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DiversityNursing Blog

Diversity Nursing

Recent Posts

NCSBN Annual Survey Results Infographic

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Thu, May 02, 2024 @ 09:52 AM

NCSBN Annual Survey Results Infographic

Source: https://www.ncsbn.org/research/recent-research/workforce.page

Topics: NCSBN, nursing workforce, nursing survey

Current Nursing Workforce Stats Infographic

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Wed, May 01, 2024 @ 09:51 AM

workforcestats

Source: https://bhw.hrsa.gov/data-research/access-data-tools/national-sample-survey-registered-nurses

Topics: nurses, nursing workforce, healthcare workforce

DEI Efforts: A Positive Force in the Workplace

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Tue, Mar 12, 2024 @ 10:30 AM

Rather than dismissing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) as a passing trend, we should recognize it as a natural progression. In moving forward, we need to elevate our strategies to a more deliberate, purposeful, and impactful approach.

According to the Pew Research Center, a significant number of employees have expressed that DEI initiatives have had a beneficial impact on the workplace. It comes as no surprise that among those highlighting the value of DEI efforts, many belong to marginalized groups who often face challenges in a work environment that overlooks the importance of their diverse experiences in terms of quantity and quality.

The Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp)—in partnership with HR Executive, analyzed data from over 850 respondents in organizations of all sizes, and arrived at a surprising finding, most companies aren’t slowing down their DEI initiatives, despite backlash. 

Research highlights the multitude of benefits diversity brings to organizations, including heightened profitability, enhanced creativity, strengthened governance, and improved problem-solving capabilities. Employees from diverse backgrounds contribute their unique perspectives, ideas, and experiences, ultimately fostering resilient and high-performing organizations that surpass those lacking in diversity investments.

Below we explore different ways of improving DEI efforts in the work place.

Integrate and Align Efforts

Dr. Luthra shares with Forbes that it’s hard to effectively address DEI needs in isolated pockets. It’s interconnected and needs a holistic lens. Emphasizing targets and quotas just pits people against one another. “When DEI is done right, it levels the playing field and there’s room for everyone. But we can’t skip the hard work of dismantling systems that weren’t built for everyone.”

Go Beyond Diverse Hiring

It's important to foster a culture of inclusion and belonging throughout the entire organization. This means creating spaces where all employees feel valued, respected, and empowered to bring their authentic selves to work. Implementing mentorship programs, unconscious bias training, and regular DEI education can help to cultivate a more inclusive workplace where everyone has equal opportunities to thrive.

It's essential to address systemic barriers and biases that may exist within company policies and practices to truly create a level playing field for all individuals. By going beyond just meeting hiring quotas and actively promoting a culture of diversity and inclusion, organizations can truly harness the benefits that a diverse workforce brings.

Embedding DEI Throughout The Organization

This requires a comprehensive and sustained effort that goes beyond just surface-level initiatives. It involves weaving DEI principles into the fabric of the organization, from top leadership to every employee at all levels. This means creating a culture where DEI is not just a box to check off, but a fundamental value that guides decision-making, policies, and practices.

To truly embed DEI, organizations must provide ongoing training and education for all employees to increase awareness and understanding of different perspectives and experiences. Leaders should lead by example, actively promoting and advocating for DEI in all aspects of the business. Regularly assessing and evaluating DEI efforts through metrics and feedback mechanisms can help ensure that progress is being made and that any areas needing improvement are identified and addressed promptly.

Utilize Metrics 

By collecting and analyzing data on key performance indicators related to DEI initiatives, such as employee satisfaction, retention rates, promotion rates among underrepresented groups, and diversity in leadership positions, you can effectively measure the success and effectiveness of your efforts. These metrics provide concrete evidence of the positive impact of DEI on the workplace culture, employee engagement, and overall organizational performance. Additionally, sharing these metrics with stakeholders and leadership can help reinforce the importance of DEI and drive continued support and investment in these initiatives. By regularly tracking and reporting on these metrics, you can showcase the tangible benefits of prioritizing diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

According to a Gallup Report, employees that feel connected to the culture are 3.7 times more likely to be engaged at work, 68% less likely to feel burned out and 55% less likely to be looking for work somewhere else. It appears, getting DEI right has benefits for everyone, including the business itself.

DEI is here to stay. Organizations will continue to uncover and address their obstacles to fostering inclusion and workplace equity.

