DiversityNursing Blog

Nursing Scholarships

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Nov 10, 2017 @ 02:56 PM

NursingScholarships.png

In addition to our DiversityNursing.com Annual $5,000 Education Award, we thought it would be helpful to provide a list of other scholarships that might be of interest to you.

Good Luck!

AACN Scholarship $2,500- https://www.hurstreview.com/AACN

ACLS Medical Training Scholarship Program $1,000-   https://www.aclsmedicaltraining.com/scholarship/

Advancing Men In Nursing Scholarships- http://www.aamn.org/resources

AfterCollege-AACN Scholarship Fund $2,500- https://www.aftercollege.com/content

American Cancer Society Graduate In Cancer Nursing Practice Scholarship $20,000- https://www.cancer.org/research

Asian American/ Pacific Islander Nurses Association, Inc. Scholarships- http://aapina.org/scholarship-awards/

BestNursingDegree.com Scholarship $2,500- http://www.bestnursingdegree.com

Deloras Jones RN Scholarship Program- https://www.scholarsapply.org/delorasjones/

Elizabeth J Davis Scholarship $3,000- http://vnavt.com/elizabeth-j.-davis-scholarship/

Equality Scholarship $6,000- http://www.equalityscholarship.org/

FNSNA Undergraduate Scholarship Program- http://www.forevernursing.org/undergraduate-scholarships.html

Gladys D Goodson Scholarship $2,500- http://www.lcf.org

Health Careers Scholarship Program $7,500- https://www.gallagherstudent.com/scholarship/

Healthcare Leadership Scholarship $2,000- http://www.healthgrad.com/scholarships

HealthGrad.com Leadership Scholarship $2,000- http://www.healthgrad.com/scholarships

IMPACT Technology Recruiting Scholarship $1,000- http://go-impact.com/payments

Jean Andrews Nursing Scholarship $1,200- http://www.vsac.org/pay

Kentucky Nursing Incentive Scholarship Fund $3,000- http://kbn.ky.gov

Kings Daughters Health Foundation Health Career Scholarship $2,500- http://www.kdhealthfoundation.com/scholarships

Madeline Pickett Cogswell Nursing Scholarship $2,500- http://www.dar.org/national-society/scholarships

Medsite Medical Scholarship $5,000- https://www.medsitemedical.com/scholarships/

Mildred Nutting Nursing Scholarship $2,000- http://www.dar.org/national-society/scholarships

NAHN Scholarships- http://nahnnet.org/NAHN/About/Scholarships

National CPR Association Scholarship $2,000- https://www.nationalcprassociation.com/scholarship/

NBNA Scholarships- http://www.nbna.org/content

Nurse Plus Academy $1,000- http://nurse.plus/#scholarship

Nurse.org Healthcare Leaders Scholarship $1,000- http://nurse.org/healthcare-leaders/

Nursing.org Scholarships $2,000- http://www.nursing.org/scholarships/

Oliver Joel And Ellen Pell Denny Healthcare Scholarship $3,000- https://www.wsfoundation.org

Perinatal Graduate Nursing Scholarships $5,000- https://www.marchofdimes.org/nursing

Philippine Nurses Association of America, Inc. Scholarship $2,000- http://www.mypnaa.org/News

Professional Caretakers Scholarships $1,500- https://professionalcaretakers.com/scholarship/

Sarah Margaret Macdonald Nursing Scholarship $6,000- https://s-caf.org/index.php

The Genvieve Renn Roscher Nursing Scholarship $1,000- http://johnrandolphfoundation.org

The Meland Foundation Nursing Scholarships $2,000-$5,000- http://melandfoundation.org

The Nurses Foundation of Wisconsin, Inc. Scholarship $2,000- http://wisconsinnurses.org/education/scholarships/

The Rick And Sherry Murray Medical Futures Scholarship $5,000- http://webfl.alsa.org/site

Transcultural Nursing Society Scholarships- http://www.tcns.org/Foundationawards.html

Travel Nurse Source Scholarship $2,000- https://www.travelnursesource.com/resources/scholarship/

Western Governors University Scholarships- https://www.wgu.edu/tuition_financial_aid/scholarships/nurses

Click Here to register for our $5,000 Education Award!

Click Here To Register For 2018

Topics: nursing scholarships

Hospital Fall Prevention Tips

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Nov 07, 2017 @ 10:43 AM

HE-AA393_IMMOBI_J_20170908161830.jpgAs a Nurse, you have long been committed to reducing and preventing patient falls. In fact, call lights, checklists and risk assessments are just a few types of fall-related tools that you've become accustomed to. While these strategies have improved patient safety, it’s time to start thinking differently about how we approach falls.

According to EBSCO, Fall prevention remains one of the most challenging patient safety initiatives in any healthcare setting. Notwithstanding the risk for patient injury or death, a fall with injury is expensive and the estimated average cost is $14,000 (TJC, 2015). Falls and trauma were identified by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as preventable adverse events. CMS will not reimburse hospitals if falls and trauma occurred as a secondary hospital acquired-condition.

