DiversityNursing Blog

Choosing Nursing School or Medical School

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Jul 07, 2021 @ 12:14 PM

GettyImages-1270585032Many people interested in a career in healthcare originally think they’ll go to medical school and become a Doctor, but ultimately end up becoming a Nurse. Choosing between Nursing and Medical school depends on each person's career goals and what kind of studies they'd be most interested in.

It's important to explore both options because while they can be similar in some aspects, they are very different in others.

Length of Training

The length of training is a major difference. Nursing programs range from 2 years for an Associate's degree, to 4 years for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, to 6 years for a Master's. Medical school requires a minimum of 8 years of education plus residency.

Time Spent With Patients

Witnessing a loved one be taken care of by a medical professional is one reason many people choose to start a career in healthcare. If building a strong relationship with patients is meaningful to you, a career in Nursing is probably a better choice.

Often Doctors are in and out of the patient's room while the Nurse spends their entire shift taking care of a handful of patients. 

Like many of our Annual DiversityNursing.com $5,000 Education Award Winners, Shelah Roanhorse, our 2021 Winner, initially wanted to be a Doctor, but after her brother Nate became sick with cancer, she witnessed the dedication and care the Nurses gave him. She saw how involved his Nurses were with his day-to-day care. This greatly influenced her decision to become a Nurse.

Career Opportunities

There is a high demand for healthcare professionals.

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects a shortage of between 54,100 - 139,000 Physicians by the year 2033.

And, According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment of Registered Nurses is projected to grow 7% from 2019 - 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.

Doctors may be limited by their specialty area. A Nurse could be limited too depending on the specialty, but Nurses can work both in and out of the hospital in a variety of settings including...

  • Educators at Schools of Nursing
  • School Nurses
  • Insurance companies as health coaches, case managers and Nurse navigators
  • On-staff Nurses at non-healthcare companies
  • Law firms as medical forensics investigators

Leadership Roles

There is a misconception that leadership opportunities are limited in Nursing.  

Many Nurses lead initiatives to improve quality of care and patient safety. Some Nurses join their healthcare organization's C-suite and become Chief Nursing Officers or Chief Diversity Officers.  

With ongoing healthcare reform and new models of care delivery across the U.S., the role of Nurses is likely to further expand and allow them to take on new and dynamic roles in healthcare.

Whether you choose to become a Nurse or a Doctor, both careers are extraordinarily rewarding. Try to learn as much as you can about both avenues of healthcare before making your big decision.

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Topics: medical school, nursing school, medical careers, nursing career, healthcare careers

Frontier Nursing University Awarded HRSA Grants Totaling $4,140,000

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Thu, Jun 10, 2021 @ 10:05 AM

grantsVersailles, Ky. – The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded Frontier Nursing University (FNU) two grants totaling $4,140,000. The HRSA Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training grant totals $1,920,000 and the Nursing Workforce Diversity grant totals $2,220,000. HRSA, which is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, will award the funding for both grants in annual installments over the next four years. 

“We are so thrilled and thankful to have been awarded these grants by the Health Resources and Services Administration,” FNU President Dr. Susan Stone said. “These funds will enable us to expand on the important work we are already doing to address two glaring needs in our nation’s healthcare system: a shortage of psychiatric-mental health nurse providers and a lack of diversity among healthcare providers. We have been dedicated and intentional in our efforts to prepare our students to fill these needs, and the HRSA grants are verification of our leadership in these areas of focus and of our potential to make substantially more progress in the years ahead.”

The Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) grant project will be led by Dr. Jess Calohan, DNP, PMHNP-BC, Chair of FNU’s Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Department. The project period extends from July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2025, with the award for the first year totaling $480,000. The goal of the project is to increase the number of psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners who are diverse in race, ethnicity, and other underrepresented populations serving in rural and medically underserved communities through collaboration with clinical Experiential Training Site partners. The grant project will support curriculum development related to child/adolescent care, interprofessional team-based trauma-informed care, and additional telehealth simulations. Importantly, this grant will provide $290,000 annually in scholarships for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner students. 

The Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD) grant will be led by FNU Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Dr. Geraldine Young, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, CDCES, FAANP. The project period extends from July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2025, with the award for the first year totaling $555,000. The overarching goal of the NWD program is to increase the number and diversity of certified nurse-midwives across the United States who serve in rural and underserved areas in an effort to prevent and reduce maternal mortality. Central to this is the need to increase nurse-midwifery education and training opportunities for students from disadvantaged backgrounds and see them through to success. The grant provides $166,500 annually for scholarships for nurse-midwifery students of color. 