Topics: Diversity and Inclusion, diverse workforce, diverse workplace culture, diversity nursing, diversity and inclusion in the workplace, DEI, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Diversity in Health Care, diversity equity inclusion

Hospital Workplace Violence: Precautions and Preparedness Techniques

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Fri, Feb 16, 2024 @ 09:07 AM

Workplace violence is a serious growing concern. Hospitals must prioritize precautions and preparedness measures to mitigate the risk of violence against staff, patients, and visitors.

According to a report  from National Nurses United, 81.6% of Nurses reported they have experienced workplace violence, with half stating they have seen instances of violence increase in the last year. 

"As a result, Nurses are subjected to multiple impacts of workplace violence, including physical and mental injury," the report summary states. "Injuries, including both physical and non-physical, can result in long-term physical and mental harm, resulting in RNs requiring medical care, taking time off work, and/or considering leaving their jobs or profession altogether." 

In total, 60% of Nurses say workplace violence has led them to change jobs, leave jobs or at least consider leaving the job or even the profession entirely, according to the report. 

Specifically, Nurses reported the following experiences to NNU: 

  • Verbally threatened 67.8%
  • Physically threatened 38.7%
  • Pinched or scratched 37.3%
  • Slapped, punched, or kicked 36.2%
  • Objects thrown at you 34.6%
  • Verbally harassed based on your sex or appearance 33.3%
  • Spat on or exposed to other bodily fluids 29.9%
  • Groped or touched inappropriate 19.8%

Around 18% noted they have not experienced workplace violence at all.

Here are several strategies hospitals are implementing to address workplace violence:

Policy Development 

Create explicit guidelines and protocols to prevent and address incidents of workplace violence. These policies should clearly state a strong stance against violence, provide mechanisms for reporting, and establish repercussions for those responsible.

Training and Education 

Ensure all staff members receive extensive training on identifying potential warning signs of violence, mastering de-escalation techniques, and effectively responding to emergency situations. It is crucial to conduct regular refresher courses to keep everyone up-to-date and well-prepared.

2024 edu award banner orange-1

Risk Assessment 

Perform comprehensive risk assessments to identify areas of susceptibility within the hospital, including emergency departments, psychiatric units, and waiting rooms. Implement focused interventions in areas with higher risk levels.

Physical Security Measures 

Enhance the overall physical security of the facility by implementing advanced security measures, including installation of state-of-the-art security cameras, panic buttons, access control systems, and ensuring optimal lighting conditions. Restrict access to sensitive areas and establish robust visitor screening protocols to further fortify the security of the premises.

Staffing and Staff Support 

To prevent overwork and fatigue, which can exacerbate tense situations, it is essential to maintain adequate staffing levels. Offering support services such as counseling and employee assistance programs can greatly assist staff in managing stress and trauma effectively.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 

Provide staff with the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) to ensure their safety in potentially volatile situations. This includes equipping them with duress alarms or protective gear, allowing them to feel secure and protected.

De-escalation Techniques 

Train all staff in effective de-escalation techniques to diffuse tense situations before they have a chance to escalate into acts of violence. Encourage staff to employ the power of verbal communication and non-confrontational body language to soothe and calm individuals who may be feeling agitated.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement 

Establish partnerships with local law enforcement agencies to enhance security measures and coordinate responses to violent incidents. If you don’t have any security staff at your place of work, consider hiring your own security staff or hire them from a security firm.

Incident Reporting and Investigation 

Promote a culture of prompt incident reporting and thorough investigations to gain insight into the underlying causes of violence. Utilize incident data as a valuable resource to shape effective prevention strategies.

Emergency Preparedness 

Establish comprehensive emergency response plans that clearly outline protocols for safely evacuating both staff and patients in the event of violent incidents. Regularly conduct drills and simulations to assess the efficacy and readiness of these plans, ensuring all personnel are well-prepared to handle any potential emergency situations.

Post-Incident Support 

Extend support and provide a wide range of resources to staff, patients, and visitors who have been impacted by workplace violence. Make available professional counseling services, essential medical care, and follow-up assistance fit for their individual needs.

By implementing these precautions and preparedness measures, hospitals can begin to create safer environments for their staff, patients, and visitors while effectively managing the risk of workplace violence.