Below are some tips from Brigham and Women's Hospital that may prevent future falls.

  • Fall and injury risk assessments for each patient
  • More sensitive bed alarms or chair alarm to help alert staff that a patient is getting up and may need assistance
  • Video, informational brochure, communication signs to inform patients and families about fall risks and how to be safe in the hospital
  • Patient Comfort Rounds, which includes routine safety checks on each patient by the nurse or care assistant to make sure that the patient:
    • Is comfortable and pain is controlled
    • Receives assistance with toileting and other personal or special needs
    • Is assisted with re-positioning in the bed or chair
    • Can reach personal items
  • Is in a safe environment
  • Discussions with pharmacists and doctors to review and adjust certain medications as needed if a patient is at high risk for falling
  • Communicating the risk for falls, injuries from a fall, and a safety plan to patients/families and other members of the health care team
  • Having no more than three side rails up on the bed at any one time to allow patients an easy pathway out of the bed
  • Mobility supports and assistive devices that meet the patient's needs
Have more questions or concerns about fall prevention? Click below to submit your question to our Nurse Leaders!
Click Here To Ask Question

Topics: fall prevention, preventing falls

Quality Patient and Nurse Safety

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Oct 30, 2017 @ 03:43 PM

nurse-safety.jpgNurses are a constant presence at the bedside and regularly interact with physicians, pharmacists, families, and all other members of the health care team but, physicians may spend only 30 to 45 minutes a day with even a critically ill hospitalized patient. This means Nurses have the critical role in ensuring a patient's safety.

Nurses ensure their patient's safety by monitoring them for clinical deterioration, detecting errors, understanding care processes, and performing countless other tasks. There are many ways to help you achieve quality safety for yourself and your patients. Here are a few...

Nurse-to-patient ratios

According to Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, assigning increasing numbers of patients eventually compromises a Nurses' ability to provide safe care. Several seminal studies have demonstrated the link between Nurse staffing ratios and patient safety, documenting an increased risk of patient safety events, morbidity, and even mortality as the number of patients per Nurse increases. The strength of these data has led several states, beginning with California in 2004, to establish legislatively mandated minimum Nurse-to-patient ratios; in California, acute medical–surgical inpatient units may assign no more than five patients to each registered Nurse.

Safe and healthy workplace

OSHA, which enforces the Occupational and Safety Health Act of 1970, ensures employers are providing a safe and healthy workplace for workers and comply with OSHA’s regulations. Some of the obligations include:

• Complying with your employer’s policies and procedures based on its obligations under OSHA;

• Using personal protective equipment, including masks, when indicated;

• Informing your Nurse manager and others designated in the facility policy of workplace violence (e.g., bullying, intimidation, verbal abuse);

• Using proper body mechanics when lifting, pushing wheelchairs or otherwise working with patients;

• Reducing risks for slips, trips or falls by removing obstacles, wiping up wet walking surfaces and wearing shoes that support your feet and your walking;

• Speaking with your Nurse manager and CNO when policies and procedures governing safety are not being followed.

Overtime and long shifts

It is common for hospitals and clinics to request that their Nursing staff work overtime. While working overtime can be an effective solution to a Nursing shortage, it also can present a number of problems. Nurses risk becoming burned out, tired and/or stressed if they take on too much overtime.

 A study conducted by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System showed working a 12-hour shift or working overtime was related to having trouble staying awake during the shift, reduced sleep times and nearly three times the risk of making an error. The most common medication errors identified in the study due to Nurse fatigue were wrong doses, dose omission and extra doses.

Communication

Health care teams that communicate effectively and work togehter reduce the potential for error, resulting in an improved clinical performance. According to the American Hospital Association,  A key aspect in improving teamwork and communication in health care is engaging patients and families. Increasingly, research shows a correlation between increased patient and family engagement and fewer adverse events. Determining how patients and families want to be involved in their care and then engaging them in designing their plan of care increases their understanding of tests, procedures, and anticipated care outcomes, including a successful discharge.

If you have any questions about patient or staff safety, please click below to ask your question and a Nurse Leader will respond.
Click Here To Ask Question

Topics: patient safety, nurse safety

Nurses Team Together To Invent Device For Infants

Posted by Andy Rosen

Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 12:11 PM

24nurses01.jpgEvery day we see aspects of our job that can be done better. Improvements can be made to the way we do many things and the materials we use. We’re often so busy, we think to ourselves there must be a better way to do our charting, administer meds, etc, but we’re too busy to actually do anything about it so we go with the same old routine.
 
Here's a story about a Nurse seeing a need for improvement, having a creative idea, and seeing her idea become a much needed device to improve healthcare for babies.

This article written by By from the Boston Globe- Maggie McLaughlin’s path from nurse to entrepreneur started last year when an IV tube became unhooked from an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit at Tufts Medical Center, where she works, causing the child to begin bleeding unexpectedly.

