DiversityNursing Blog

These Companies Are Celebrating Nurses Week With Special Offers

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, May 05, 2022 @ 09:02 AM

GettyImages-1278991873Each year during Nurses Week we take the time to show our appreciation for Nurses and all of the amazing hard work they do. Companies have also taken this opportunity to show their appreciation by offering special discounts and freebies for healthcare heroes. 

To save Nurses some time, we compiled a list of companies who are participating in special offers. 

Applebee’s is offering Nurses with a verifiable ID a free appetizer with any entree purchase through May 15. However, each Applebee’s franchise may offer something different or extra. Call toll-free at 888-592-7753 to see.

Chipotle is giving 2,000 health care professionals free burritos for a year. Until May 6th, people can nominate healthcare heroes by tagging them on Chipotle’s official social channels, and give a brief description of the amazing work they do.

Texas de Brazil is offering a 15% discount with a valid badge or ID.

ASICS is providing Nurses with 40% off ASICS products. When you verify your healthcare worker status using SheerID, you will receive a one-time-use promo code.

Great American Cookies is giving a free Original Chocolate Chip Cookie through Friday, May 6, with any purchase and valid ID.

Amazon is offering four free medical drama books, specially curated to celebrate Nurses.

Outback Steakhouse is offering 10% off your bill when you show your industry identification. The discount is not available via online ordering.

Adidas has offers of 30% off in-store and on the Adidas website, and 20% off at factory outlet stores, when you verify your status as a Nurse with ID.me.

Ring is offering 20% savings on select Ring Doorbell products.

Brooklyn Bedding wants you to get the best sleep possible with 25% off and free shipping on your entire order of mattresses, pillows, sheets and/or foundations. Verify your eligibility via ID.me during checkout.

Lululemon is giving 15% off in-store or online purchases.

Budget is offering a discount of up to 25% for Nurses. Create an ID.me account, or sign in to enjoy this offer.

Enterprise Rent-a-Car is also offering 25% off their rental car costs. An ID.me account is required to access this discount.

National another car rental company, “lets you choose any car in the aisle and go” with up to 25% off.

Thank you Nurses for all you do! We hope you enjoy your special week! 

Topics: National Nurses Week, Nurses Week

Top Items Nurses Always Have on Hand

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, May 03, 2022 @ 11:11 AM

GettyImages-1277113215As a Nurse, you always have essentials in your pockets or bag to help you get through a shift and day-to-day life as you never know when your experience and skills will be needed. Here are some of the essential items Nurses have on hand.

IIPHONE & CHARGER

Your iphone is a useful tool especially when you fill it with apps such as Eponyms, Nursing Dictionaries and Drug Handbooks. You can also use it to set alarms for important reminders.

LOTION & SANITIZER

Nurses are constantly washing their hands throughout the day, leaving their skin dry. That's why having lotion in their bags is important to keep skin in good condition. Meanwhile, the sanitizer helps them steer clear of those pesky germs.

STETHOSCOPE & CLEANER

Every Nurse needs their stethoscope! It's important to keep your stethoscope sanitized, so it's a good idea to keep stethoscope cleaner in your bag. It's an even better idea to have a cleaner with a rubber protecting agent to prevent cracking, keeping it in tip top shape.

EXTRA MASKS

You can never have enough masks and gloves!

FACE CREAM, CHAPSTICK AND MINTS

Wearing face PPE can cause skin irritation, acne and cracked lips. You can use face creams and lip balms to keep skin healthy. Wearing masks all day can sometimes cause bad breath, try keeping mints or a travel size mouth wash in your bag.

SCISSORS & TAPE

Nurses need to have these in their pockets for emergency use, especially for wound care. Micropore tape is also important and should be readily available, for example, when your patient accidentally pulls his/her IV.

SALINE FLUSHES

Nurses are frequently administering medications via IV so having saline flushes on hand is a smart move. 

SMALL NOTEBOOK

Mini notebooks are great for taking notes from Doctors and writing down important observations of your patients to remember for charting.

WATER BOTTLE & SNACKS

Staying hydrated is super important as well as eating healthy during your shift. Have a reusable bottle to keep your favorite beverage nearby and toss easy to eat and healthy snacks in your bag.