FNU’s objectives of the project are to increase its percentage of students of color (SOC) enrolled in the certified nurse-midwifery program to 30% by 2025, to retain at least 85% of nurse-midwifery SOC, and to graduate a total of  75 nurse-midwifery SOC every year during the grant period (2021-2025). Additionally, FNU aims to increase the percentage of its faculty of color to 20% by 2025 and to retain at least 85% of faculty of color during the grant period. 

“Research has shown that healthcare outcomes improve when culturally concordant care is provided,” Dr. Stone said. “These grant projects align with our own strategic plan goals to increase the diversity of our student body, our faculty, and our staff, with the understanding that doing so will improve the health care system in the U.S.”

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About Frontier Nursing University:

The mission of FNU is to provide accessible nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education to prepare competent, entrepreneurial, ethical, and compassionate leaders in primary care to serve all individuals with an emphasis on women and families in diverse, rural, and underserved populations. FNU offers graduate Nurse-Midwifery and Nurse-Practitioner distance education programs that can be pursued full- or part-time with the student’s home community serving as the classroom. Degrees and options offered include Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), or Post-Graduate Certificates. To learn more about FNU and the programs and degrees offered, please visit Frontier.edu.

Topics: nursing school, Frontier Nursing University, grants, Health Resources and Services Administration, nursing university

Nursing and Medical Schools See Rise In Enrollments

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Mar 12, 2021 @ 02:59 PM

studentnurse-1In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, higher education is seeing a rise in demand for health and medical education.

According to Kaiser Health News, enrollment in baccalaureate Nursing programs increased nearly 6% in 2020, to 250,856, shown in preliminary results from an annual survey of 900 Nursing schools by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

“It’s unprecedented,” said Geoffrey Young, senior director for student affairs and programs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. In the past two decades, the average yearly increase for total applications to medical schools has been about 2.5%, he said. This year, applications are up 18% over all.

Glen Cornwall, the Dean of Tampa Bay’s Galen College of Nursing says as people see the need in the community, they’re enrolling in greater numbers. “With this pandemic, it’s that extra urge to say this is the time," he said.

Dr. Ken Kaushansky, Dean of Stony Brook University’s Renaissance School of Medicine believes the reasons behind the surge are inspired by the pandemic and the need for financial security during a time of job loss and unemployment.

"This is my 11th year and I don’t remember us going up by 14% in any year," he said. "More typical is a 3 to 4 percent increase year over year."

Dr. Demicha Rankin, Associate Dean of admissions at the Ohio State University College of Medicine believes the influx of applicants is also a factor of the growing awareness of systemic racism.

Rankin said, “It is not just the viral pandemic but also is the awakening of the dedication to addressing racism has also been a motivation for many to try to bring equitable care to their own community."

Most schools are conducting interviews virtually so students do not have to pay for in-person travel costs.

Dr. Beth Piraino, the Associate Dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine said, "Now applicants don't have to pay to travel to interview, so they could easily interview at 20 places whereas before they may have had to restrict it."

In the midst of a global pandemic, the approach toward the academic year is very different from previous years. Nursing schools in 2021 will be a mix of online classes, in-person  clinicals, virtual and in-person simulated experiences, and some in-person and online testing.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Nursing Dean, Laura Bernaix, PhD, RN is encouraged by the increase in enrollments and believes the key to successfully adapting to this surge is the faculty.

“Great faculty, who not only are great educators in the classroom but also experts at curriculum design, are the key,” she said.

The inspiration of many to join the medical field during this extraordinary time is very touching. We can’t predict how long this trend will last, but it is certain there will always be a need for Nurses.

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Topics: nursing school, nursing school enrollment increase, COVID-19, nursing school enrollment

Johnson & Johnson Sponsors- Our Race to Health Equity Diversity Nursing Scholarship

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jan 14, 2021 @ 11:17 AM

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The Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association is delighted to announce a new diversity scholarship award sponsored by Johnson & Johnson. Funding may be used for tuition, fees, and books. Use the same application to apply for all FNSNA scholarships. 

Students must complete the race/ethnicity question to qualify. There is $225,000 available. Awards up to $7,500.

