DiversityNursing Blog

Substance Use Disorder in Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Aug 09, 2018 @ 11:35 AM

39062394-pills-drugs-jpgSubstance Use Disorder can affect anyone regardless of age, ethnicity, gender, economic circumstance or occupation. Substance Use Disorder in Nursing is one of the most serious problems facing the profession today.

This disorder is more common in Nursing than many believe. The American Nurses Association (ANA) estimates that 6% to 8% of Nurses have a drug or alcohol problem that impairs their practice. 

Nurses are often handling powerful painkillers and other prescription drugs. This accessibility increases the temptation to use. In fact, a study showed that Nurses who handle drugs are more likely to have an addiction than Nurses who do not.

The behavior that results from this disease has far-reaching and negative effects, not only on the Nurses themselves, but also upon the patients who depend on them for safe, competent care. Early recognition, reporting and intervention are fundamental for keeping patients safe from harm and helping colleagues recover.

Any healthcare facility will tell you that when they have great Nurses, they want to hold onto them. Most state Nursing boards understand that addiction is a disease and Nurses should have the opportunity to pursue recovery without worrying about losing their job. 

Non-disciplinary programs are now used by a growing number of state Nursing boards. These programs provide rapid involvement in a rehabilitation or treatment program and remove him/her from providing care until safety to practice can be established and confirmed.

It is not easy for anyone with a substance abuse disorder to ask for help, and that can be especially true for Nurses. However, recognizing that there is a problem and asking for help are the two steps that can truly turn things around. If you or someone you know is struggling with SUD please use the resources below.

RESOURCES

For Nurses with SUD

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) offers an Alternative to Discipline Programs for Substance Use Disorder directory here for Nurses to locate alternative to discipline programs for SUD in their state if available.

For Nurses Concerned for a Colleague 
This NCSBN online brochure, What You Need to Know About Substance Use Disorder in Nursinginforms nurses of their ethical and professional responsibilities about reporting suspected or know SUD in colleagues.

For Employers
See Chapter 6 of NCSBN’s SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER IN NURSING: A Resource Manual and Guidelines for Alternative and Disciplinary Monitoring Programs offers a comprehensive examination of SUD in the healthcare workplace, particularly for Nurse managers.

For Nursing Students
Although not specifically for Nursing students, the NIH’s National Institute of Drug Abuse College-Age & Young Adults’ webpages, contain resources for how and where to get assistance for substance abuse, as well as drug facts, infographics, and more. Currently, there is very little updated guidance for Nursing students with substance use disorder. Nursing students may want to consult their health care provider, college health center, or employee assistance program.

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Topics: substance abuse, substance use disorder

Art In Hospitals Could Improve Patient Satisfaction

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Aug 03, 2018 @ 11:27 AM

97328f63008b3c20084941b6b3a0ec18According to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, patients' perceptions of the hospital they're being treated in may be improved by artwork. This could be a low-cost way to help improve patient satisfaction.

"It is relevant to hospital administrators who are under increasing pressure to improve care quality and the patient experience. People often find medical environments stark and uninviting, and artwork is a way to humanize hospital rooms and perhaps make them feel warmer, more inviting, and less 'medical," said Daniel George, associate professor of medical humanities.

Cleveland Clinic emailed former patients, inviting them to respond to a survey about the health system’s art program. Out of the more than 1,000 respondents that had visited Cleveland Clinic within the previous 12 months, 826 (76 percent) remembered noticing the art collection.

Of the 826 respondents who noticed the art, an average of:

  • 73 percent said it somewhat or significantly improved their mood. Results were even higher among the subset of respondents treated for breast cancer (78 percent), generalized anxiety (81 percent) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (84 percent). Results also were higher the longer the hospital stay. For example, 91 percent of two- and three-day visitors reported that the art improved their mood.
  • 61 percent said it somewhat or significantly reduced their stress. Results were even higher among the subset of respondents treated for cancer (65 percent), generalized anxiety (69 percent) and PTSD (81 percent) — as well as among the subset of two- and three-day visitors (72 percent).
  • 39 percent said it somewhat or significantly improved their comfort or pain level. Results were even higher among the subset of respondents treated for cancer (43 percent), osteoarthritis (47 percent), generalized anxiety (49 percent) and PTSD (54 percent).

fullsizeoutput_1da7According to research done by Stine Maria Louring Nielsen and professor Michael Finbarr Mullins of Aalborg University in Denmark, patients noted that the mere presence of the artworks inspired confidence that the hospital was well cared-for, leading them to expect a high level of care while staying there.