RETRACTABLE PEN HOLDER

No more losing your pens and markers. The retractable holder keeps badges, IDs, pens, markers and more attached to you for easy access and safe keeping.

What are some of your favorite items you keep nearby?

Topics: nurse life, nurse essentials, nursing shift

Record Number of NPs Licensed in the US

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Apr 19, 2022 @ 11:06 AM

GettyImages-1325309684The American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) reported more than 355,000 Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are licensed to practice in the U.S. This is up 9% from the estimated 325,000 reported in May 2021.

This increase in NPs will help aid the healthcare provider shortages and ease burnout from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Nurse Practitioners are answering the call to provide vital health care services to all Americans,” said AANP President, April N. Kapu, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC, FAANP, FCCM, FAAN. “With the challenges of the pandemic and the demand for more accessible and equitable care, NPs continue to enhance health care delivery across all settings. Today’s Nurse Practitioner count indicates that demand for these highly-qualified clinicians continues to be on the rise — and for good reason.”

Nurse Practitioner holds the first spot on U.S. News and World Report's 2022 Best Health Care Jobs list and second on the 2022 100 Best Jobs list. 

Kapu said, “These rankings highlight what we have known for some time: the NP role is not just a job, it’s a calling for more than 325,000 NPs who are working tirelessly on the front lines of health care, from hospitals to primary care clinics, in patients’ homes and via telehealth. NPs are highly trained and committed health care providers improving the health of their patients and communities. As we enter the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, America’s NPs will continue delivering high-quality care in every health care setting and expanding access to care in vulnerable and underserved communities. Their dedication makes me proud to be an NP.”

As of May 2021, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) lists these 5 states as having the highest employment levels for Nurse Practitioners:

  • California
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Florida
  • Tennessee 

Nurse Practitioners in the U.S. make an average of $118,040 annually, according to the BLS

Currently, more than 25 states allow NPs to practice independently. This means they can open their own clinics and treat their own patients without needing a Physician to oversee the practice.

A career as an NP is very rewarding and allows more freedom and flexibility than many other types of Nursing positions. 

Topics: nurse practitioners, nurse practitioner, NPs

A Career In Correctional Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Apr 06, 2022 @ 12:01 PM

GettyImages-1338845492There is a dire need for healthcare professionals to care for America's incarcerated patient population. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world, according to the World Prison Brief. With approximately 2.1 million people behind bars. 

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people who work as Registered Nurses, including Correctional Nurses, could rise by 9% from 2020 to 2030.

Correctional health care requires a compassion that sees beyond a person's criminal record and can provide quality care in a unique setting.

According to Indeed, some of the skills a Correctional Nurse should have are similar to a Nurse in any professional environment, with 1 additional skill:

  • Critical thinking skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Communication skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Emergency response
  • Knowledge of how to interact with inmates

As a Correctional Nurse, you provide a wide variety of care including intake and testing, treating preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes, chronic illnesses ranging from influenza to AIDS, and emergency injuries such as broken bones and puncture wounds. 

Some patients may need to be taken through detox due to substance abuse and others may have symptoms of mental illness. With such a range of health issues, it's important to have a broad set of skills and be able to act quickly. 

Dodge Correctional Institution's Nursing Supervisor, Paula Stelsel said, "Working here, I’ve touched on everything from dialysis to post-op to hospice care. You’re getting a little bit of everything, and if you enjoy patient education, what a great place to come and work." 

Many people have the notion that working in a correctional facility would be unsafe, however these facilities follow strict security protocols to ensure safety. In any hospital or healthcare setting, Nurses face safety risks. 

“There’s a perception out there that prisons are like people seen on TV, dirty and dangerous. But that’s not the case. They’re really not that far from a regular clinic that everyone and anyone goes to. The clientele is just a bit different. A lot of inmates haven’t had care, so you can enact meaningful change just by providing your compassionate care as a Nurse. Their health literacy is pretty low, and a lot of them are very appreciative of the help that you give them, the compassion that you show them, the empathy. They’ve just never experienced those things." said, Registered Nurse Robert Frank.  

According to PayScale, the average annual base salary for Correctional Nurses is $54,000 and total pay ranges from $38,000 to $78,000. Correctional Nurse salaries are determined by many factors such as experience, credentials, and location.