Topics: safety, safety gear, workplace violence, nurse safety, violence in the workplace, workplace violence prevention, workplace violence prevention program, safety culture

Why Representation in Nursing is Important

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Fri, Dec 01, 2023 @ 09:32 AM

In the dynamic realm of healthcare, the significance of representation in Nursing cannot be overstated. Nurses are the backbone of healthcare, playing a pivotal role in patient care, advocacy, and community health.

As the profession continues to evolve, it is imperative the Nursing workforce reflects the diversity of the populations it serves.

Representation in Nursing goes beyond demographic statistics. It encompasses a rich tapestry of backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives that contribute to a more culturally competent approach to providing care. 

Here are a few reasons why representation in Nursing is important: 

Cultural Competence 

Patients come from diverse cultural backgrounds, and having Nurses who reflect this diversity helps in providing culturally competent care. Culturally competent Nurses understand the nuances of different cultural practices, beliefs, and values, leading to better communication and improved patient outcomes.

This cultural competence extends beyond language barriers and encompasses a deep understanding of the social, religious, and traditional aspects that shape a patient's identity and healthcare needs. When Nurses are able to appreciate and respect these cultural nuances, they can tailor their care to meet the unique needs of each patient.

For example, a Nurse who understands the cultural significance of certain foods in a patient's diet may be able to provide alternative options that are more appropriate, ensuring the patient feels heard and understood. Additionally, a Nurse who is aware of cultural norms around personal space and touch may adapt their approach to physical examinations to make the patient more comfortable.

Building Trust 

Patients often feel more comfortable and trusting when they see healthcare professionals who share similar backgrounds or experiences. This connection goes beyond the surface level, creating a sense of understanding and empathy that fosters a stronger therapeutic relationship. When patients can relate to their Nurses on a personal level, it encourages open communication, allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of their healthcare needs. This trust is not only essential for effective healthcare delivery, but it also plays a significant role in patient satisfaction and overall well-being.

Imagine a patient who is hesitant to share personal information or discuss sensitive health concerns with a Nurse who they perceive as distant or unable to comprehend their unique circumstances. However, when that patient encounters a Nurse who shares similar experiences or cultural background, a sense of relief washes over them. They feel validated and understood, knowing their Nurse has likely faced similar challenges or obstacles. This creates a safe space for open dialogue, enabling the Nurse to provide the most accurate and tailored care possible.

When patients can connect with their Nurses on a personal level, it humanizes the healthcare experience. It reminds patients their Nurses are not just medical professionals, but individuals who have their own stories, struggles, and triumphs. This shared humanity strengthens the therapeutic bond, allowing patients to feel seen, heard, and respected. It empowers them to actively participate in their healthcare decisions and collaborate with their Nurses to achieve optimal outcomes.

Reducing Health Disparities

Having a diverse Nursing workforce is crucial in addressing the disparities in healthcare access and outcomes certain populations may experience. By understanding and addressing the unique healthcare needs of different communities, a diverse Nursing workforce can contribute to more equitable healthcare delivery.

Health disparities can arise from a variety of factors, including socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geographic location, etc. These disparities can lead to differences in access to healthcare services, quality of care, and health outcomes. For example, individuals from marginalized communities may face barriers such as language barriers, lack of culturally competent care, and limited access to healthcare facilities.

By having a diverse Nursing population that reflects the communities they serve, healthcare organizations can better understand and address these barriers. Nurses who come from similar backgrounds or have experience working with diverse populations can help bridge the gap between patients and healthcare services. They can provide culturally competent care, advocate for the unique needs of their communities, and promote health equity.

A diverse workforce also brings a range of perspectives and experiences to problem-solving. This diversity of thought can lead to innovative solutions for addressing healthcare disparities. Nurses who have firsthand experience with the challenges faced by certain populations can bring valuable insights to the table and help develop effective strategies for improving healthcare access and outcomes.

Improved Communication 

Language barriers and differences in communication styles can significantly impact the delivery of healthcare services. Effective communication between healthcare providers and patients is crucial for accurate diagnosis, treatment, and overall patient satisfaction. Nurses who are proficient in the same language as their patients or have a deep understanding of their communication norms can play a vital role in enhancing the quality of care by ensuring clear and accurate information exchange.