Arts in Medicine is a national and international program that brings healing arts into healthcare systems. One of the oldest programs is at Duke University, said visiting artist Elizabeth Garlington, which made bringing the program to Haywood, a Duke LifePoint hospital, a logical extension.

Ken Picou, a physical therapist assistant at the hospital, said the artwork is already serving its purpose. “My patients walked farther today because they wanted to see the pictures,” he said. “One patient walked twice as far to see more.”

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“A Nurse can document how far a patient walked if they say which picture they reached because they know it is 32 feet from pod to pod,” Garlington said. “For patients with dementia, their long-term memories can be triggered by seeing the photo of Looking Glass Falls where they may have once gone hiking or quilts that prompt someone to remember a quilt they once made.”

Garlington noted the images were beneficial to Nurses as well. "In handling patients this sick, there is compassion fatigue for the Nurses who are dealing with trauma every day," she said. "That's why we choose healing images, water, nature and scenes in Western North Carolina to bring a calmness."

Susan Mahoney, the Chief Nursing Officer at Haywood Regional Medical Center, said "This has been a minimal investment with a big impact."

Artwork in hospitals can be extremely beneficial in many ways. We hope to see more art programs and hospitals teaming up in the future to provide a more therapeutic environment for patients.

What is your work environment like? Is there uplifting artwork where you work? If so, please share! 

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Topics: patient satisfaction, art in hospitals

13 Pregnant Nurses In Two North Carolina Hospitals

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jul 26, 2018 @ 11:06 AM

Screen Shot 2018-07-26 at 9.38.27 AM-276377-editedParty of 7

Susie Nix, Michelle Moore, Amanda Loye, Natalie Deal, Ashley Davis, Abby Lucas and Katie Jones all work together in Labor and Delivery at Cone Health Women’s Hospital in Greensboro, North Carolina and all seven of them are expecting at the same time! 

The due dates are between August and December this year.

Loye is expecting twin boys, Moore, Deal, Davis and Lucas are expecting boys, while Nix and Jones say they don't want to know the gender until the baby is born.

All of the women will be giving birth at Greensboro hospital, of course. 

Multiple maternity leaves aren’t an issue since they have a full team of 85 Nurses in the unit.

Loey said that being pregnant and working with expecting mothers makes it easy to start a conversation with the patients. “It gives you something to talk about right off the bat!” she said.

Screen Shot 2018-07-26 at 9.47.33 AM-332874-edited"The 6-pack"

Over at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. we meet Nina Day, Bethany Stringer, Emily Johnson, Nikki Huth, Sabrina Hudson and Katie Carlton.

According to one report, their patients refer to them as the fabulous "six-pack." 

“Of course, people say, ‘Is there something in the water?’” Carlton said. “It really intrigues people and gives them something to focus on when they are there.”

They are a tight-knit group of Nurses who love that they’re sharing this experience. 

“People being pregnant together may not be a rarity,” Hudson said. “We are just really excited about our babies and being able to share play dates. I don’t think that after the pregnancies are over we will stop sharing milestones together.”

Their due dates range from July to December. Hospital spokeswoman Eryn Johnson reassured those concerned, that the hospital has made plans to continue patient care when the women take maternity leave.

"All of these Nurses have spoken highly about sharing their pregnancy journeys together along with the support, advice and tips they’ve been able to share,"  Johnson said. "Quite the bond that’s been established."

Topics: pregnant nurse

Quality Over Quantity: Why Niche Job Boards Work In Your Favor

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jul 20, 2018 @ 10:18 AM

niche ob boardsLarge job boards like Indeed and Glassdoor compete to display millions of jobs. Niche job boards like our DiversityNursing.com job board, help you reach a more precise audience.