Overall, Correctional Nursing is an interesting healthcare option that provides a different, rewarding experience each day. 

Check out the video below to see a day in the life of a Correctional Nurse.

 

 

Topics: correctional nursing, corrections nurse, correctional health care

What is Harm Reduction?

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Mar 24, 2022 @ 10:44 AM

GettyImages-1312334127In the United States, drug overdose deaths have reached historical rates. From September 2020 to September 2021, more than 104,000 Americans died due to a drug overdose. 

Harm reduction services play a key role in preventing death, injury, disease, overdose, and substance misuse or disorder.

According to DrugPolicy.org, harm reduction is based on acknowledging the dignity and humanity of people who use substances and bringing them into a community of care in order to minimize negative consequences and promote optimal health.

Nurses can assist with different types of harm reduction programs. Some of these programs are:

Needle Exchange Programs

People who inject drugs face a greater risk of contracting HIV and hepatitis C. Research shows that 1 in 23 women and 1 in 36 men who use drugs intravenously will contract HIV at some point during their lifetimes, according to American Addiction Centers.

Sterile syringe access programs, also known as needle exchange programs, help lower these risks by limiting syringe sharing and providing safe disposal options.

These programs also provide disease testing, referrals to drug treatment, detoxification, social services, and primary health care.

According to the CDC, nearly 30 years of research has shown that comprehensive Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) are safe, effective, cost-saving, and do not increase illegal drug use or crime. Research also shows that new users of SSPs are 5x more likely to enter drug treatment and about 3x more likely to stop using drugs than those who don’t use the programs.

Supervised Injection Facilities

Also known as overdose prevention centers, these facilities offer a safe space for people to consume pre-obtained drugs under the supervision of medically trained professionals.

Facility staff members do not assist in consumption or handle any drugs brought in by clients.

Healthcare providers are there to offer sterile injection supplies, test for the presence of fentanyl in drugs, answer questions on safe injection practices, administer first aid if needed, and monitor for overdose.

Years ago, the American Medical Association vouched for these facilities stating, studies from other countries have shown that supervised injection facilities reduce the number of overdose deaths, reduce transmission rates of infectious disease, and increase the number of individuals initiating treatment for substance use disorders without increasing drug trafficking or crime in the areas where the facilities are located.

In 2021, New York City became the first in the nation to open an overdose prevention center.

Some community-based harm reduction examples are:

Naloxone Distribution Programs

Naloxone (also called Narcan®) is an inexpensive, FDA-approved generic drug that works to reverse an opioid overdose, including fentanyl overdose, by restoring breath to unconscious overdose victims. It is simple to administer, making it safe and easy for laypeople to use.

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Good Samaritan Laws

The chance of surviving an overdose can depend heavily on how fast medical services are provided. Often, witnesses of an overdose are hesitant to call 911 due to fear of police involvement.

In an effort to prevent this from happening, the majority of US states have passed Good Samaritan laws. Many of these laws provide protection from prosecution for low-level drug offenses, like the sale or use of a controlled substance or paraphernalia, for the person seeking medical assistance as well as the person who overdosed. 

With rising cases of overdoses and drug-related diseases, the US continues to search for new and innovative approaches to drug use, drug treatment, and drug policy based on science and research.

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Topics: harm reduction, harm reduction techniques, harm reduction programs

Advice For Nurses Managing Difficult Patient Visitors

Posted by Diversity Nursing

Thu, Mar 10, 2022 @ 02:31 PM

GettyImages-1151675542

Nurses are the front-line of patient care and often spend time around their patient's family and loved ones. It's important for family and friends to be there, but in a highly emotional environment, sometimes those visitors can become a challenge. When a patient’s relative is intimidating, aggressive, or overbearing, it can be extremely difficult for Nurses to perform their jobs and feel safe. 

Here's some advice for keeping your cool with difficult visitors.

First Impressions

To start off on the right foot, get to know the visitors in the room by introducing yourself and building rapport. Be proactive and explain what everyone should expect, who else may be assisting in the process, and how often someone will be by to check in. Naturally, family members will worry and feel helpless. It's important to address any questions or concerns they have.

Listen and Acknowledge

When you start to recognize a visitor's behavior shifting in a negative direction, try to get to the root of the problem so you can diffuse the situation. Let them express their feelings and acknowledge their concerns. Try to understand the situation from their perspective.