When language barriers exist, it can lead to misunderstandings, misinterpretations, and potential errors in healthcare delivery. This can be especially challenging when discussing symptoms, medical history, treatment options, and medication instructions. Nurses who are fluent in the same language as their patients can bridge this gap and facilitate effective communication, ensuring patients fully understand their condition, treatment plan, and any necessary lifestyle modifications.

Understanding the communication norms of patients from different cultural backgrounds is equally important. Communication styles can vary greatly across cultures, and what may be considered appropriate or respectful in one culture may not be in another. Nurses who are aware of these cultural norms can adapt their communication approach to ensure patients feel comfortable, heard, and respected. This not only enhances patient satisfaction but also promotes a more trusting and collaborative relationship between the Nurse and patient.

Enhancing Innovation 

Diversity in Nursing brings a variety of perspectives and approaches to problem-solving, fostering a culture of innovation and creativity within healthcare organizations. When Nurses from different backgrounds and experiences come together, they bring with them a wealth of knowledge and unique insights which can lead to development of groundbreaking solutions to address the complex challenges in healthcare.

A diverse Nursing workforce encourages collaboration and the exchange of ideas. When individuals with different backgrounds and experiences work together, they can learn from one another and combine their expertise to create innovative solutions. This cross-pollination of ideas can spark creativity and lead to the development of novel approaches that may not have been considered otherwise.

Career Aspirations and Role Modeling 

Representation in Nursing can inspire individuals from underrepresented groups to pursue careers in healthcare. When aspiring Nurses see professionals who look like them, it can serve as a powerful motivator and provide role models who have successfully navigated similar paths. This representation not only encourages diversity within the Nursing profession but also helps to address the disparities in healthcare access and outcomes that certain populations may face.

When individuals from underrepresented groups see Nurses who share their backgrounds and experiences, they are more likely to believe that a career in Nursing is attainable and they can overcome any barriers or challenges they may face. Seeing successful role models who have paved the way can instill a sense of possibility and determination in aspiring Nurses, empowering them to pursue their dreams and make a difference in healthcare.

Representation in Nursing can help break down the stereotypes and biases that may exist within the healthcare industry. By showcasing diverse Nurses who excel in their careers, it challenges the notion certain groups are not capable or qualified to pursue healthcare professions. This can lead to a more inclusive and equitable healthcare system, where individuals from all backgrounds have equal opportunities to succeed and contribute.

Policy and Advocacy 

Diverse representation in Nursing leadership and professional organizations is a critical aspect of influencing policy development and advocacy efforts in the healthcare industry. When decision-making tables are filled with individuals from a variety of backgrounds and experiences, it ensures policies are comprehensive and address the needs of all patients and healthcare professionals.

By including diverse perspectives in policy development, organizations can ensure the unique challenges and barriers faced by different populations are considered. This allows for the creation of policies that are inclusive, equitable, and responsive to the diverse needs of patients and healthcare providers.

Diversity in Nursing leadership and professional organizations can help shed light on the disparities that exist within the healthcare system. By amplifying the voices of underrepresented groups, these organizations can advocate for policy changes that address these disparities and work towards achieving health equity for all.

Having a variety of perspectives at the decision-making table also ensures policies are informed by a wide range of experiences and knowledge. This diversity of thought can lead to more innovative and effective solutions to the complex challenges facing the healthcare industry. By incorporating different viewpoints and ideas, organizations can develop policies that are forward-thinking and adaptable to the rapidly evolving healthcare landscape.

Representation in Nursing is not just about fairness and equal opportunities; it is an essential component of providing high-quality, patient-centered care. A diverse Nursing workforce contributes to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and a healthcare system that is better equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population.

Topics: diversity in nursing, diversity in healthcare, diverse workforce, cultural diversity, diverse nurse, diversity in leadership roles, diversity nursing, Diversity in Health Care, diversity equity inclusion, representation

EEO-1 Data Collection Deadline

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Mon, Sep 11, 2023 @ 11:56 AM

In a recent announcement, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has provided employers with an updated deadline to submit their essential demographic data.

With the commencement of the EEO-1 Component 1 data collection for the year 2022 set for October 31st, employers will now have until December 5th to file their crucial EEO-1 reports.

This extension allows companies ample time to gather and analyze the necessary information to ensure accurate and comprehensive reporting, promoting transparency and fairness in the workplace. By adhering to these deadlines, employers can contribute towards fostering a diverse and inclusive workforce, ultimately leading to greater opportunities and equitable treatment for all employees.