Niche job boards are generally smaller job boards that are location or industry focused. Many niche job boards are sponsored and/or maintained by industry leading professional associations. From a recruiter’s perspective, the industry focus of niche job boards helps to target job advertisements toward qualified candidates

Healthcare organizations need to look at the importance of the recruiting function, and how, if recruiters are able to bring more high-quality talent into the organization, that level of quality will cascade through everything else employees do, ultimately impacting the delivery of patient care.

Recruiters like posting jobs on niche boards because they know that everyone applying is in the right place. Applicants won’t find search results for jobs outside their profession so recruiters won't receive resumes that don’t pertain to the job description they posted. This naturally leads to smaller candidate pools, allowing the recruiter more time to consider each application. 

These smaller job boards are familiar with particular specialties, job titles, certifications and keywords your desired audience uses and requires. They understand and stay up-to-date on the hiring trends for their niche profession. For example, if a large organization is laying off workers, a niche job board can help you target a specific market.

Niche boards also offer outstanding branding opportunities such as job alerts, banner advertisements, company culture pages like DiversityNursing.com's Employer Profiles, to help promote your job posts. 

Another important asset a niche board has is professional staff who know your name and answer your calls and questions. They believe that people matter, your time is precious, and good communication is key. This means no waiting on a chat bot or voice recording. 

Although niche job boards do not boast the traffic of larger sites like Career Builder and Monster, it would be naïve to rule them out of recruitment advertising budgets. Niche job boards attract specific candidates that possess specialized skills and more relevant, up-to-date experience. They also receive higher quality and more relevant applications. Therefore, niche job boards are the fastest way to find strong candidates, leading to lower cost-to-fill.

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Topics: hiring nurses, nursing jobs, niche job board, nurse recruitment

Frontier Nursing University Awarded $1,376,800 HRSA Program Grant

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Tue, Jul 17, 2018 @ 03:09 PM

Frontier-NursingFrontier Nursing University (FNU) has been awarded the Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The grant totals $1,376,800 in funding from 2018-2020, including $600,000 in student scholarships.

The goal of the ANEW program is to support innovative academic-practice partnerships to prepare primary care advanced practice registered nursing students to practice in rural and underserved settings through academic and clinical training. The partnerships support traineeships as well as infrastructure funds to schools of nursing and their practice partners who deliver longitudinal primary care clinical training experiences with rural and/or underserved populations.   

As a university offering graduate nursing education and community-based clinical training using distance-learning strategies to reach students across the nation, FNU has the ability to have a widespread impact on primary care clinical education, and ultimately, on the quality and access to care in rural areas. Via the ANEW grant, FNU plans to support 350 nurse practitioner and nurse-midwifery students completing clinical training in rural areas with traineeship funds. This grant will also provide funds for the development of ANEW program infrastructure, implementation, and evaluation.

Through this very important program, FNU will identify and co-create improved curriculum and clinical training experiences in collaboration with academic-practice partners (APPs) who are directly affected by the healthcare disparities facing the rural communities where they practice. This joint venture with our academic-practice partners will make it possible for FNU to test, implement, evaluate, and improve training for primary care preceptors and Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) students.  

“We are honored to receive the ANEW grant and excited for the opportunities it creates,” said FNU president Dr. Susan E. Stone. “Since its founding, Frontier Nursing University has been committed to filling the gaps in quality healthcare available in rural and underserved populations. This grant will enable us to expand our impact and improve our ability to address healthcare disparities in communities across the country.”

The overarching goal of the FNU ANEW program is to expand formal academic-practice partnerships in order to co-design and implement strategies to enhance the preparation and distribution of APRNs and nurse-midwives practicing in rural settings. The steps to achieving this goal include four primary objectives:

Objective 1:  Improve student readiness to practice in rural primary care settings through co-designed and tailored didactic education and clinical training experiences through academic-practice partnerships.

Objective 2:  Recruit, train, support, and evaluate clinical preceptors located in rural areas nationwide as program partners in order to leverage the quality and distribution of primary care preceptors in rural settings.

Objective 3:  Provide 175 FNU students entering the clinical practicum in a rural setting with $2,000 in traineeship support each grant year.

