

The job of a CNA can be monotonous, and care tasks are usually routine. However, even though most days are timed and planned, the needs of patients can change drastically without notice. Working as a CNA while in Nursing school can help you develop the skills and confidence needed to adapt to new situations and patient changes. The ability to adapt means that when changes occur, you can deal with the problem at hand and then reorganize your day to suit the needs of your other patients.

Working as a CNA while in Nursing school is not a requirement and is entirely optional. But the hands-on experience you will gain while working as a Certified Nursing Assistant will better prepare you for Nursing school and your future Nursing career.

Topics: nursing school, CNA, certified nursing assistant

Switching Careers To Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jan 05, 2023 @ 04:07 PM

GettyImages-1287395441Thinking about changing careers? At any stage in life, Nursing is a great choice because Nurses are always in demand. It's a challenging, but rewarding field and previous education can help you become a Nurse faster.

"I'm a second career Nurse. What's wonderful about Nursing, is that it's very accessible after you've already been to school or college for another type of degree," Telemetry Nurse, Victoria told Johnson and Johnson

If you already have a Bachelor’s degree in any field, an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program is the quickest route. It usually takes less than 2 years. If you don't have a prior Bachelor’s degree, you can become a Registered Nurse (RN) with an Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN) or you can enter the workforce even quicker by becoming a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN). 

After you earn your Nursing degree, you’ll be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX), which is administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN).

There are two of the NCLEX exam: The NCLEX-RN is a computerized exam required by all state boards of Nursing to qualify for an RN license. T
he NCLEX-PN is required to practice as an LPN.

After you pass the NCLEX, you must apply to your state board of Nursing for a license to practice.

If you're asking yourself, "Am I too old to become a Nurse?" The answer is no, it's never too late to join  the Nursing workforce. According to the NCSBN, the median age of working Registered Nurses is 52 years old. 

It's also important to remember this point by Indeed, your career length doesn't reduce the impact you may bring to the unit once you work as a Nurse. Your contribution makes a huge difference regardless of how long you can be active in the field.

"If you are a baby boomer or Gen X, there’s a place in Nursing for you. Your past work experience, dedication and passion are all needed resources within the healthcare arena. As Uncle Sam once said, “We Want You!," wrote Judy McDaniel, RN, MSN in a Nurse.com article.

According to The Department of Labor, The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than 275,000 additional Nurses are needed from 2020 to 2030, and that employment opportunities for Nurses will grow at 9%, faster than all other occupations from 2016 through 2026.

This high demand is due to a variety of factors such as an increase in chronic conditions, an aging population and a stronger emphasis on preventative care.

If you have anxiety about being a new Nurse, consider one of the most important concepts taught in Nursing school, the “5 C’s” of caring: 

Commitment, Conscience, Competence, Compassion, and Confidence

Learning and adapting these concepts will allow you to provide better care and will improve the relationships you have with your patients as well as co-workers.

If you're interested in learning more about different Nursing Specialties, Click Here! 

Topics: nursing schools, nursing school, nursing program, nursing programs, nursing career, nursing jobs, nursing opportunities, nursing practice, changing careers, nursing field

Choosing Nursing School or Medical School

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Jul 07, 2021 @ 12:14 PM

GettyImages-1270585032Many people interested in a career in healthcare originally think they’ll go to medical school and become a Doctor, but ultimately end up becoming a Nurse. Choosing between Nursing and Medical school depends on each person's career goals and what kind of studies they'd be most interested in.

It's important to explore both options because while they can be similar in some aspects, they are very different in others.

Length of Training

The length of training is a major difference. Nursing programs range from 2 years for an Associate's degree, to 4 years for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, to 6 years for a Master's. Medical school requires a minimum of 8 years of education plus residency.

Time Spent With Patients

Witnessing a loved one be taken care of by a medical professional is one reason many people choose to start a career in healthcare. If building a strong relationship with patients is meaningful to you, a career in Nursing is probably a better choice.

Often Doctors are in and out of the patient's room while the Nurse spends their entire shift taking care of a handful of patients. 

Like many of our Annual DiversityNursing.com $5,000 Education Award Winners, Shelah Roanhorse, our 2021 Winner, initially wanted to be a Doctor, but after her brother Nate became sick with cancer, she witnessed the dedication and care the Nurses gave him. She saw how involved his Nurses were with his day-to-day care. This greatly influenced her decision to become a Nurse.

Career Opportunities

There is a high demand for healthcare professionals.

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects a shortage of between 54,100 - 139,000 Physicians by the year 2033.

And, According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment of Registered Nurses is projected to grow 7% from 2019 - 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.