The EEO-1 Component 1 report is a mandatory annual data collection that requires all private sector employers with 100 or more employees, and federal contractors with 50 or more employees meeting certain criteria, to submit demographic workforce data, including data by job category and sex and race or ethnicity to the EEOC. 

The 2022 EEO-1 Component 1 Instruction Booklet is now available at the following link https://www.eeocdata.org/pdfs/2022_EEO_1_Component_1_Instruction_Booklet.pdf

All updates about the 2022 EEO-1 Component 1 data collection, including the updated 2022 EEO-1 Component 1 Data File Upload Specifications, will be posted to www.eeocdata.org/eeo1 as they become available. The EEOC anticipates posting the updated 2022 EEO-1 Component 1 Data File Upload Specifications for filers on Wednesday, September 13, 2023.

Race data: According to SHRM, currently, the categories for race on the EEO-1 form are White, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, Asian, American Indian or Alaska Native, or 2 or more races. Hispanic or Latino is categorized as an ethnicity, not a race, on the form.

Some comments in court documents in the Supreme Court's recent affirmative action case suggested the race categories in the EEO-1 form are overly broad, so they might be revised in the future. EEOC spokesman Victor Chen confirmed that the race categories won't change for the 2022 data collection.

"While the EEOC has participated in the Interagency Technical Working Group (ITWG) that's looking at revising the race and ethnicity categories, the ITWG is expected to complete their revisions next year by summer 2024," said Rachel See, an attorney with Seyfarth in Washington, D.C.

Pay data: According to HRdrive, employers are not required to report pay data as part of Component 1. Pay data collection as part of EEO-1 Component 2 remains on hold; EEOC last collected Component 2 in 2018 and has not renewed the collection since.

A 2022 report commissioned by EEOC and conducted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine examined the agency’s 2018 pay data collection and determined the data “may be used effectively” to address pay discrimination, but the agency has not announced any future pay data reporting requirements.

Topics: demographics, EEO data

Mental Health Self Care Checklist and Resources for Nurses

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Sat, May 06, 2023 @ 09:39 AM

GettyImages-1359149467May is mental health awareness month, a time to raise awareness and promote education about mental health, as well as reduce the stigma associated with mental illness. Did you know, 1 in 5 American adults experience a mental health condition in a given year?
 
Self-care is essential for Nurses to maintain their well-being and improve their mental health so they can provide the best possible care for their patients. Here's a checklist for Nurses looking to begin their self-care journey :

  • Get enough sleep: Aim to get 7-8 hours of sleep.
  • Eat a healthy diet: Make sure to eat a balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein.
  • Stay hydrated: Drink plenty of water.
  • Exercise regularly: Aim to get at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise most days of the week.
  • Take breaks: Take short breaks throughout your day to rest and recharge.
  • Practice mindfulness: Try incorporating mindfulness exercises into your daily routine, such as deep breathing or meditation.
  • Connect with colleagues: Connect with colleagues who understand the challenges of being a Nurse. You can talk to them about work-related stress and share coping strategies.
  • Seek professional help: If you're struggling with your mental health, seek professional help from a mental health provider. This can be a therapist, psychiatrist, or psychologist.
  • Use employee assistance programs: Many healthcare organizations offer employee assistance programs that provide confidential counseling and support services.
  • Set boundaries: It's important to set boundaries and say no to additional responsibilities if you're feeling overwhelmed.
  • Pursue hobbies and interests: Make time for activities that bring you joy and help you relax, such as reading, listening to music, or practicing a hobby.
  • Take care of your physical appearance: Dress in clothes that make you feel comfortable and confident, and take pride in your appearance.
  • Practice gratitude: Take time each day to reflect on what you're grateful for, whether it's a supportive colleague, a successful patient outcome, or simply the beauty of nature.

Resources

  • Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs): Many hospitals and healthcare facilities offer EAPs that provide free, confidential counseling services to employees.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI): NAMI offers support groups, educational resources, and advocacy for individuals and families affected by mental illness.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): SAMHSA offers a national helpline, treatment referral service, and resources for mental health and substance abuse disorders.
  • Crisis Text Line: This free, 24/7 text messaging service provides support for individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Text "HOME" to 741741 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Mindfulness apps: Apps like Headspace, Calm, and Insight Timer offer guided meditations and mindfulness exercises to help reduce stress and improve mental well-being.

