DiversityNursing Blog

Cow's Milk Found In Human Breast Milk Purchased Online

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Apr 08, 2015 @ 11:31 AM

Written by James McIntosh

www.medicalnewstoday.com 

two cows grazing in a field resized 600Researchers testing the origins of human breast milk samples available for purchase online found that around 10% of the samples they examined contained significant amounts of added cow's milk.

The pressure on parents to feed newborn infants with breast milk may be leading many to purchase human breast milk online. However, the milk they receive from online vendors may not match up to what is being offered.

"They purchase the milk online based on a posted description of the type and quantity of the milk or the health habits of the seller," writes study author Dr. Sarah Keim. "But when they think they're getting nutritious, high-quality breast milk, some of them are actually receiving human milk mixed with cow's milk."

Human breast milk is widely recognized as providing many health benefits to young infants. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), breastfeeding can protect against diseases and conditions such as diarrheadiabetes and childhood obesity.

However, many new mothers find themselves unable to breastfeed. In 2012, a survey published in Pediatrics found that two-thirds of mothers nursing newborns are unable to manage breastfeeding for as long as they intended.

"Some women are unable to produce enough milk for their infant or perceive they cannot meet their infant's needs, yet they may be reluctant to feed formula," write the researchers of the new study. For these mothers, the Internet represents an alternative way of providing human milk for their children.

'You do not truly know what you are receiving'

For the study, published in Pediatrics, Dr. Keim and her colleagues purchased 102 samples of what was advertised as human milk from sellers on the Internet. These milk samples were subjected to DNA testing in order to verify their human origins and to assess whether any cow's milk was also present.

While all of the purchased Internet samples contained human DNA, 11 also contained bovine DNA. Of these, 10 contained bovine DNA concentrations significant enough to suggest that cow's milk had been added to human milk, being so high that accidental contamination was unlikely.

The inclusion of cow's milk in human breast milk can be problematic for babies. It can potentially be harmful due to cow's milk allergies, health conditions or formula sensitivities. The inclusion of cow's milk could also reduce a baby's access to the essential nutrients and fats that are in formulas and human breast milk but not cow milk.

"The truth of the matter is that you do not truly know what you are receiving when you buy milk from a stranger over the Internet," explains Dr. Keim.

"Selling breast milk gives people an incentive to add cow's milk or formula to the milk in order to sell more. When money is involved in an unregulated process like this, you cannot know for sure that the milk is safe to give to your baby."

Although the sample used in the study is acknowledged as small by the authors, they state the sample is representative of Internet sellers and has given the researchers findings that may at least generalize to milk being sold via the Internet.

"Our findings confirm the previously theoretical risk that human milk being sold via the Internet may not be 100% human milk," the authors conclude. "Because buyers have little means to verify the composition of the milk they receive, all should be aware of the possibility that it may be adulterated."

Previously, in a report published in The BMJ, experts claimed that breast milk purchased online can pose serious health risks to infants, largely due to a lack of regulation. Human milk is not tested for contamination or disease and could be stored incorrectly.

Topics: infants, newborn, health, online, babies, breast milk, milk, feeding, formulas

Rise of the Nurse Practitioner

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Mar 21, 2014 @ 12:33 PM

TheRiseoftheNursePractitioner 2 27 resized 600

TheRiseoftheNursePractitioner 2 27 resized 600Source: Maryville University 

Topics: growth, education, nursing, online, nurse practitioner

Norwich University Future of Nursing

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Feb 14, 2014 @ 12:39 PM

The nursing profession is facing multiple challenges in the years ahead. From the Affordable Care Act and its focus on the introduction of electronic medical records, to the aging US population, many people question what healthcare will look like in the future.

What remains certain, however, is the future of nursing is bright. Nurses are a vital part of the health care system and a valuable resource for our society.

What can nurses and nursing industry expect in the years ahead?

At this point in time:

- One third of nurses are over 50 years old.
- 1/3 of the current workforce will reach retirement within the next decade or so.
- Nurses work more hours now than they did in 2000.

How the Health Care Reform Will Affect Nurses

Nurses will be prepared to take on more responsibility than they currently have.

This will be helpful, since:

- Within 15 years, the country will be short 150,000 doctors.
- Primary Care Physicians (PCP) will be in the greatest demand, with an estimated 45,000 needed by 2020.
- Millions of new patients are expected to flood the healthcare system as new insurance takes hold.
- More nurses will work in rural areas where the nurse may be the only health care provider available.

Ever-Changing Technology

As we move into the future, nursing will change thanks to new technology, such as:
- The Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) will reduce medication errors by about 55%.
- Medication will be scanned before the patient takes it, to ensure correct dosage and type.
- Transcriptions can be replaced by CPOE.
- Electronic medical records will link hospitals, physician’s practices and home healthcare agencies.

To learn more about the future of nursing, checkout the infographic below created by Norwich University’s Online Master of Science in Nursing program.

The nursing profession is facing multiple challenges in the years ahead. From the Affordable Care Act and its focus on the introduction of electronic medical records, to the aging US population, many people question what healthcare will look like in the future.

What remains certain, however, is the future of nursing is bright. Nurses are a vital part of the health care system and a valuable resource for our society.

What can nurses and nursing industry expect in the years ahead?