A specialist in IV procedures, McLaughlin was asked to study ways of preventing such an incident from happening again, and she learned there is no universally accepted tool to safely lock the line onto an infant’s tiny body.

“It left me wondering,” she said. “There’s got to be something we can do. There’s got to be a better way.”

Since then McLaughlin has been working to develop an IV connection that lies flatter on an infant’s skin and holds more securely to the needle than the alternatives on the market today. She has teamed up with a former nurse she met at a Northeastern University event to form a company called IV Safe T to make and market the device.

24nurses05.jpgMcLaughlin is among a number of nurses — with the help of programs from nursing schools and their own hospitals — who are using their bedside experience to develop new products and innovations in the medical industry.

Rebecca Love, director of the year-old Nurse Innovation and Entrepreneurship program at NU, said research has shown that nurses spend a significant portion of each shift using workarounds and making impromptu fixes to ineffective processes or equipment. One simple example is using medical tape to secure a device that doesn’t sit right on a patient’s body.

Such adaptations take up time that could otherwise be devoted to patient care, but they also demonstrate creativity that can be channeled into developing new tools and procedures to improve the delivery of medicine.

The NU program, which connects nurses to resources and guidance to help them carry out their ideas, said it has attracted 1,600 people to events it has held, and it has connected at least 20 nurses to business mentors. It is also beginning a certificate program this winter.

Meanwhile, Massachusetts General Hospital provides grants to nurses and other patient care workers who have ideas to improve the way the facility operates. One nurse at MGH, Jared Jordan, is using the grant program to develop a harness that will allow patients to use the bathroom on their own without risk of falling. He came up with the idea after a patient took a bad spill at the hospital, slowing his recovery.

Patients understandably want privacy while they use the toilet, even when they are so weak they are at risk of falling. The goal of the product is to provide enough stability that nurses can stand watch from outside the bathroom.

Jordan said he is still working out what his business relationship with MGH will be if the product comes to fruition. His main goal is not so much to make money, but to help solve the big problem of falls in hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutional settings.

“I love being a bedside nurse, and I couldn’t imagine not doing that,” Jordan said. “I want this product to take off because I just think it’s going to be so impactful.”

These programs strive to put nurses on equal footing with other professions, including doctors, who are commonly seen as the most likely innovators in medicine. “Nursing historically has not been at the top of the hierarchy,” said Tim Raderstorf, chief innovation officer at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, which has a studio where students, faculty, and staff can test out ideas. “Although we are the largest profession in health care, we tend to have the least influence when it comes to making decisions.” That can be a major factor in determining whether nurses stay in their jobs. Research by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has found that nurses who have autonomy and feel involved in decision-making say they are more likely to stay in their jobs.

Some who follow innovation in health care say nurses represent a relatively untapped reservoir of expertise about improving patient care.

“Doctors aren’t really trained to do the business of medicine. They’re trained to be doctors, but they run practices, and they start businesses,” said Paulina Hill, principal at the venture firm Polaris Partners. “It’s the same with nurses. There’s nothing really that limits them from innovating.”

McLaughlin calls her device “Lang lock,” after her maiden name. The rounded device connects tubing to an IV catheter with a single twist, and it has one flat side to make the needle approach the skin at a lower angle so it sits more securely.

She has teamed up with Melinda J. Watman, a former nurse who later got an MBA and went into business, to start their own company. She works on the business in her spare time from the kitchen table at her Chelmsford home, and still clocks three, 10-hour shifts a week at the Tufts Floating Hospital for Children in Boston.

So far, McLaughlin and Watman have spent about $5,000 of their own money to make a prototype. NU has been helping them to protect their intellectual property and study the market. The pair are exploring how to pay for the more daunting costs of getting regulatory approval, which could exceed $10,000. That might happen through a licensing agreement, or finding someone to bring the product to market by selling any patents they receive.

They believe the product could also benefit adults, because they’ve designed to be easier to connect and to reduce the risk of irritation and skin tearing even on larger bodies.

McLaughlin, who describes herself as a “worker bee,” said the rapid immersion in the business of medical devices has been “eye opening.”

“Going in, doing my job well, making sure that every patient I contact has what they need — that’s been my specialty,” she said. “So when it comes to the whole business part, it’s a learning curve that I’ve been taking baby steps and baby strides to.”

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Topics: infant, nurse inventor, medical device

Conflict Resolution in Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Oct 20, 2017 @ 12:19 PM

The+truth+about+the+handshake.jpgWorkplace conflict is common across all industries especially in a fast paced and stressful field like Nursing. Conflict mediation can be complex and typically Nurse managers step in to help resolve the problem.

