DiversityNursing Blog

This Photo Of A New Mom And Her Nurse Goes Viral

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Sep 25, 2017 @ 01:08 PM

21728093_10154618859726627_4483838069848273731_n.jpgAppreciation – we love to feel appreciated for what we do, but often, it feels like our work sometimes goes unnoticed. Here’s a story we think you’ll enjoy. It’s all about appreciation and the work Nurses do. This is a big Thank You to Labor & Delivery Nurses, Midwives and Doula’s.

Mother of four, Jill Krause, recently saw a photo by Katie Lacer that moved her. She was overcome with memories and gratitude for the Nurses. Jill shared the photo with her thoughts about the labor, delivery, and postpartum Nurses who help new mothers in their most vulnerable moments. The post quickly went viral and mothers everywhere commented their experiences and shared their thanks to all the Nurses out there.  Below is Jill's post, check it out and leave your thoughts in the comment sections!

"I'll never forget the faces of the nurses who followed me into the bathroom after delivering each baby. That moment when I was so vulnerable, so tired, scared, shaky. My swollen belly deflating, and my modesty long gone. They treated me with such kindness and dignity. For me, these have been moments of empowerment and confirmation that I have a real village to help me, even if just for that little bit of time in a bathroom, on a toilet, while a kind nurse shows me how to put an ice pad on my mesh undies. This photo by my friend MommaKT Shoots just takes me right back. Like, I can smell the Dermaplast. Let's hear it for the nurses and the doulas and anyone else who shows us how to make ice pad underwear (or helps with that first shower post c-section!) <3"

Posts came pouring in from moms all over! Below are some of the posts that were shared.

"When I was pushing, I'll never forget pulling my face away from my nurse's chest to see her scrub top SOAKED with my sweat and tears. I was like, 'Oh my god I'm so sorry!' And she said, 'Baby, this is life all over my shirt. Nowhere else I'd rather be. Now let's get that baby out.'" —Leigh Kathleen, Facebook

sub-buzz-4384-1505429714-1.pngPictured: Joanie McConnell, CNM at the University of Louisville by Katie Lacer / Via mommaktshoots.com

"I will never forget the nurse that helped me get to the bathroom for the first time after I had my daughter. I was hemorrhaging and when I stood it was so humiliating...but that kind soul didn't flinch. I kept apologizing and she kept reassuring me that it was nothing. I will never forget watching her clean my legs and I just kept thinking that this is what my God means when he says love your neighbor." —Tiffany Barnes

"My husband and I lost our daughter at 23 weeks two years ago, and delivered our rainbow baby boy at the same hospital this May. All the nurses I had knew our history, and when my son was born he wasn't breathing. He was immediately taken away to the NICU and I just could not stop sobbing. My nurses cried with me. They rubbed my hair and my back and did everything they possibly could to get me mobile and up to see my sweet boy in the NICU." —Lauren Self, Facebook

Thank you Nurses!
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Pictured: NICU nurse at Norton Women's & Children's Hospital discusses care measures for one of Amanda and Lauren Vinova's preemie triplets. By Katie Lacer / Via mommaktshoots.com

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Topics: labor nurses, delivery nurse, birth photo, viral nurse photo, new moms, thank nurses, midwives, doula

5 Things Labor Nurses Want You To Know

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Jul 09, 2015 @ 10:47 AM

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Shelly Lopez Gray

Recently, a nurse made headlines for dropping a newborn, fracturing the baby's skull. The parents, understandably upset, claim the nurse should have known better than to hold the baby if she was sleepy. As a labor and delivery nurse, here is what I wish I could say to every mother out there, what I'm sure many of us would want to say to the families we care for:

Accidentally hurting your baby is one of our biggest fears. No nurse goes to work thinking they want to hurt someone. None of us leave our house thinking, "I really want to make someone suffer." There are a million and one ways a nurse can accidentally do something wrong. And every day, all day, we are very conscious of this fact and we work hard to provide the best care we possibly can... even if we're short-staffed, even if our assignments are difficult, even if every room on our unit is full. Even though we literally have 20 things to do at any given moment with a handful of different, complicated patients, we strive to provide compassionate care in a timely manner while struggling to chart every single action we take. We know we're going to make mistakes... our only hope is that the mistakes we make do not cause harm.

That nurse made a lot of right decisions. I'm just keeping it real -- but seriously, that nurse could have made a lot of other really bad decisions. She could have dropped the baby and not told anyone. Even though she was probably frightened and distraught that her action caused a baby harm, she chose to do the right thing and immediately get the baby evaluated.

A nurse's mistake can have many consequences. No one is asking why the nurse had the baby in the first place. I would bet any amount of money that she was trying to allow an exhausted mother to get a few minutes of uninterrupted sleep. And although I do not agree with this practice, I'm sure her intentions were pure. What people who are not nurses do not understand is that our mistakes can have many consequences. If we make a mistake, we can be peer-reviewed, which means our actions are brought before a committee to determine our nursing fate. We could lose our nursing license, leaving us unable to work or financially support ourselves or our family. If it's deemed we were neglectful, criminal charges could be filed against us, and we could face hefty fines or even jail time. And our actions at work and at home are all up for examination and scrutiny.

That nurse is suffering right now. I don't say this to diminish any anguish the family must feel that their baby was hurt while in the care of a healthcare provider. But wherever that nurse is right now, I promise you that she has been suffering. As I said before, no nurse goes to work wanting to hurt someone. She has had to endure being judged by her peers, questioning whether or not her facility would support her, and knowing that she caused a family distress. This is an incident that she will never forget, an incident that will probably taint her 30-year memory of nursing.

If you would have dropped your baby while in the hospital, the nurse would also be blamed. I don't believe healthy mothers and healthy babies should be separated while in the hospital. I don't believe a nurse should take a baby from a mother, even at her request, so that the mother can get uninterrupted sleep. This may not be a popular opinion, but as nurses, we need to see how these mothers interact with their babies even when they're exhausted and sleep-deprived. But this leads to another issue... even if this mother would have dropped her own baby, the nurse and hospital would still be blamed. It would have been all about rounding and if it was documented that the nurse educated the patient not to sleep with the baby in the bed or if the room was free of clutter. As nurses, we have to be everything to everyone.

We are all human. As I drive to work tomorrow, I will think of the patients I will meet and care for. And as I walk through the doors of my hospital, I will think the same thing I have thought every single day since I graduated from nursing school: Just don't hurt anyone. I know I will make mistakes. I'm human. But I hope I never make a mistake that hurts or kills someone. And that is a fear that lives inside of every nurse everywhere. My thoughts are with this family, and my thoughts are also with this nurse. To every nurse out there -- May the mistakes we make tomorrow bring no harm to the patients we try to give so much to.

Until my next delivery ♥

www.huffingtonpost.com

Topics: nursing, nurses, patients, hospital, labor nurses

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