Remain Calm

If tensions start to rise and the visitor becomes angry or aggressive, it is best to remain calm and keep a physical distance. Try to maintain a composed voice, speak slowly, and use a low volume tone.

It is easy to get defensive, but it is best not to escalate the problem with more negative energy.

Don’t interrupt them. Wait for them to take a break from venting, acknowledge that you’ve heard them and jump in. This gives you the opportunity to take back control of the conversation and guide them to a solution. Master De-escalation Instructor, Myra Golden, calls this ‘the jump rope technique’.

Draw The Line

If inappropriate behavior occurs, it is important to stand up for yourself and set boundaries. If you feel the environment is becoming unsafe, remove yourself and call security.

Not sure what to say? Resilient Nursing has some good examples:

  • “I am here to help. I will answer your questions and address your concerns, but I can’t do that if you are yelling at me.”
  • “We are in a hospital. I need you to stop. You are disrupting patients and visitors right now.”
  • “What you just did/said was not acceptable. If you continue, I will have to ask you to leave.”

Document

If any issues occur on the floor, you should let the Charge Nurse know about it. Also document the event, summarizing what took place and how you handled it. Not only is this good to have for legal reasons, it also makes other healthcare providers aware for the future.

Self-Care

Being involved in a conflict or altercation can take a toll on your stress levels. Be mindful of how you feel and take time to process your feelings. Do what you need to do to feel better. Try talking to a friend or coworker or try journaling.

But most importantly, don't take it personally. You are doing the best you can and are not responsible for someone else's bad reaction to stress. 

Topics: hospital visitors, hospital visits, difficult patient family members, difficult patient visitors

NBNA Program Encourages Young Students Of Color To Consider A Career In Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Mar 02, 2022 @ 02:07 PM

NBNAA key tool to reducing health disparities in patient care involves diversifying the Nursing field. The Nursing population should be as diverse as the patient population they serve.

According to research, the majority of Nurses in the US are White/Caucasian at 73.3% and only 7.8% are African American. 

Jennifer Coleman, a Samford University Professor and Pediatric Nurse, is one of several National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) members working toward increasing diversity in Nursing. To help accomplish this goal, the association created a program called NBNA Mini Nurse Academies, which encourages elementary school students of color to consider a career in Nursing. 

"The purpose of this innovative program is to increase student awareness of Nursing as a career option and to provide students with knowledge and skills related to professional Nursing practice," said UAB School of Nursing Associate Professor Loretta Lee, PhD, CRNP, FNP-BC, CNE. "In these academies, students in third through sixth grades from school districts where there are large communities of color will be introduced to the Nursing profession by professional Nurses who share similar backgrounds and lived experiences."

The NBNA represents approximately 200,000 African American Nurses from the USA, Canada, Eastern Caribbean, and Africa, with 115 chartered chapters nationwide. They recognize the need to increase diversity within the Nursing field and are being proactive to do something about it.

The Direct Relief’s Fund for Health Equity awarded the NBNA with a $248,000 grant for the Mini Nurse Academy. The Fund was created to increase access to health care and improve health outcomes for marginalized communities. 

With this grant more mini academies will be able to offer learning modules that include class discussions, guest presentations, interactive hands-on activities and ongoing mentorship. It will also address social determinants of health by educating students about healthy lifestyles, according to the, University of Alabama at Birmingham

In a Direct Relief article Lee said, “Students in our communities probably don’t see people who look like them very often as Nurses. I believe you have to role model, meaning if a Black student or Brown student sees a Registered Nurse, has interactions with a Registered Nurse throughout their youth, then they are more apt to become a Registered Nurse if they can get information, if they can know what that profession is about. And they’re more apt to want to emulate what they see.” 

New programs will begin in the Fall of 2022 in Florida, Louisiana, Missouri, Illinois, Connecticut, Oregon, and South Carolina. 

Topics: diversity in nursing, NBNA, national black nurses association, mini nurse academies

Health Systems Addressing Racism in Nursing

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Feb 17, 2022 @ 03:59 PM

GettyImages-1217965352The National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing defines racism as "Assaults on the human spirit in the form of biases, prejudices, and an ideology of superiority that persistently cause moral suffering and perpetuate injustices and inequities."