Acoording to Nurse.com, conflict is a disagreement between two or more people who differ in attitudes, beliefs, values, feelings or needs. It’s a part of every work environment, including healthcare organizations. The ingredients of conflict include:

 
  • Needs. These are essential to wellbeing; therefore, conflict can arise when needs are not met. Not to be confused with desires (what we would like), needs are vital elements.
  • Perceptions. People interpret situations differently. Misperceptions can cause a breakdown in communication, leading to conflict.
  • Power. How people define, interpret and use power can greatly influence conflict. Conflict may arise when one person seeks to influence or exert power over another.
  • Values. Values are beliefs that a person deems important. Serious conflicts can occur when people hold incompatible values.
  • Feelings and emotions. People often let emotions dictate how they react in a given circumstance. Conflict can arise when people let their feelings lead the way, or if another person’s feelings are ignored or devalued. It’s important to separate emotions from the issue.

Below are a few suggestions on how to best deal with workplace disputes and dilemmas.
 

Gather Info And Meet With Both Parties

Nurse Jenkins from thenursespeak.com says, issues are often brought up as a one-sided story, influenced with subjective data like emotions or perceptions. Other times, the issues presented may be missing essential information, such as objective data that can paint a clearer picture of what actually happened.

Make sure you do your best to understand the entire situation before reacting. In many cases, getting the whole story will help alleviate the conflict immediately, as the problem can be more clearly identified and addressed appropriately.

Journalist Susan M. Heathfield from The Balance, believes meeting both parties separately is unwise because Nurse managers run the risk of becoming biased to one opinion. The most effective way to resolve conflict is for managers to discuss the incident with both parties in the same room, affording them both an equal amount of time to state their case. This approach promotes fairness and balance, more effectively paving the way for a peaceful resolution.

Conflict Resolution Training

According to onlinedegrees.bradley.edu, an important strategy Nurse managers should implement is to hold conflict resolution training sessions for Nursing staff so that any minor conflicts can be resolved successfully by Nurses themselves. This approach is important because there will be times when Nursing staff has to work without the supervision of a manager. Training sessions could involve acting out hypothetical conflicts and then work as a group toward a resolution.
 

Hire The Right People For Your Team

An article by elearning.loyno.edu, says hiring people, especially in healthcare management and leadership roles who demonstrate a strong skillset in resolving and managing conflict is the first step in the right direction.

Effective healthcare systems management relies on hiring the right people for your culture and workplace. When hiring employees, consider whether they have a proven history of efficiency and teamwork. Ask questions around what they would do in specific situations involving conflict, and listen to the way they describe how they have managed similar occurrences they’ve dealt with in the past.

Conflict can’’t be avoided, but it can be solved. Although avoidance sometimes seems like the easy way out, facing conflict head-on in an appropriate and professional manner will lead to better relationships, a more productive work environment and empowerment. We hope these suggestions help with any future conflicts that may arise.

What has helped you solve a conflict at work? Comment below and tell us what has worked for you in the past.

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Topics: conflict resolution, workplace conflict

Disaster Response Gives Retired Nurse New Purpose

Posted by Johnson&Johnson

Thu, Oct 12, 2017 @ 11:12 AM

NP-DN_4.jpgArticle from www.discovernursing.com

With the many horrific disasters happening across the country, have you considered how you can help? Of course you have. You’re a Nurse and that’s what you do – care for others. This is a terrific interview of a Nurse who retired a year ago and is now volunteering for the Red Cross. Her skills are desperately needed. Perhaps her story will inspire you.

Mary Yoshino, FNP, wore an identification badge for years that told the world who she was and what she represented in the healthcare community. When she retired from being a nurse, Mary wasn’t sure what her next step would be, but she knew she wanted to continue to help people.

Currently, Mary is on the ground in Houston, Texas, volunteering in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, an extremely destructive Category 4 Atlantic hurricane that made landfall in southern Texas in August 2017. We recently had the opportunity to speak with her to learn more about her career and her current role as a volunteer disaster response nurse.

Nursing Notes (NN): Can you share a little bit about your nursing background?

Mary: All my life, I wanted to be a nurse. As a student nurse at Johnston-Willis Hospital School of Nursing in Richmond, Va., I became very active with the American Red Cross by taking and teaching classes. Since graduation, my nursing career has spanned 47 years in all areas of nursing and multiple states. I have worked in intensive care units and emergency rooms, college health services, and the Army Nurse Corps Reserve. I went back to school to become a nurse practitioner in 1990, and then worked as a family nurse practitioner for 26 years before retiring last year at the age of 69. I took this past year to reflect on what I wanted to do in my next phase of life.  

NN: What made you want to volunteer during Hurricane Harvey, and how did you get involved?

Mary: I received a text from my son in Friendswood, Texas, saying that his home was taking on water and that he and his family were evacuating. That morning, I signed up to volunteer with the Red Cross. I was so desperate to help people again and was deployed out of Albany, N.Y., to Houston with a team of four other nurses.

NN: What are your day-to-day responsibilities as a volunteer nurse?