Remember, self-care is an ongoing process, and it's important to make it a priority in your life. By taking care of yourself, you'll be better equipped to care for your patients and thrive in your career as a Nurse.

Topics: mental health, nurses, self-care, mental health awareness, stressed nurses, nurses mental health

Erasing Racial Disparities in Maternal Health

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Mon, Apr 17, 2023 @ 10:41 AM

GettyImages-1285268973Maternal health disparities are a significant problem in the United States. Women in America are dying at a higher rate from pregnancy-related causes than in any other developed nation. Black women are three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women.

According to the Center for Health Care Strategies, Black infants are more than twice as likely to die within the first year of life as white infants. Native Americans/Alaska Natives, Asian Pacific Islanders, and subgroups of Latina women and children also fare worse than white families when it comes to maternal and child health outcomes.

Reducing racial disparities in maternal health requires a multilayered approach that addresses the underlying social causes of health and institutional racism.

Here are some strategies that could help erase racial disparities in maternal health:

Increase Access to High-Quality Prenatal Care

Black women are less likely to receive early and regular prenatal care than white women, which can lead to higher rates of complications during pregnancy and childbirth. Improving access to high-quality prenatal care can help reduce these disparities.

Address Structural Racism in Healthcare

Structural racism in healthcare, including implicit bias among healthcare providers, contributes to maternal health disparities. This racism means African American women often receive poorer quality care than white women. It means the denial of care when African American women seek help when enduring pain or that health care and social service providers fail to treat them with dignity and respect. This issue requires training healthcare providers to recognize and address their own biases and implementing policies that promote equity, culturally competent care and justice.

Increase Awareness and Education

Raising awareness of these disparities and educating the public, healthcare providers, and policy makers can help reduce disparities. This includes addressing the impact of systemic racism and the social determinants of health that contribute to poor maternal health outcomes.

Address Social Determinants of Health

Social determinants of health, such as poverty, lack of access to healthy food and safe housing, and limited access to transportation, can all impact maternal health outcomes. Improving these underlying issues can positively impact maternal health outcomes for all women.

Invest in Maternal Health Research

Investing in research on maternal health disparities can help identify effective approaches and programs. This includes studying the impact of implicit bias, the effectiveness of community-based interventions, and the impact of policies that address social determinants of health.

In conclusion, racial disparities in maternal health is complex and cannot be resolved overnight. This requires a comprehensive approach that addresses underlying social determinants of health and institutional racism. By implementing these strategies, we can work towards improving maternal health outcomes for all women, regardless of race.

Topics: maternal health, racial disparities, maternity care

Advice For New Nurses

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Thu, Apr 06, 2023 @ 10:23 AM

GettyImages-1400028194Congratulations on starting your Nursing career! Here are some pieces of advice that may help you as a new Nurse:

Never stop learning

Nursing is a constantly evolving field and there are always new things to learn. Attend continuing education classes, read Nursing journals, go to Nursing conferences, join Nursing associations, and stay up-to-date on the latest research.

Get to know your teammates 

Don't hesitate breaking the ice, introduce yourself, others are probably wondering who this new person is! Once you get to know everyone, try keeping a close group of people you can rely on and talk to when need be. Every one needs a helping hand or shoulder to lean on time and again. 

Sara Lentz DNP, MSN, RN, CNL at Heritage Dignity Health said, "Get to know everyone you work with, from the top to the bottom of the organizational structure. It doesn’t matter if someone is cooking, providing bedside care, or a chief — everybody is there for a common goal and a part of your work family.”

Don't be afraid to ask questions

As a new Nurse, it's okay to not know everything. Ask your colleagues and mentors for help when you need it.

Mary Erickson, RN, Clinical Care Leader at Sanford Health said, "Even after 34 years in the ICU, there is still plenty for me to learn and there will be for you, too. A Nurse who asks a lot of questions and continues to expand their knowledge and expertise will undoubtedly provide good, quality care to patients."

Be organized

Nursing can be a busy and demanding profession, so it's important to be organized. Develop a system for keeping track of your tasks, and prioritize your to-do list. Try taking notes or use a Nursing report sheet, so you can ensure you're always on top of your game.

Stay calm

One of the most important things a new Nurse can do is to remain calm under pressure. When difficult situations arise, it is a Nurse’s job to provide a sense of calm for their patients and their families.