The Commission surveyed over 5,600 Nurses and found racism to be a significant problem in the field. Results show:

63% of Nurses personally experienced an act of racism in the workplace with the transgressors being either a peer (66%), patients (63%), or a manager or supervisor (60%).

56% of Nurses say racism in the workplace has negatively impacted their professional well-being.

“We are still living through the structural racism that is embedded in America,” says Quanna Batiste-Brown, DNP, RN, Chief Nursing Officer in Ambulatory Care at UCLA Health. “I think addressing it in Nursing is one of the things we can do to move forward.”

Along with addressing the issue, health systems are using various strategies to help eradicate Racism in Nursing.  

Establishing A Task Force

A task force or Council is usually a group consisting of healthcare leaders such as Chief Nursing Officers (CNO), Chief Diversity Officers (CDO), clinical and non clinical staff.

Seattle Children's task force is comprised of Nurses, coaches, Inclusion Network members, Physicians, support staff, scientists and leaders who developed the Health Equity and Anti-Racism Action Plan

The Action Plan aims to drive systemwide change that will be measured and reported out publicly on a quarterly basis.

Nurses at UCLA Health established a council called Unity in Diversity (UID). The primary purpose of UID is to assess, plan, implement and continuously improve actions toward establishing an authentic environment of equity, diversity, and inclusion for patients, trainees, and Nursing staff. 

Karen Grimley, PhD, MBA, RN, Chief Nursing Executive for UCLA Health told Becker's Hospital Review, "That group dovetails into the health system steering committee that's been created by our Chief health, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Officer. So, we've tried to put a system in place that's going to identify and begin to address cultural norms that may be contributing to systemic bias and racism."

Education And Training

Mount Sinai Health System created the United in Solidarity Resource Guide. This guide is a catalogue of educational articles and resources to learn about racism, prejudice, and bias in America as well as causes to support the fight against injustice. 

Mass General Brigham launched its first system-wide anti-racism educational program, titled Stepping Stones. Stepping Stones was designed to allow viewers to understand how racism exists and functions in our society - and how they can combat it.

RWJ Barnabas Health compiled a list of educational anti-racism resources such as implicit bias tests, white privilege checklist, and a systemic racism video series. 

Diverse Leadership

Hiring Nurses that represent diverse communities is essential. They provide opportunities to administer quality care because of their understanding of various cultures, languages, gender identities, ethnicities, etc. Having diverse Nurses in leadership positions can play a crucial role in breaking down barriers such as discrimination in Nursing.

Staff from diverse backgrounds with histories of discrimination in healthcare may feel reassured when they see people who look like them in leadership positions. They may also feel more comfortable coming forward and reporting an incident of racism or discrimination.

No matter which initiatives a hospital implements, it must start with awareness and identifying any structural biases or barriers.

Marcus Henderson, MSN, RN, lecturer from the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Family and Community Health, said “To adequately and effectively address health inequities and social determinants of health, Nursing must first look inward to address the inequity, lack of diversity, discrimination, and racism that lies within the profession. It’s not hiding. It has always been in plain sight.”

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Topics: racism in healthcare, systemic racism, racism in nursing

Crushing Male Nurses Stigmas and Stereotypes

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Feb 10, 2022 @ 12:18 PM

GettyImages-1303868827Men become Nurses for the same reason women do, to take care of people. And even though Male Nurses are becoming more common, they still face constant stereotyping on the job.

In order to provide optimum care and reduce health disparities, our healthcare professionals should be as diverse as the patient population they serve. This means Men must become equally represented in the Nursing field.

Increasing the number of Men in Nursing is seen as difficult because of social stigmas and stereotypes. Some common stereotypes that must be crushed are:

Women's Work

Nursing is viewed as a female dominated profession, but that is changing. Back in the 1960's Men made up about 2% of Nurses in the United States. In 2021, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, that number is closer to 13%. 

People tend to associate caregiving and nurturing with women's roles and simply because of their gender, Men are believed to be lacking these things and can't be a good Nurse. This of course isn't true. 

This misconception can dissuade skilled and caring men from entering the field, preventing them from truly helping people.