Mary: Currently, I’m a supervisor for a 460-resident shelter facility. We’re responsible for going from cot to cot, making rounds and assessing residents’ health needs daily. We are doing dressing changes, distributing over-the-counter medications, and calling for prescription refills. Some of our patients are very sick; yesterday alone we called 911 four times. We talk to our patients, hear their stories, and hold back our tears as we wipe away theirs. Our day is busy. There’s no time to sit, and very little time to eat because our patients’ needs come first.  

NN: What is the most rewarding aspect of this volunteer role?

Mary: The most rewarding aspect is to see the gratefulness in the eyes of the people we help. They come in feeling dehumanized, as they have lost all that they hold dear. Some cry and some are quiet, but they see that we care and we talk to them about the realness of their situation and ask them quietly how we may help them. Today, I was with a woman who teared up and said, "You really care, don't you?" A kind smile, manners, and showing respect goes a long way.

NN: What did you take away from this experience?

Mary: This experience has inspired me to go back and work in our local Red Cross chapter, to be a spokesperson for the Red Cross and to encourage others to volunteer. Even on a local front, there are so many ways to help.

NN: What do you wish others knew about the impact that Hurricane Harvey has had on citizens and communities?

Mary: My team has seen firsthand the destruction around Houston and realized just how real this hurricane was and how it has changed the lives of so many. As other breaking news has developed, people here are still feeling the effects of Harvey and are coming together in the communities that were hit the hardest. In my son's community, all homes were destroyed, but they went door to door helping each other. It’s about people helping people.

NN: What advice do you have for other nurses who are interested in disaster response nursing?

Mary: Let's do it!!! Be there, hold a hand, wipe a tear, make people feel human and safe again. Think back to why you became a nurse, and let those reasons once again come to the front. Let's go make a difference.

NN: Is there anything else you’d like to share about this experience?

Mary: When I retired from nursing, I broke down emotionally. I did not know who I was besides a nurse practitioner. The Red Cross has given me my life back. I feel like I have found my niche. I came to Houston and realized that I can still make a difference. I will return home in mid-October after having been in Houston for a month. In November, I hope to be deployed somewhere again. This time, I will go in knowing I have the confidence to lead and make a difference for the victims of a disaster.

To learn more about volunteering as a nurse through the Red Cross, visit www.redcross.org.  

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Topics: first responders, retired nurse, natural disasters, disaster response

Frontier Nursing University Hires Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Thu, Oct 05, 2017 @ 02:25 PM

Header_712x230.jpgHyden, KY -- Frontier Nursing University (FNU), a graduate school offering nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner programs through distance education, has hired Dr. Maria Valentin-Welch, DNP, MPH, CNM, FACNM, as its first chief diversity and inclusion officer to lead the University on matters of equity, diversity and inclusion. Dr. Valentin-Welch is a certified nurse-midwife and has served as a course coordinator at FNU since 2013. She will assume the new role on October 1, 2017. 
 
officer.jpgFNU’s chief diversity and inclusion officer (CDIO) will lead the development of a vision and strategy that champions the importance of a diverse and inclusive environment that values and supports all members of the University community. The addition of the CDIO position is the most recent of a number of diversity initiatives implemented as part of FNU’s strategic plan to heighten the focus on diversity and inclusion for all faculty, staff and students. The CDIO will serve on the executive team along with the president, dean, chief operations officer and the executive vice president for finance and facilities.
 
“Research tells us that in order to incorporate an effective culture of diversity and inclusion, you must have top administrators at the highest level in the organization leading the charge,” says FNU President Dr. Susan Stone. “We have done so much to foster a culture that values diversity and inclusion; this was the natural next step for our University.”  
 
Dr. Valentin-Welch has worked on diversity and inclusion efforts throughout her career. One of her first assignments at FNU will be leading the implementation of a four-year program to increase the recruitment, enrollment, retention and graduation of students from disadvantaged backgrounds, made possible by a HRSA Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant totaling $1,998,000 that was awarded to FNU earlier this year.
 
Dr. Valentin-Welch joined the Frontier Nursing University faculty four years ago and has served as a co-chair of FNU’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee. She will be moving to Kentucky in 2018 to join other administrative staff at FNU’s campus, which will be relocating from Lexington to Versailles next year.
 
“I am very excited to get started in this new role because focusing on diversity and inclusion will only strengthen Frontier’s roots, as well as our mission and vision,” said Dr. Valentin-Welch. “The birthplace of nurse-midwifery in the United States stems from the roots of Frontier Nursing University. Therefore, I am humbled and honored to become FNU’s first chief diversity and inclusion officer. Together, hand in hand, we will bring our FNU Community to higher heights.”
 
Additionally, Dr. Valentin-Welch will offer leadership support to FNU’s Diversity PRIDE Program which has been in place since 2010 and was designed to promote diversity in nursing and midwifery by recruiting more underrepresented students. She will also focus on collaborative opportunities with other organizations to facilitate the goals of diversity and inclusion at FNU.
 