Click here for more information: https://www.forevernursing.org/2021-online-scholarship-applicationinstructional-sheet.html

Click here for the application: https://app.mykaleidoscope.com/scholarship/fnsna2021

Deadline is February 15, 2021

 

Topics: scholarship, diversity in nursing, nursing school, health equity, nursing scholarships, Johnson & Johnson, tuition

Nursing Schools See Spike In Applicants Since Pandemic

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jul 17, 2020 @ 03:40 PM

BSN

One positive thing to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic is the renewed appreciation for healthcare workers, particularly Nurses. This appreciation is leading to an increase in Nursing school applications.

Donna Havens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of Nursing at Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College said, “For the first time in my career, which has been a long one, folks truly get what Nurses do and they see how important and rewarding a career it is. Some would say Nurses are the glue, especially in hospitals and healthcare organizations." 

Havens believes another reason for the uptick in applications is from the record unemployment that has resulted from the pandemic. People in struggling occupations may look to Nursing as a rewarding and stable profession. 

Widener University spokeswoman Emily A Barrett said, "Historically speaking, economic downturns translate to an increase in Nursing programs due to industry stability and growth, which is projected to rise 15 percent by 2026 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics."

Sandra Russo, Chair and Director of the Nursing program at Touro College in New York said, "This year, I have 20 students on a waiting list to get into my program, so the demand is much higher."

According to US News, the number of applications to Regis College's on-ground and online Nurse Practitioner programs are currently 10% to 15% higher than normal. 

Kevin Finn, Dean of Colby-Sawyer School of Nursing and Public Health said, the one thing he sees in common on the applications is a desire to help. 

The incoming Nursing class is 34% larger than last fall's. The college will have 90 students enrolled in its Nursing program in September, an increase from 62 students last year.

The University of Kansas School of Nursing said it’s currently at capacity on applications. In fact, they’ve increased their Salina branch because of so many people who now want to be a Nurse.

Nurses are in demand. Getting into Nursing school was already extremely competitive before the pandemic. Nursing schools may become even more selective with the increase in applications. Future Nurses should focus on boosting their credentials. 

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Topics: nursing schools, nursing school, nursing programs, nursing school applications, applying to nursing school

Frontier Nursing University Virtual Event to Focus on Healthcare Team Communication and Perinatal Mental Health

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Wed, Sep 25, 2019 @ 12:28 PM

frontierVERSAILLES, Ky.—National Midwifery Week is the first week of October, and Frontier Nursing University (FNU) is celebrating by hosting a virtual event dedicated to nurse-midwifery. Featured topics include healthcare team communication and perinatal mental health. Nurse-midwives, prospective midwives and others can participate online at Frontier.edu/MidwiferyWeek

From September 29 to October 5, the Empower 2019 FNU Virtual Event: Nurse-Midwives Improving Patient Care Through Teamwork will bring together leaders in nurse-midwifery to present the following sessions:

·         Celebrating National Midwifery Week - Susan Stone, CNM, DNSc, FACNM, FAAN, President, Frontier Nursing University and President, American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM)

·         It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood: A Community-Based Approach to Improving Perinatal Mental Health - Kalena Lanuza, DNP, MSN, APRN, FNP-C, PHN, CLCI 

·         We’re All in It Together - Midwives, Nurses and Physicians: A Team Solution for a Team Problem - Cathy Collins-Fulea, DNP, CNM, FACNM, Faculty Member, Frontier Nursing University

·         Maybe there is an “I” in TEAM: IPECS - Audrey Perry DNP, CNM, Clinical Director, Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner and Nurse-Midwifery programs, Frontier Nursing University and Mark B. Woodland, MS, MD, Chair, Department of OBGYN, Reading Hospital 

·         I Wanna Be Part of the Team! Becoming a Nurse-Midwife - Tonya Nicholson, DNP, CNM, WHNP-BC, CNE, FACNM, Associate Dean of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Frontier Nursing University

Dr. Collins-Fulea will present a certified nurse-midwife-designed quality improvement project aimed at decreasing the length of stay in an obstetrical triage unit. She will discuss how improved team communication and patient engagement and the use of nurse-driven orders decreased patient time in triage and increased client and staff satisfaction. 