Doctors may be limited by their specialty area. A Nurse could be limited too depending on the specialty, but Nurses can work both in and out of the hospital in a variety of settings including...

  • Educators at Schools of Nursing
  • School Nurses
  • Insurance companies as health coaches, case managers and Nurse navigators
  • On-staff Nurses at non-healthcare companies
  • Law firms as medical forensics investigators

Leadership Roles

There is a misconception that leadership opportunities are limited in Nursing.  

Many Nurses lead initiatives to improve quality of care and patient safety. Some Nurses join their healthcare organization's C-suite and become Chief Nursing Officers or Chief Diversity Officers.  

With ongoing healthcare reform and new models of care delivery across the U.S., the role of Nurses is likely to further expand and allow them to take on new and dynamic roles in healthcare.

Whether you choose to become a Nurse or a Doctor, both careers are extraordinarily rewarding. Try to learn as much as you can about both avenues of healthcare before making your big decision.

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Topics: medical school, nursing school, medical careers, nursing career, healthcare careers

Frontier Nursing University Awarded HRSA Grants Totaling $4,140,000

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Thu, Jun 10, 2021 @ 10:05 AM

grantsVersailles, Ky. – The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded Frontier Nursing University (FNU) two grants totaling $4,140,000. The HRSA Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training grant totals $1,920,000 and the Nursing Workforce Diversity grant totals $2,220,000. HRSA, which is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, will award the funding for both grants in annual installments over the next four years. 

“We are so thrilled and thankful to have been awarded these grants by the Health Resources and Services Administration,” FNU President Dr. Susan Stone said. “These funds will enable us to expand on the important work we are already doing to address two glaring needs in our nation’s healthcare system: a shortage of psychiatric-mental health nurse providers and a lack of diversity among healthcare providers. We have been dedicated and intentional in our efforts to prepare our students to fill these needs, and the HRSA grants are verification of our leadership in these areas of focus and of our potential to make substantially more progress in the years ahead.”

The Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) grant project will be led by Dr. Jess Calohan, DNP, PMHNP-BC, Chair of FNU’s Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Department. The project period extends from July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2025, with the award for the first year totaling $480,000. The goal of the project is to increase the number of psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners who are diverse in race, ethnicity, and other underrepresented populations serving in rural and medically underserved communities through collaboration with clinical Experiential Training Site partners. The grant project will support curriculum development related to child/adolescent care, interprofessional team-based trauma-informed care, and additional telehealth simulations. Importantly, this grant will provide $290,000 annually in scholarships for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner students. 

The Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD) grant will be led by FNU Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Dr. Geraldine Young, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, CDCES, FAANP. The project period extends from July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2025, with the award for the first year totaling $555,000. The overarching goal of the NWD program is to increase the number and diversity of certified nurse-midwives across the United States who serve in rural and underserved areas in an effort to prevent and reduce maternal mortality. Central to this is the need to increase nurse-midwifery education and training opportunities for students from disadvantaged backgrounds and see them through to success. The grant provides $166,500 annually for scholarships for nurse-midwifery students of color. 

FNU’s objectives of the project are to increase its percentage of students of color (SOC) enrolled in the certified nurse-midwifery program to 30% by 2025, to retain at least 85% of nurse-midwifery SOC, and to graduate a total of  75 nurse-midwifery SOC every year during the grant period (2021-2025). Additionally, FNU aims to increase the percentage of its faculty of color to 20% by 2025 and to retain at least 85% of faculty of color during the grant period. 

“Research has shown that healthcare outcomes improve when culturally concordant care is provided,” Dr. Stone said. “These grant projects align with our own strategic plan goals to increase the diversity of our student body, our faculty, and our staff, with the understanding that doing so will improve the health care system in the U.S.”

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About Frontier Nursing University:

The mission of FNU is to provide accessible nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education to prepare competent, entrepreneurial, ethical, and compassionate leaders in primary care to serve all individuals with an emphasis on women and families in diverse, rural, and underserved populations. FNU offers graduate Nurse-Midwifery and Nurse-Practitioner distance education programs that can be pursued full- or part-time with the student’s home community serving as the classroom. Degrees and options offered include Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), or Post-Graduate Certificates. To learn more about FNU and the programs and degrees offered, please visit Frontier.edu.

Topics: nursing school, Frontier Nursing University, grants, Health Resources and Services Administration, nursing university

Nursing and Medical Schools See Rise In Enrollments

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Mar 12, 2021 @ 02:59 PM

studentnurse-1In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, higher education is seeing a rise in demand for health and medical education.

