DiversityNursing Blog

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg And Wife Donate $25 Million To Fight Ebola

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Oct 15, 2014 @ 11:34 AM

By  JAMES MARTIN

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Dr. Priscilla Chan are donating $25 million to the CDC Foundation to help fight the Ebola epidemic, which has taken the lives of more than 4,000 people and continues to rage out of control in West Africa.

The donation will be used for the CDC Ebola response effort in the most severely affected countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and other areas of the world where the disease poses the greatest threat, the foundation said Tuesday.

"The Ebola epidemic is at a critical turning point," Zuckerberg said Tuesday in a statement posted on Facebook. "It has infected 8,400 people so far, but it is spreading very quickly and projections suggest it could infect 1 million people or more over the next several months if not addressed."

The CDC Foundation says the money will go towards urgent needs on the ground, including equipping community care centers, hiring and training local staff, identifying Ebola cases and tracing contacts, vehicles to be used for specimen transport, burial support, and translation services and communications -- all of which it says are vital to fighting the outbreak.

"The most important step we can take is to stop Ebola at its source," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said in a statement. "The sooner the world comes together to help West Africa, the safer we all will be." He said today's "significant contribution from Mark Zuckerberg and Dr. Priscilla Chan will help us rapidly advance the fight against Ebola."

Source: www.cbsnews.com

Topics: Ebola, West Africa, epidemic, Mark Zuckerberg, Dr. Priscilla Chan, CDC, Facebook, donation

Nurses and Facebook: What You Need to Know

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Mar 17, 2014 @ 12:24 PM

by Danielle Logacho

Let’s say you’re a nurse at a local hospital. For the past several weeks, you’ve been for afacebook resized 600 young boy who needs a heart transplant.

One day, you learn that a donor organ has become available. You are elated – and you decide to share the news on your Facebook page.

“Great news! A new heart has been found for my five-year-old patient at Children’s. Be brave, Aiden – we’re all rooting for you!”

Good idea? Not really.

That’s because a post like this – while well intentioned – is a breach of confidentiality. There’s enough information here to identify the patient, his condition and the hospital where he is receiving treatment. Put it all together, and you’ve got yourself a HIPAA violation.

The truth is, there can be real consequences to nurses’ irresponsible use of social media. State boards of nursing may investigate reports of inappropriate disclosures on Facebook and other social media sites. If the allegations are found to be true, nurses can face reprimands, sanctions, fines, or temporary or permanent loss of their nursing license.

Many organizations have social media policies that govern employees’ use of social media, even if it’s for personal purposes. If yours is one of them, be sure to read and understand the guidelines.

Even if your employer does not have a specific policy, the main rule of thumb should be familiar to you: as a nurse, you have the legal and ethical obligation to maintain patient privacy and confidentiality. 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) specifically defines “identifiable information” and when and how it can be used. Such identifiable information could cover the past, present or future health of a patient, or it could be something that would lead someone to believe that it could be used to identify a patient.  Brush up on your understanding of HIPAA.

How do you avoid problems? Do you need to stop using Facebook altogether if you’re a nurse? No, but you do need to be careful. Here are a few general guidelines:

- Simply put: Don’t reveal any personal health information about your patients in your posts. (And don’t think that it’s OK if you reveal their details but give them a fake name.)

- Don’t post any photos of your patients, even if they are cute kids. Photos are specifically called out in HIPAA as identifiable information.

- Maintain professional boundaries, even online. Friending your patients or patients’ families is, in most cases, a no-no. The Mayo Clinic’s guidelines for employees say, “Staff in patient care roles generally should not initiate or accept friend requests except in unusual circumstances such as the situation where an in-person friendship pre-dates the treatment relationship.”

- Don’t rely on privacy settings. No matter how meticulous you are about privacy settings, there’s no guarantee that a friend won’t like your post so much that she takes a screenshot and posts your “private” message elsewhere.

- Remember that anything online will be there forever, even if you delete it. Someone may have taken a screenshot before you took your post down. If you are under investigation, your posts can be still found on servers.

For more information, read A Nurse’s Guide to the Use of Social Media from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

 

These guidelines are for informational purposes only and are not legal advice.

 

References

National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (2011). A Nurse’s Guide to the Use of Social Media [Brochure]. Retrieved from https://www.ncsbn.org/NCSBN_SocialMedia.pdf

Pagana, K. (2014, January 21). Facebook: Know the Policy Before Posting [Webinar]. In Nurse.com Continuing Education series. Retrieved from http://ce.nurse.com/course/ce630/facebook/.

Source: Chamberlain College of Nursing 

Topics: nursing, social media, Facebook, HIPPA, caution

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