“In my neighborhood, especially my old friends, they always thought that being a Nurse was a job for females,” said Geovany Ruiz, who plans to work as an Oncology Nurse. “So, I put off being a Nurse for a long time. But when it comes down to doing the job, it doesn’t matter if you’re male or female. We can both do the job.”

Sexual Orientation

Other stereotypes that branch from the field being female dominated is Men's sexual orientation, including the belief that male Nurses are Gay. Or the opposite belief that Men join the profession with a higher female to male ratio with the idea that they have a better chance to achieve relationships.

"It's important to note this stereotype is often fueled by a patient's own insecurities and fears. Don't take it personally; keep calm and be patient with them. Again, educating patients on the evolving role of Nursing and how it's not a gender-specific role can help combat this stereotype," advises George Zangaro, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean at Walden University School of Nursing.

Doctor or Failed Doctor

Some people see a Man in scrubs or with a stethoscope and assume he is a Doctor. Other people assume that when a Male Nurse isn't a Doctor it's because he failed to become one. This harmful stereotype is rooted in the belief that Nurses are inferior to Physicians and that Nurses are Women and Doctors are Men.

Television and movies have a strong influence on society’s perception of Men and Women in healthcare.

Mark Gustin, RN, at Brandon Regional Hospital said, “The worst thing for Men in Nursing was 'Meet the Parents' because it emphasized the social stigma that Women are Nurses and Men are Doctors, Directors, and CEOs.”

A great way to combat these stereotypes is by educating patients that Nursing is not gender-specific and that Women are also entering a number of typically male-dominated fields.

Topics: male nurse, male nurses, nursing profession, male nurse stereotypes

Cultural Mental Healthcare Disparities

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Feb 02, 2022 @ 11:39 AM

GettyImages-1308910334There are large disparities in mental healthcare across races and ethnicities in the U.S. Many factors contribute to the poor mental health outcomes of minority populations. Such as:

  • Inaccessible mental healthcare services
  • Transportation issues, difficulty finding childcare/taking time off work
  • Lacking health insurance coverage
  • Cultural stigma regarding mental healthcare
  • The lack of Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) healthcare professionals
  • Racism, bias, and discrimination in healthcare
  • Language barriers

African Americans develop mental health conditions at a similar rate as the general population however, they are less likely to seek care. 

Statistics tell us that about 25% of African Americans seek mental health care, compared to 40% of whites.

Only 1 in 3 Black adults who need mental health care receive it, according to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Mental Health Facts for African Americans guide. 

Research shows American Indian/Alaska Native populations have disproportionately higher rates of mental health problems than the general population.

The overall death rate from suicide for American Indian/Alaska Native adults is about 20% higher compared to the non-Hispanic white population.

In 2019, suicide was the second leading cause of death for American Indian/Alaska Natives between the ages of 10 and 34. 

According to Mental Health America (MHA), Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are the least likely racial group in the U.S. to seek mental health services.

Findings from the National Latino and Asian American Study also found that 17.3% of Asian Americans will be diagnosed with a psychiatric condition at some point in their lifetime.

The APA Mental Health Facts for Hispanics and Latinos/as guide reported Hispanics are at lower risk of most psychiatric disorders compared with non-Hispanic whites.

Also Hispanics are more likely to report poor communication with their health provider. Several studies have found that bilingual patients are evaluated differently when interviewed in English as opposed to Spanish and that Hispanics are more frequently undertreated.

It will take enormous effort to reduce disparities in the U.S. In order to achieve mental health equity we must improve access, hire more multicultural providers, offer better insurance coverage, and provide education surrounding stigma and misconceptions.

Resources

African American Mental Health Providers

Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective

Inclusive Therapists

Therapy for Black Men

The National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association

Find an Asian Therapist

Center for Traditional Medicine

One Sky Center

Indian Health Service

American Society of Hispanic Psychiatry

Therapy for LatinX

The National Alliance for Hispanic Health

SAMHSA’s National Helpline

National Institute of Mental Health brochures and fact sheets

Podcasts

Homecoming Podcast

All My Relations Podcast

The Melanated Social Work Podcast

Between Sessions Podcast

The Full Well Podcast

MannMukti: Mental Health Podcast

Asian Mental & Emotional Health Podcasts

Latinx Therapy Podcast

The Latinx Mental Health Podcast

Topics: mental health, minority mental health, cultural mental health disparities, mental health disparities

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