“I believe our founding mother, Mary Breckinridge, is smiling down at Frontier as we open this new historical chapter… a chapter made up of many different pages creating a wonderfully diverse and inclusive book,” said Dr. Valentin-Welch. 
 
Contact: Brittney Edwards, Director of Marketing and Communications
859-899-2515, [email protected]
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Topics: Frontier Nursing University, Diversity and Inclusion, chief diversity officer

Burnout in Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Oct 04, 2017 @ 11:24 AM

20170405_cover.jpgBurnout amongst Nurses isn't a new thing. In fact, it could be getting worse. With a combination of Nurses retiring and an influx of aging patients, this can become too much to handle and some will leave their profession.

According to Fierce Healthcare, several stressors lead to high levels of pressure and Nurse burnout.  These include:

  • High patient acuity (years ago, these patients would have been in the ICU)
  • High nurse-to-patient ratios (not acuity-based)
  • Multiple discharges and admissions (many nurses will discharge and admit an entire team of patients during their shift)
  • Lack of ancillary support and resources
  • Leaders who assume that nurses “can take one more patient”
  • Physicians who expect nurses to drop everything and attend to their needs
  • Interruptions while on their break
  • The expectation that nurses are all-giving.

A survey by travel nursing company RNnetwork, found that almost half of the Nurses they asked were considering leaving the profession. About a quarter said they felt overworked, 46 percent said their workloads had risen and 41 percent said they’d been harassed or bullied by managers or administrators. Making matters worse, with the aging of the baby boom generation, demand for health care is rising at the same time that large numbers of experienced Nurses are retiring.

Ashley Neuman, LPCC-S, one of Blazey’s colleagues in Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Enterprise, offered advice to caregivers during a 30-minute Wellness Connection presentation entitled “Managing Burnout in the Workplace: How Caregivers Cope.” She began with a definition of burnout, which can have three components:

  • Emotional Exhaustion – “Burnout can occur when you’re not just physically tired, but you are emotionally exhausted,” says Neuman. “It’s when you don’t have the motivation to get up, get moving and finish that one last clinical note. That emotional weight becomes heavier every day.”
  • Depersonalization – This happens when you have an unfeeling or impersonal response toward recipients of your service, care or instruction. “Nothing sparks passion or you don’t have that intrinsic motivation anymore,” she explains.
  • Dissatisfaction in Personal Achievements – Nurses who experience burnout may lack feelings of competence and achievement in their work. Neuman says, “You become a shell of yourself, losing interest in things you normally enjoy doing.” Maybe you dread going into a patient’s room or going home to make yet another dinner for your family.

Here are some tips that may help Nurses dealing with burnout.

1. Identify The best type of Nursing job for you

The field of Nursing is a large and diverse field. People in this profession might work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, nursing homes, office jobs, mobile units, private practices, home care, schools, the military, and even large public venues like amusement parks. And within the profession, there are medical specialties, such as pediatrics, cardiology, ophthalmology, geriatrics, and sports medicine. Spend some time figuring out what you like the most, and then focus your job search in this.

2. Search for workplaces with lower nurse-to-patient ratios

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) linked hospital Nurse staffing to nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction in their research on the topic of high Nurse turnover. "Nurses in hospitals with the highest patient-to-nurse ratios are more than twice as likely to experience job-related burnout and almost twice as likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs compared with Nurses in the hospitals with the lowest ratios," JAMA reported.  

The more patients Nurses are expected to care for in a given shift, the less time they have per patient. This can make the usually empathetic task of caring for patients feel more robotic, stressful and incomplete.

3. take care of your own body first

Most Nurses are inclined to take care of others first and worry about themselves later. But in order to be an effective nurse with a long career ahead of you, it’s critical that you take care of your own body. Be sure to make time in your life for adequate exercise, good nutrition, and restful sleep. Bring nutritious protein-packed foods during your breaks. And after a long day on your feet, don’t be afraid to just relax!

4.Learn to say “No.”

masmedicalstaffing.com says, For professionals in healthcare, it’s often our natural inclination to jump right in when someone asks for our help.

However, if you already have an overloaded schedule, your first concern should be to keep yourself healthy—otherwise, you won’t be able to take care of your patients properly.

So instead of always extending a helping hand, take a moment to consider whether you really have the time and energy to do so without adding a bunch of new Nurse stress-inducers to your day.

And if you can’t help out, say so firmly yet politely.

The next two tips are from www.travelnursesource.com

5. Eat Healthy and Stay Hydrated

It’s not a secret that the food that you consume plays a big role in your mood and productivity. Increase your fruits and vegetable intake as well as whole grains and lean meat within your diet for an energy-boosting food palette. To increase productivity, eat food that is rich in fiber and carbohydrates. Stick to food with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids to help reduce depression and lift your mood.