Dr. Lanuza’s session will explore how empowering women through a shared decision-making process, coupled with community collaboration, can improve the implementation of effective perinatal mental health practices in the obstetric setting and society at large. Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMADs) can occur in up to 20 percent of women during the perinatal period and are among the leading cause of complications associated with childbearing.

The 2019 virtual event is sponsored by Southern Cross Insurance Solutions. National Midwifery Week was created by the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) to celebrate and recognize midwives and midwife-led care. ACNM and its 7,000+ midwife members, physicians and women’s health organizations observe National Midwifery Week each year. FNU President Dr. Susan Stone is currently serving as president of the ACNM Board of Directors. 

Frontier Nursing University is the birthplace of nurse-midwifery in the United States and has 80 years of experience in delivering graduate nursing and midwifery programs. This is the fifth consecutive year FNU has hosted a virtual event in support of National Midwifery Week. 

Register for the virtual event and learn more at Frontier.edu/MidwiferyWeek

Topics: nursing school, Frontier Nursing University, FNU, healthcare team communication, Perinatal Mental Health, National Midwifery Week, Midwifery

Top Nursing Schools In 2020 for Master's and DNP Programs

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, May 22, 2019 @ 11:09 AM

nursingschools-1U.S News ranked Nursing schools with the best Nursing Master's programs and Doctor of Nursing Practice programs for 2020.

According to the U.S News site, "Seven ranking indicators are used in both the master's and DNP ranking models. The seven common factors are the four research activity indicators, faculty credentials, the percentage of faculty members with important achievements, and faculty participation in Nursing practice. The other seven indicators in each ranking use measures that are specific to each degree type." To learn more about the ranking system click here.

Best Nursing Schools: Master's

Johns Hopkins University

Duke University

University of Pennsylvania

Emory University

Columbia University

University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill

Yale University

Ohio State University

Rush University

University of Michigan--Ann Arbor

Vanderbilt University

New York University (Meyers)

University of Maryland--Baltimore

University of Pittsburgh

University of Washington

Case Western Reserve University

University of Illinois--Chicago

University of Alabama--Birmingham

University of California--San Francisco

University of California--Los Angeles

For full list click here

Best Nursing Schools: Doctor of Nursing Practice

Johns Hopkins University

Duke University

Rush University

University of Washington

Vanderbilt University

University of Maryland--Baltimore

University of Illinois--Chicago

Yale University

Columbia University

Emory University

University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill

University of Pittsburgh

Case Western Reserve University

Medical University of South Carolina

University of Michigan--Ann Arbor

University of Alabama--Birmingham

University of Iowa

University of Minnesota--Twin Cities

Ohio State University

Rutgers University--Newark

For full list click here

Best Online Master's in Nursing Programs

Johns Hopkins University

Ohio State University

St. Xavier University

Rush University

University of Colorado

Duke University

George Washington University

Medical University of South Carolina

University of South Carolina

The Catholic University of America

University of Cincinnati

University of Alabama

Ball State University

University of North Carolina--Greensboro

Stony Brook University--SUNY

University of Texas Medical Branch--Galveston

Michigan State University

University of Memphis

Oregon Health and Science University

University of Missouri--Kansas City

For full list click here

Topics: nursing schools, nursing school

Here's What I Learned By Going Back To School

Posted by Pat Magrath

Thu, Mar 16, 2017 @ 02:29 PM

5882146398_7014d39636_o.jpg.736x0_q85.jpgHave you noticed some people were born knowing what they wanted to do for a career? Not me, I didn’t have a clue. One friend in particular, never wavered. He knew from the time he was a young boy, he wanted to be a doctor. He achieved his goal and he’s an excellent one too!
 
Some people change their career path and have to go back to school. Others go back to school to advance in their current career. Whatever the reason may be, going back to school can be overwhelming and a big deal for many reasons
 
Jennifer Mensik, PHD, RN, FAAN gives us a personal look at her educational journey and shares with us a few things she learned along the way.
 
Have you gone back to Nursing school? Maybe started out in a completely different career and switched to Nursing? What’s your experience?
 
Diversity Education Award

Everyone has a reason for going to nursing school and often different reasons for continuing education beyond that. I am one of the few RNs I know at my age who decided to become a nurse when I was in high school. Living in Washington state at the time, I participated in the Running Start program, which allowed me to take college prerequisite courses at the local community college. The tuition was covered by the high school; I just paid for books. I completed my nursing school prerequisites and applied to the associate’s degree in nursing program my senior year of high school.