Objective 4:  Improve the distribution of APRNs and nurse-midwives throughout rural communities across the nation via improved strategies to support and connect trainees with rural clinical experience to primary care employment in those same settings.  

Learn more about Frontier Nursing University  

 

Topics: Frontier Nursing University, grants

The Nursing Shortage In The U.S

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Jul 10, 2018 @ 02:42 PM

NURSE57The United States has a massive Nursing shortage, and the problem is only going to grow. Due to an influx of patients into our health system, the retirement of baby boomers, and educational obstacles, Nursing positions aren’t being filled fast enough to keep up with demand.

By 2022, the American Nursing Association predicts the U.S. may need more than 1 million new Nurses to both care for a growing number of older Americans and replace retiring Nurses.

“I’ve been a Nurse for 40 years, and the shortage is the worst I’ve ever seen it,” said Ron Moore, who retired in October from his position as Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer for Charleston Area Medical Center.

More people have access to health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act passage in 2010. This has led to an increase in people seeking medical care. Another reason for the increase in patients is medical technology has advanced to the point that it has enabled people to live longer. The number of people over the age of 65 in this country is rapidly increasing. There are more Americans over the age of 65 now than at any other time in the country’s history. It’s predicted that this number will continue to grow, which means more people with health issues and more people in Nursing homes.

Students appear to have a high level of interest in a Nursing career. It pays well, has strong projected job security, and allows practitioners to do meaningful work. However, when applicants send in their transcripts, many are turned away or wait-listed. 

The problem in Nursing education is there aren’t enough teachers to educate student Nurses. Not only that, but the current faculty’s median age is in the 50s, so many of them will be looking to retire soon.

For those that do get accepted into Nursing programs, there’s the cost of schooling to worry about. Whether trying to attain a Nursing license through an associate, bachelor’s, or master’s program, the costs add up. Also those pursuing a specialty have to be prepared to devote years to their professional development. 

Grants and scholarships like the DiversityNursing.com $5,000 Education Award, can help with some of this burden, but unfortunately, there just aren’t enough to go around.

Seun Ross, Director of Nursing practice and work environment for the American Nurses Association, thinks focus should be placed on boosting resources available to Nursing schools so they can hire more teachers who, in turn, can train more students. She also said hospitals must invest in the experience of Nursing, buying cutting-edge equipment and cultivating an inclusive work culture in order to get the most out of their Nurses.

In terms of work environment, the American Nurses Association suggests introducing more flexibility into the work environment structure and scheduling programs; rewarding experienced Nurses for serving as mentors to new Nurses; and implementing appropriate salary and benefit programs.

Nurses comprise the backbone of the entire health care industry. Without them, the whole thing collapses. At every level, the quality of care and human touch necessary for positive outcomes link directly to the Nursing staff.

Topics: nursing shortage

Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Jul 03, 2018 @ 10:18 AM

mental healthMental health conditions do not discriminate based on race, color, gender or identity. Anyone can experience the challenges of mental illness regardless of their background. However, background and identity can make access to mental health treatment much more difficult.

July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month and the month offers organizations an opportunity to create mental health awareness in diverse communities. 

In May of 2008, the US House of Representatives announced July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

The resolution was sponsored by Rep. Albert Wynn and cosponsored by a large bipartisan group to improve access to mental health treatment and services and promote public awareness of mental illness.

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Bebe Moore Campbell was an author, advocate, co-founder of NAMI Urban Los Angeles and national spokesperson, who lost her battle with cancer in November 2006.

One in 5 Americans is affected by mental health conditions. Stigma is toxic to their mental health because it creates an environment of shame, fear and silence that prevents many people from seeking help and treatment. The perception of mental illness won’t change unless we act to change it.

Ways to get involved

America’s entire mental health system needs improvement, including when it comes to serving marginalized communities. With all of our help, we hope this month brings awareness to this issue. 

Topics: mental health, minority mental health, Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, mental health awareness, Bebe Moore Campbell

The Importance of Communication

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jul 02, 2018 @ 10:46 AM

communicateCommunication in Nursing is essential to patient safety, health and well-being. As Nurses assume more complex roles and care for older and more culturally diverse populations, strong communication skills are critical.