 6. Socialize

Having a support system is an integral part of a healthy mental and emotional state. Take some time from your busy schedule to socialize with your friends and family to take a break from your stressful environment. It’s scientifically proven that when we are more likely be happy when we are surrounded by the people who we love – that is why humans are a social creature.

What are some ways you prevent burnout in your life? Comment your thoughts below!

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Topics: burnout, nursing careeer, Nurse burnout

The Vital Role of Nurses in Addressing Climate Change

Posted by Contributor

Thu, Sep 28, 2017 @ 01:56 PM

homepage_6_orig-1.jpgThis article was written by the MODERN NURSE at www.discovernursing.com

Nurses are the largest group of healthcare providers and you have a lot of power. You can help make changes that affect your patients and the environment. With climate change on the rise, you can create awareness of areas within your place of employment that need improvement. The reduction of strong chemicals, plastics and paper items can have a strong impact. Check out this interview regarding the Nursing community and how you can affect environmental change.

Public awareness and interest in all things “green” has created a need for nurses to understand environmental issues and their relationship to health with credible, evidence-based information, as well as provide leadership in making the necessary changes in our policies and practices. Cara Cook, MS, RN, AHN-BC, is working to increase awareness and promote action that addresses climate change as a health imperative among the nursing community through her role as climate change program coordinator for the Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments (ANHE). We spoke with Cara, who was recently chosen as a 2017 Johnson & Johnson Global Citizen Young Health Leader, about the connection between environmentalism and nursing, and how her background as a nurse has prepared her for advocacy work.

Nursing Notes (NN): How long have you been a nurse, and what significant changes have you seen in the nursing profession since you began practicing?

Cara: I’ve been a nurse for a little more than eight years, and one major change I’ve noticed is the nursing contribution to environmentally safe practice environments. Nurses have long been advocates for safe nurse-patient ratios and preventing adverse health outcomes, such as falls or healthcare-associated infections. In addition to those important patient safety issues, nurses are realizing the connection between the environments in which we live, work, and play, and how this influences health outcomes.

Nurses are at the forefront of change within practicing settings through advocating for use of safer chemicals in hospital cleaning supplies, by forming green teams or sustainability departments that focus on reducing an institution’s environmental impact, or from working in communities to ensure patients have access to healthy foods and safe areas to exercise.

NN: Why is understanding climate change important for nurses?

Cara: Climate change is one of the biggest global health threats we face today. Nurses are on the frontlines of communities caring for patients impacted by climate change, so it’s important for nurses to understand the connection between climate change and health, and how the health sector can respond.

As the most trusted profession and largest group of healthcare providers, nurses are urgently needed to lead the fight against climate change. Being aware of and advocating for solutions to limit and respond to climate change is within our scope of nursing practice, with our own practice standards stating the “registered nurse practices in an environmentally safe and healthy manner.”

NN: How did you get involved with ANHE?

Cara: As part of my master’s program, I was required to complete a certain number of hours for two semesters with a public health organization. Since my area of interest is in environmental health, I was paired to work with Katie Huffling, the executive director at ANHE. At that time, my work with ANHE involved federal reform of toxic chemical policy and participation in campaigns at the state level focused on advancing health-protective regulations for hydraulic fracturing and antibiotic use in animal agriculture. About a year after I graduated, ANHE received funding to expand their climate change and health program, and I came on board as a full-time employee.

NN: How has your background as a nurse prepared you for your current position?

Cara: Nurses feel very comfortable advocating on behalf of patients in healthcare facilities, so all it took was learning how to translate that skill into the policy arena. Another core part of nursing that has prepared me for my current position is the focus on evidence-based practice. Environmental health or climate change work is similar in that you need to look at the evidence in order to understand the issues and potential solutions, and how to adequately communicate this to the public or legislators.

Also, I think being able to work through the unanticipated and creatively solve problems when everything seems to be going wrong, as so often is needed in bedside nursing, has helped with working through some of the challenges in environmental health work.

NN: What do your day-to-day responsibilities look like as a climate change program coordinator?

Cara: My role includes spearheading ANHE’s climate change and health program that aims to increase awareness among the nursing profession on the health impacts posed by climate change. Through this program, I work to engage individual nurses and nursing organizations in prioritizing climate change as a health imperative, emphasizing the urgency for nursing action in frontline communities and in an advocacy role. One of our current initiatives is working to form a Nursing Collaborative on Climate Change and Health, which is an effort to unite national nursing organizations around climate change, with the goals of bringing health to the forefront of discussion and policy-making and ensuring a coordinated nursing response across specialties.

Since our organization has a small staff, I also help with our other environmental health initiatives, currently focused on water and health, air pollution, energy and health, safer chemicals, and food sustainability. ANHE also provides advocacy trainings, which I help organize and run, for nurses to learn how to be successful advocates on environmental health issues.

NN: What is your favorite part of your job?