As a sophomore in high school, I wanted to be a nurse practitioner. I knew once I was done with my ADN, I would transfer to Washington State University for my BSN. I had even chosen my NP program. I am quite the type A personality and had my life planned in 10th grade! Interestingly, my high school counselor always questioned my decision to go into nursing. And  while progressing through nursing school, I actually did change my mind. Because I have a type A personality, changing my planned path was difficult. It was one that I didn’t fully appreciate at the time, but I am thankful for today. I often reflect and tell others about what I learned along my 12-year journey. Here are the most important pieces of my self-reflection.

Pay attention to what piques your interest

As I started my RN to BSN program, I was still bound and determined to be a nurse practitioner. However, I really didn’t like pathophysiology nor pharmacology. I slugged through the material because I needed to learn it. But then came a leadership course. And as I was reading articles, I fell in love with the content. What I noticed was that many authors, all RNs, had MBAs. This made me pause. This was something I had not considered, primarily because I had never been exposed to it. As I finished my BSN, I decided I was going to get my MBA and not be a nurse practitioner.

Many of us get preconceived ideas of what we want to do based on what we know at the time. And many of us continue down a path because we do not pause to really determine if that is what we should still do. As you think about your next steps and what you want to do, pause and think. What piques your interest? Life is too short to not do what you love.

"Many of us get preconceived ideas of what we want to do based on what we know at the time. And many of us continue down a path because we do not pause to really determine if that is what we should still do.”

You get back what you put into it

During my MBA program, I couldn’t afford the time commitment to be on campus at times, so I chose an online education. At the time, many people were weary of online programs, thinking they lacked rigor and quality. This is where you need to make your own decisions. Regardless of the program type, I have seen students do the minimum work and try to sail through courses, checking off boxes, just to get the degree. As a faculty member, it is so disheartening to see. Why are you selling yourself short? It saddens me every time I overhear nurses say they didn’t learn anything when they went back to school. I am very leery of those individuals.

During my online program, I read everything and worked hard on my papers. I knew this would prepare me to be better at whatever I did. Today, I can tell the difference when I speak with someone who put in great effort to learn compared with the one who did not. It’s difficult to fake knowledge. You either know something or you don’t. So do not just treat this as a hoop to jump or check marks on a to do list. Your time is worth more than that, so spend it learning well. The time and money you are spending on education should make you better — a better nurse, a better person and an example for others. Maybe even an example to your children.

The more you learn, the more you realize you don’t know

Once I graduated with a doctoral degree, I proudly used my new initials after my name. What was interesting is that overnight, many people saw me as an expert. The perception was I had a doctoral degree, so I must know what you I’m talking about. In many ways through my dissertation I had become an expert in a particular area. But cue imposter syndrome! I feared I was really a fraud. I had to remind myself that there was no way I would ever know everything. There is so much to learn! You literally could spend every day of your life reading research articles and never know everything. What I learned wasn’t that I knew more than others; what I learned was the more you learn, the more you realize you don’t know.

So, realize that whatever stage you are at in your career or education or years of experience, there is a world out there much bigger than you or I could ever know!  Pause and think — are you happy with what you are doing and where you are going? Are you taking advantage of learning? And realize that no one knows everything. We are all lifelong learners.

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Topics: nursing school, continuing education

Meet The Father-Son Nursing Duo

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jan 06, 2017 @ 11:23 AM

fathersonnurses.jpg
There's an old saying, "If you love what you do, you never work a day in your life." Chris Graham was working a job he didn't love and decided it’s never too late to get a job that you do love. 
 
He wanted to become a Nurse. Somehow, he managed to get his Nursing degree with 4 children to take care of at home. One of those children followed in his father's footsteps and graduated from the same Nursing School. The legacy will continue as another one of Chris's kids has been accepted to Nursing school. What a wonderful role model Chris is for his family.

A strong connection with an anesthesiologist at the mechanic shop he worked in inspired Chris Graham to pursue nursing school, but little did he know that years later, he would inspire his son to do the same thing.

Graham, a 48-year-old resident of Baton Rouge, walked across the stage to graduate from Our Lady of the Lake College in 1999, and a few weeks ago, his second son, Stefin, accomplished the same feat when he received his diploma from the newly dubbed Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University.

Chris serves as the director of Nursing at Jefferson Oaks Behavioral Health, and Stefin has been hired to work in the intensive care unit at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital.