“According to one study, effective communication reduces stress, promotes wellness and therefore improves the overall quality of life of patients. Below are some tips to help improve communication.”

BATHE (Background, Affect, Trouble, Handling, and Empathy)

Nurses and other healthcare experts have been looking for the key to a quality patient encounter that also fits within busy workflows. At the University of Virginia, researcher Claudia Allen, JD, PhD, developed the Background, Affect, Trouble, Handling, and Empathy (BATHE) method, designed to only take five minutes.

BATHE uses open-ended conversations between patients and nurses to build strong relationships that can often go beyond clinical needs. Understanding who the patient is as a person helps the nurse connect with the patient and make her feel more comfortable during a potentially tumultuous care encounter. To learn more about BATHE click here

Breaking Barriers for Effective Communication

Some health care organizations may still foster a culture that discourages employees from reporting negative events.  From an ethical viewpoint, patient safety takes precedence over loyalty to peers and superiors, especially when those individuals are not conforming to safety procedures.

As a step in promoting a culture of open communication, nurse professionals must display fortitude in reporting unsafe conditions and adverse events. In the modern caregiving environment, it is no longer acceptable to blindly follow instructions. Silence can lead to negative treatment outcomes, or worse – to a mortal event.

Active Listening

Active listening is an essential holistic healthcare tool. It is a non-intrusive way of sharing a patient’s thoughts and feelings. To practice active listening, follow these steps:

  • Listen to what the patient is saying.
  • Repeat what you heard to the patient.
  • Check with the patient to ensure your reflection is correct.

The goal of active listening is to reflect the feeling or intent behind their words. You should listen to understand, not to respond. Practice active listening as one of several ways to build rapport.

If there seems to be a disconnect, reflect what has been said by paraphrasing. "What I'm hearing is…," or "Sounds like you are saying…," are great ways to reflect back. Don’t simply repeat what the speaker has said verbatim, though—you’ll sound insincere or unintelligent. Instead, express what the speaker’s words mean to you. Ask questions to clarify certain points: "What do you mean when you say..." or "Is this what you mean?"

Humor

Humor in health care is often described as a complimentary treatment. It has been seen to enhance care relationships, coping and healing while reducing anxiety, lowering blood pressure and releasing endorphins.

Humor can also be a great way for you to cope and perform in unpleasant and challenging situations. For many, humor can help put an experience or expectation into perspective and make it easier to move forward and or manage.

Remember to not use negative humor, and to be respectful of other cultures and how humor may be perceived. 

Body Language

One of the most important factors in communicating with others is our nonverbal communication. We are aware and in control of the words that we speak, but often the nonverbal cues we send may go unnoticed. According to an article by Amy Lucas on Livestrong.com, “We can reinforce, contradict, substitute, complement, or emphasize our verbal communication with non-verbal cues such as gestures, expressions and vocal inflection.” Nonverbal cues are so strong because they communicate to others on a subconscious level, causing individuals to regard nonverbal communication as “true” communication because it provides real cues and emotions. When verbal language and body language are congruent, this works to enhance the overall quality of the message and allow it to resonate with the individual receiving the message.

Do you have any tips you would like to share? Please comment below. We would love to hear what you have to say!

Topics: communicating, communication in nursing

Nurse Suicide Is A Real Problem We Should Be Addressing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jun 21, 2018 @ 10:29 AM

toolkit2In recent news, the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have brought the issue of suicide into the spotlight. Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and one of three that is increasing. The other two are Alzheimer’s disease and drug overdose, in part because of the spike in opioid deaths, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the C.D.C.

Suicide rates from 1999 to 2016 increased in all age groups younger than 75 years, with the greatest increase shown in “middle-aged adults” aged 45 to 64 years, increasing 25 percent nationally. 

Research has shown that Physicians are twice as likely to commit suicide as the general population, and while there is a notable lack of information about the suicide rates for Nurses in the US, a report from the UK finds that “for females, the risk of suicide among health professionals was 24% higher than the female national average; this is largely explained by high suicide risk among female Nurses.”

Nurses are stuck between demands of the patient and demands of the system. When caring for patients, you are exposed to everything from debilitating diseases to traumatic situations. Without proper coping mechanisms – a support system to vent to after work, colleagues to share similar feelings with, a stable and supportive home life – the tragedies of daily work can take a toll on Nurses, one that is insidious and may not become evident until a breaking point is reached. 