Cara: My favorite part of my job is working with and meeting such amazing nurses. Working for ANHE allows me to meet and work with a variety of nurses from different specialties and learn more about the work being done to address environmental health issues. I lead ANHE’s Global Nurses Climate Change Committee, which provides an opportunity to connect with nurses across the world and learn about what is being done in other countries around climate change.

Another perk of my job is being able to talk with nurses about climate and health, and help them learn how they can move action forward in their own practice. It’s rewarding to inspire nurses to take action and to see how passionate they become when they learn about how climate change is creating significant challenges for health.

NN: What is the most challenging part of your job?

Cara: With environmental health work, and even policy work in general, it can be challenging not to get discouraged. Working with such a strong group of nurses helps to keep the momentum going when efforts can be disheartening.

NN: Looking forward, what advancements/changes do you expect to see in nursing?

Cara: Our healthcare system is in a fragile state, and there must be some dramatic changes for the system to be sustainable. We are already seeing a shift to prevention and building up the primary care system, with increasing attention to how environmental factors can affect health, and I think nurses and nurse practitioners will have a major role in this shift as our profession branches off into different avenues of care outside of traditional settings.

NN: Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Cara: Many of these environmental health issues, including climate change, can seem so daunting, almost as if there is nothing that can be done to reverse the course of action. However, there are solutions to address these complex issues and we are at a critical point where, as nurses we can make a big impact on the health of our patients and communities. Nurses are so important to moving the health message forward on climate change and, collectively, we have incredible power to drive change.

To learn more about environmental health and how climate change impacts health, or to join ANHE, visit envirn.org. For more information on Health Policy Nursing, visit DiscoverNursing.com. To learn more about the Johnson & Johnson partnership with Global Citizen, visit jnj.com/progress

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Topics: environment, recycling, waste, Climate Change, plastic waste

This Photo Of A New Mom And Her Nurse Goes Viral

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Sep 25, 2017 @ 01:08 PM

21728093_10154618859726627_4483838069848273731_n.jpgAppreciation – we love to feel appreciated for what we do, but often, it feels like our work sometimes goes unnoticed. Here’s a story we think you’ll enjoy. It’s all about appreciation and the work Nurses do. This is a big Thank You to Labor & Delivery Nurses, Midwives and Doula’s.

Mother of four, Jill Krause, recently saw a photo by Katie Lacer that moved her. She was overcome with memories and gratitude for the Nurses. Jill shared the photo with her thoughts about the labor, delivery, and postpartum Nurses who help new mothers in their most vulnerable moments. The post quickly went viral and mothers everywhere commented their experiences and shared their thanks to all the Nurses out there.  Below is Jill's post, check it out and leave your thoughts in the comment sections!

"I'll never forget the faces of the nurses who followed me into the bathroom after delivering each baby. That moment when I was so vulnerable, so tired, scared, shaky. My swollen belly deflating, and my modesty long gone. They treated me with such kindness and dignity. For me, these have been moments of empowerment and confirmation that I have a real village to help me, even if just for that little bit of time in a bathroom, on a toilet, while a kind nurse shows me how to put an ice pad on my mesh undies. This photo by my friend MommaKT Shoots just takes me right back. Like, I can smell the Dermaplast. Let's hear it for the nurses and the doulas and anyone else who shows us how to make ice pad underwear (or helps with that first shower post c-section!) <3"

Posts came pouring in from moms all over! Below are some of the posts that were shared.

"When I was pushing, I'll never forget pulling my face away from my nurse's chest to see her scrub top SOAKED with my sweat and tears. I was like, 'Oh my god I'm so sorry!' And she said, 'Baby, this is life all over my shirt. Nowhere else I'd rather be. Now let's get that baby out.'" —Leigh Kathleen, Facebook

sub-buzz-4384-1505429714-1.pngPictured: Joanie McConnell, CNM at the University of Louisville by Katie Lacer / Via mommaktshoots.com

"I will never forget the nurse that helped me get to the bathroom for the first time after I had my daughter. I was hemorrhaging and when I stood it was so humiliating...but that kind soul didn't flinch. I kept apologizing and she kept reassuring me that it was nothing. I will never forget watching her clean my legs and I just kept thinking that this is what my God means when he says love your neighbor." —Tiffany Barnes

"My husband and I lost our daughter at 23 weeks two years ago, and delivered our rainbow baby boy at the same hospital this May. All the nurses I had knew our history, and when my son was born he wasn't breathing. He was immediately taken away to the NICU and I just could not stop sobbing. My nurses cried with me. They rubbed my hair and my back and did everything they possibly could to get me mobile and up to see my sweet boy in the NICU." —Lauren Self, Facebook

Thank you Nurses!
sub-buzz-9840-1505430155-4.png
Pictured: NICU nurse at Norton Women's & Children's Hospital discusses care measures for one of Amanda and Lauren Vinova's preemie triplets. By Katie Lacer / Via mommaktshoots.com

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Topics: new moms, labor nurses, delivery nurse, birth photo, viral nurse photo, thank nurses, midwives, doula

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