In 1995, Chris was working at BMW of North America as a mechanic, married to a schoolteacher and the proud father of two sons, but he knew that eventually he wanted to pursue another career path.

Although he didn’t know exactly which field he would pursue, Chris began taking prerequisite courses at night while working a 40-plus hour workweek at the mechanic shop.

It wasn’t until he struck up a relationship with a local anesthesiologist who became a regular at the shop that he decided to turn toward the medical field.

“I said, ‘Doc, I can’t go to nursing school with these kids,’ and he said, ‘Aw, yeah you can. Just put your mind to it.’ Long story short, I ended up registering at Our Lady of the Lake College, and in 1996, I took my first nursing class,” Chris said.

Being accepted into the program was only the first of many hurdles he had to overcome on the long road to graduation.

“Once I got accepted into nursing school, we had two more children,” said Chris. “My wife, Jeri, was a full-time teacher, and I quit working for BMW North America and put all my efforts into nursing school. At that point, I became a stay-at-home dad, and we went from having my six-digit salary to living on a teacher’s salary, which was tough with four kids and a house. Somehow, we got through it, though, and I love what I do.”

Chris’ hard work did not go unnoticed, since he was the first person to receive the Dr. John Beven Award for graduates who exemplify the art and science of nursing, and years later his second son, Stefin, chose to pursue the same career path.

Stefin said, “I was maybe 8 or 9 years old when my dad graduated from nursing school, and I didn’t realize what a big feat that was until I was older. He didn’t just have me, he was also taking care of my two younger brothers and my older brother, so he graduated nursing school with four kids.”

Although watching his dad was inspiring, for Stefin, the decision to pursue nursing was solidified while doing service hours as a high school senior.

Stefin said, “When I was in high school, I had to do service hours, and my dad helped me get those by bringing me with him to work. He worked in a surgery center, and I would go with him to see the patients. I loved seeing what he did as a nurse, and I felt like that was the type of trade I could enjoy and pursue.”

Growing up, Stefin always felt drawn toward caretaking roles, so the unit he chose to work on was a natural fit for him.

Stefin said, “I feel like I was always called to be a caregiver to other people, and my faith teaches me that in serving others we are served. About halfway through school, we did our ICU rotations, and I really fell in love with it. You get to take care of the most vulnerable patients who often can’t speak for themselves.”

The nursing legacy of the Graham family will be continued when the fourth Graham son, 18-year-old Austin, starts classes in the fall at Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University.

For Chris, seeing his sons follow in his footsteps is an honor unmatched by little else.

Chris said, “It makes you wonder: Did they mimic and learn from me, and did I help to encourage this somehow? I teach my children to go after their own aspirations, not what other people tell them to do, so it’s been humbling to see them pursue nursing.”

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Topics: nursing school, father and son Nurses

After 2 Liver Transplants Woman Becomes Transplant Nurse

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Jun 17, 2015 @ 12:31 PM

By Erica Bettencourt

LaurieLukianov061615 resized 600

When did you first know you wanted to be a Nurse?

This story is very touching about a patient’s perspective of Nurses at a very young age. Her experience with the Nurses who cared for her over the years, made Nursing an obvious choice for her.

Laurie Lukianov, 26, is a woman from Massachusetts who received two liver transplants as a child and is now working to become a transplant nurse. She told Boston Children's Hospital's blog “There is no question in my mind. Since I was 3 years old, I wanted to be a nurse.”

Laurie was born with biliary atresia and she needed liver transplants to save her life. At 3 years old she made headlines when she became one of the first patients in the country to receive a liver transplant from a living donor -- her father, Alex Lukianov.

When she was 13, Laurie Lukianov needed a second liver transplant. It came from an organ donor, and she had to fight for her life.

"I had 13 emergency surgeries from the two-week span from the initial transplant," Laurie Lukianov said.

But she won the fight and continued on to good health with the help of her family, a great surgeon and nurses.

Now the mother to a 6-year-old boy, already works in a local emergency room and is finishing her first year of nursing school.

Laurie Lukianov is also an advocate for organ donation. She tries to let potential donors know that the medical staff will do everything to save a life. Sometimes modern medicine falls short but, the gift of life is never lost on the recipient. 

Topics: emergency room, nursing school, nurse, transplant nurse, liver transplant, biliary atresia, organ donation

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