According to Kaiser Health News, enrollment in baccalaureate Nursing programs increased nearly 6% in 2020, to 250,856, shown in preliminary results from an annual survey of 900 Nursing schools by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

“It’s unprecedented,” said Geoffrey Young, senior director for student affairs and programs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. In the past two decades, the average yearly increase for total applications to medical schools has been about 2.5%, he said. This year, applications are up 18% over all.

Glen Cornwall, the Dean of Tampa Bay’s Galen College of Nursing says as people see the need in the community, they’re enrolling in greater numbers. “With this pandemic, it’s that extra urge to say this is the time," he said.

Dr. Ken Kaushansky, Dean of Stony Brook University’s Renaissance School of Medicine believes the reasons behind the surge are inspired by the pandemic and the need for financial security during a time of job loss and unemployment.

"This is my 11th year and I don’t remember us going up by 14% in any year," he said. "More typical is a 3 to 4 percent increase year over year."

Dr. Demicha Rankin, Associate Dean of admissions at the Ohio State University College of Medicine believes the influx of applicants is also a factor of the growing awareness of systemic racism.

Rankin said, “It is not just the viral pandemic but also is the awakening of the dedication to addressing racism has also been a motivation for many to try to bring equitable care to their own community."

Most schools are conducting interviews virtually so students do not have to pay for in-person travel costs.

Dr. Beth Piraino, the Associate Dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine said, "Now applicants don't have to pay to travel to interview, so they could easily interview at 20 places whereas before they may have had to restrict it."

In the midst of a global pandemic, the approach toward the academic year is very different from previous years. Nursing schools in 2021 will be a mix of online classes, in-person  clinicals, virtual and in-person simulated experiences, and some in-person and online testing.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Nursing Dean, Laura Bernaix, PhD, RN is encouraged by the increase in enrollments and believes the key to successfully adapting to this surge is the faculty.

“Great faculty, who not only are great educators in the classroom but also experts at curriculum design, are the key,” she said.

The inspiration of many to join the medical field during this extraordinary time is very touching. We can’t predict how long this trend will last, but it is certain there will always be a need for Nurses.

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Topics: nursing school, nursing school enrollment increase, COVID-19, nursing school enrollment

Johnson & Johnson Sponsors- Our Race to Health Equity Diversity Nursing Scholarship

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jan 14, 2021 @ 11:17 AM

happy

The Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association is delighted to announce a new diversity scholarship award sponsored by Johnson & Johnson. Funding may be used for tuition, fees, and books. Use the same application to apply for all FNSNA scholarships. 

Students must complete the race/ethnicity question to qualify. There is $225,000 available. Awards up to $7,500.

Click here for more information: https://www.forevernursing.org/2021-online-scholarship-applicationinstructional-sheet.html

Click here for the application: https://app.mykaleidoscope.com/scholarship/fnsna2021

Deadline is February 15, 2021

 

Topics: scholarship, diversity in nursing, nursing school, health equity, nursing scholarships, Johnson & Johnson, tuition

Nursing Schools See Spike In Applicants Since Pandemic

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jul 17, 2020 @ 03:40 PM

BSN

One positive thing to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic is the renewed appreciation for healthcare workers, particularly Nurses. This appreciation is leading to an increase in Nursing school applications.

Donna Havens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of Nursing at Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College said, “For the first time in my career, which has been a long one, folks truly get what Nurses do and they see how important and rewarding a career it is. Some would say Nurses are the glue, especially in hospitals and healthcare organizations." 

Havens believes another reason for the uptick in applications is from the record unemployment that has resulted from the pandemic. People in struggling occupations may look to Nursing as a rewarding and stable profession. 

Widener University spokeswoman Emily A Barrett said, "Historically speaking, economic downturns translate to an increase in Nursing programs due to industry stability and growth, which is projected to rise 15 percent by 2026 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics."

Sandra Russo, Chair and Director of the Nursing program at Touro College in New York said, "This year, I have 20 students on a waiting list to get into my program, so the demand is much higher."

According to US News, the number of applications to Regis College's on-ground and online Nurse Practitioner programs are currently 10% to 15% higher than normal. 

Kevin Finn, Dean of Colby-Sawyer School of Nursing and Public Health said, the one thing he sees in common on the applications is a desire to help. 

The incoming Nursing class is 34% larger than last fall's. The college will have 90 students enrolled in its Nursing program in September, an increase from 62 students last year.

The University of Kansas School of Nursing said it’s currently at capacity on applications. In fact, they’ve increased their Salina branch because of so many people who now want to be a Nurse.

Nurses are in demand. Getting into Nursing school was already extremely competitive before the pandemic. Nursing schools may become even more selective with the increase in applications. Future Nurses should focus on boosting their credentials. 

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Topics: nursing schools, nursing school, nursing programs, nursing school applications, applying to nursing school

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