Health-care organizations need to more proactively report suicide in their workforce, so we can begin to understand the drivers for suicide in health-care workers. Also institutions need to develop procedures and processes for grief recovery support for colleagues of the deceased. Many institutions shy away from even mentioning suicide at the workplace. There is concern for suicide contagion, an increased tendency toward suicide in the already predisposed upon hearing of a suicide.

Having a stronger ability to identify the warning signs of suicide can help healthcare professionals spot them in their peers—and themselves, said Joe Parks, M.D., medical director of the National Council for Behavioral Health. "We don't train Doctors and Nurses near well enough to ask for help for themselves," he said.

There are several warning signs providers can keep an eye out for, such as:

  • Isolation
  • Increased anxiety
  • A sense of being trapped or a burden on others
  • Increased use of drugs or alcohol
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Referencing or mentioning a desire to die


Resources

  • If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call 911 immediately.
  • If you are in crisis or are experiencing difficult or suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255)
  • If you’re uncomfortable talking on the phone, you can also text NAMI to 741-741 to be connected to a free, trained crisis counselor on the Crisis Text Line.
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Topics: Nurse suicide, Suicide in Nursing, Nurse depression

Unconscious Bias in Healthcare

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Jun 15, 2018 @ 09:37 AM

Unconscious bias in HealthcareThe Nursing profession has long emphasized its commitment to social justice and health equity. Nurses are known for advocating policies and regulations that are inclusive and lead to positive patient outcomes. However, an essential component of promoting health equity is acknowledging individual unconscious biases and understanding how they may impact the care that's provided.

According to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, implicit bias, also known as unconscious bias, is “the bias in judgment and/or behavior that results from subtle cognitive processes (e.g., implicit attitudes and implicit stereotypes) that often operate at a level below conscious awareness and without intentional control.” 

Social Psychologists theorize that the content of our unconscious biases are learned from the society in which we live. From a very early age, all of us are repetitively exposed to certain ideas from our family, friends, neighbors, teachers; and, from the constant input of various forms of media. Over time, these ideas become embedded in our belief system and are activated automatically and unconsciously.

In the context of health care, unconscious bias can lead to health disparities such as the under treatment of conditions like pain, cardiovascular disease, asthma and mental health in racial and ethnic minorities. One of the things that accounts for health disparities is unconscious bias in health care providers. Not only does unconscious bias contribute to under-treatment, but studies have shown that providers with more implicit biases are more likely to have negative interactions with patients. This impacts trust and the likelihood that patients will seek health care. 

There are ways we can prevent this.

Notice Your Assumptions

Everything from language barriers to job status to regional inflections can cause people to assume a patient has certain traits, behaviors, or beliefs that you might not agree with. Notice that feeling when you are trying to explain treatments to a patient, when responding to their needs, or when dealing with an extended and involved family.

Follow the National CLAS Standards

The National CLAS Standards are a set of 15 action steps intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities by providing a blueprint for individuals and health care organizations to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate services.

Explore awkwardness and discomfort

It’s okay to feel outside your comfort zone or to be unsure of what to feel, do or say. In a world in which people mostly back away from discomfort and awkwardness, that could be the source of the greatest learning.

Training

Rather than making changes from the top of the business and hoping it trickles down into every area, unconscious bias training provides each individual employee with an understanding of the impact they can have by changing their way of thinking.

Unconscious bias training is geared around three things: awareness, impact and action. We can build awareness about why biases exist (and individual ones we hold), demonstrate the impact they can have on our decisions, actions and working patterns, and finally, agree how we can take action to ensure they are not expressed in a way that could negatively impact the work environment.

Although many healthcare providers don't see themselves as being biased, it's a common and persistent problem. If left unrecognized and unmanaged, unconscious bias can lead to health disparities, resulting in potentially negative consequences for patients. The strategies above can be used by Nurses and other healthcare professionals to overcome unconscious bias and provide optimal patient care.

Topics: unconscious bias, unconscious bias training, unconscious bias in healthcare

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