Develop good communication skills

Effective communication is essential in Nursing. Learn how to communicate clearly and effectively with your colleagues, patients, and their families.

“Look at your patient so you notice their nonverbal communication. Find ways to assess fine motor skill where they don’t notice it. For example, when working home health have them reach for pen when signing paperwork. My assessment begins the minute I enter their room or when they open the door. Use ALL of your senses! Actively listen to patients and their family," says Nurse Kay.

Take care of yourself

Burnout in Nursing is common as it's a physically and emotionally demanding job. It's critical you take care of yourself. Get enough rest, eat a healthy diet, enjoy your social life, exercise regularly, and find ways to manage stress.

Be compassionate

Don’t ever forget, you're in the profession of caring. It's important to be compassionate toward your patients and their families. Treat each patient as an individual, with their own unique needs, fears, and preferences.

Build a support network

This career can be challenging, so it's important to have a support system of colleagues, friends, and family members who understand what you're going through.

“Being a Nurse will change your life. It changes your outlook on a lot of things--makes you more passionate about some, thankful for some and just down-right mad about others,” Nina Vella, RN, at St. Edward Mercy Medical Center said, adding that the best part of being a Nurse is “getting to genuinely make a difference in someone’s life. When a patient tells you ‘thank you for saving my life,’ you can’t help but to be proud. When you get to watch a patient that you didn’t know would live or not walk out of a hospital and know that you are a part of the reason they can live again, you can’t explain the feeling!”

Nursing is a rewarding profession that allows you to make a real difference in people's lives. With compassion, great communication skills, an inquisitive and confident nature, a good support network, and a commitment to stay healthy both mentally and physically, you will become an excellent Nurse and make a positive impact on the world.

Topics: new nurses, new nurse, nursing, nursing career, nursing experience, nurse advice, nursing opportunities

Diversity Recruitment Strategies For Nursing

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Mon, Mar 06, 2023 @ 02:07 PM

GettyImages-1372866989Hiring Nurses who reflect Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) is an important step towards creating a healthcare system that is accessible and welcoming to all patients, regardless of their race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic.

Here are some strategies that healthcare organizations can use to improve DEI in their Nursing workforce:

Develop A Diverse Recruitment Plan

Health Systems should develop recruitment strategies that target a Diverse pool of candidates. This may involve partnering with community organizations, attending job fairs and career events that attract a Diverse group of people, and actively recruiting from underrepresented communities.

Get Involved In Your Community

If you aren’t already involved in your community, it’s time to get started. Sponsor community information sessions such as signs to look for regarding specific illnesses including diabetes, weight control, high blood pressure, etc. See if there’s a local chapter of the NBNA (National Black Nurses Association), NAHN (National Association of Hispanic Nurses), AMN (American Men in Nursing) and become a member. Sponsor a local chapter recruiting event or attend their national conferences. Reach out to the schools in your area to get high school and college kids aware of the career opportunities available in healthcare. Your community is full of potential patients and employees so get your Diversity, Equity and Inclusion message out there in your community.

Consistent Communication

It is important that both your internal and external communications consistently promote your inclusive environment. Be honest and welcoming. Don’t be shy. It’s that simple!

Use Inclusive Language In Job Postings

Those responsible for hiring should use inclusive language in their job postings to attract a more Diverse pool of candidates. This includes using gender-neutral language, avoiding language that may be exclusive or discriminatory, and highlighting the organization's commitment to DEI.

Provide Cultural Competence Training

Healthcare organizations should provide cultural competence training to all employees, including management. These trainings can help staff understand the unique needs and perspectives of patients from all different backgrounds, and provide them with the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally responsive care.

Foster An Inclusive Workplace Culture

It is important to foster an inclusive workplace culture where all employees feel valued and appreciated. This may involve implementing policies and practices that promote Equity and Inclusion, providing opportunities for professional development and advancement, and creating a safe and supportive work environment.

Measure And Track DEI Progress

Management should be measuring and tracking their progress towards Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion goals. This may involve collecting and analyzing data on the Diversity of the Nursing workforce, as well as conducting regular employee surveys to gauge their experiences and perceptions of the workplace culture.

Topics: recruitment, recruiting, Diversity and Inclusion, healthcare organizations, nurse recruitment, nursing workforce, DEI, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, healthcare recruitment

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