At this point in time:

- One third of nurses are over 50 years old.
- 1/3 of the current workforce will reach retirement within the next decade or so.
- Nurses work more hours now than they did in 2000.

How the Health Care Reform Will Affect Nurses

Nurses will be prepared to take on more responsibility than they currently have.

This will be helpful, since:

- Within 15 years, the country will be short 150,000 doctors.
- Primary Care Physicians (PCP) will be in the greatest demand, with an estimated 45,000 needed by 2020.
- Millions of new patients are expected to flood the healthcare system as new insurance takes hold.
- More nurses will work in rural areas where the nurse may be the only health care provider available.

Ever-Changing Technology

As we move into the future, nursing will change thanks to new technology, such as:
- The Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) will reduce medication errors by about 55%.
- Medication will be scanned before the patient takes it, to ensure correct dosage and type.
- Transcriptions can be replaced by CPOE.
- Electronic medical records will link hospitals, physician’s practices and home healthcare agencies.

To learn more about the future of nursing, checkout the infographic below created by Norwich University’s Online Master of Science in Nursing program.

The nursing profession is facing multiple challenges in the years ahead. From the Affordable Care Act and its focus on the introduction of electronic medical records, to the aging US population, many people question what healthcare will look like in the future.

What remains certain, however, is the future of nursing is bright. Nurses are a vital part of the health care system and a valuable resource for our society.

What can nurses and nursing industry expect in the years ahead?

At this point in time:

- One third of nurses are over 50 years old.
- 1/3 of the current workforce will reach retirement within the next decade or so.
- Nurses work more hours now than they did in 2000.

How the Health Care Reform Will Affect Nurses

Nurses will be prepared to take on more responsibility than they currently have.

This will be helpful, since:

- Within 15 years, the country will be short 150,000 doctors.
- Primary Care Physicians (PCP) will be in the greatest demand, with an estimated 45,000 needed by 2020.
- Millions of new patients are expected to flood the healthcare system as new insurance takes hold.
- More nurses will work in rural areas where the nurse may be the only health care provider available.

Ever-Changing Technology

As we move into the future, nursing will change thanks to new technology, such as:
- The Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) will reduce medication errors by about 55%.
- Medication will be scanned before the patient takes it, to ensure correct dosage and type.
- Transcriptions can be replaced by CPOE.
- Electronic medical records will link hospitals, physician’s practices and home healthcare agencies.

To learn more about the future of nursing, checkout the infographic below created by Norwich University’s Online Master of Science in Nursing program.

norwichuniversity resized 600Source: Norwich University Online

Topics: growth, technology, nurses, online, Future of Nursing, Norwich University

Too Busy to Go to Nursing School? There Are Options

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Jan 06, 2014 @ 12:03 PM

Nurses earn a mean annual wage of $67,930, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, andsocialmonster
the demand for compassionate and skillful nurses is expected to grow by 26 percent between 2010 and 2020. The journey to become a nurse requires a bachelor's degree or an associate's degree, which means two to four years in the classroom as well as clinical experience in a hospital or clinical setting.

If you are a busy mom already juggling kids and work, finding the time to complete a nursing degree may seem impossible, but the wide selection of online Nursing programs available and the recent expansions in learning technologies are making this career path more feasible.

Online Degrees

There are online programs available that allow students to study both the science and art of nursing. In addition to covering diagnoses, anatomy, drugs, and other science-based topics, aspiring nurses can also learn interpersonal skills like how to be sensitive to patients and their families. These programs appeal to busy people who don't have the time to attend classes during conventional hours, but they are often used by nurses who are ready to take their career to the next level as well.

Masters in Nursing

Nurse practitioners armed with masters degrees can diagnose, treat, and manage a number of diseases and conditions, according to the National Library of Medicine. Nurse practitioners work in cardiology, women's health, or other areas of health care, and they usually earn more and have more responsibilities than their nursing peers. Some nurses even use their master's degree as a launchpad into the administration side of healthcare.

Simulation

Thanks to simulations, many student nurses can now bypass the requirement to shadow professional nurses. This makes pursuing a nursing degree easier for students who are juggling multiple responsibilities or nurses who live in remote areas with few shadowing opportunities.

Advance Healthcare Network reports that nurses can simulate oxygen delivery, work with infusion pumps, and practice other procedures in simulation learning centers. In addition to making learning more flexible for students, simulations also give nurses the chance to think more critically in a safe environment. Students can take a few moments to be extra thoughtful about a situation, without the pressure of worrying that they may lose a real patient with the wrong decision.

Apps Lighten the Load

With your bag already packed to the brim with sippy cups, extra clothing, and other kid-related supplies, you probably don't even have the energy or the strength to haul a massive bag of nursing textbooks around with you. Luckily, there are a host of apps, designed to lighten the load for nursing students.

Apps like Nursing Central have copies of essential reference books like Davis' Drug Guide, selected MEDLINE journals, Taber's Medical Dictionary, and others on them. Essentials for busy students, these apps also prepare aspiring nurses for the use of apps professionally. Recent studies indicate that 90 percent of healthcare professionals avoid misdiagnoses and prescription mishaps when they double check things with apps, according to Medlineplus. Studies like these prove that much of the technology that can help busy people to get nursing degrees will soon be popping up in professional settings as well.

Topics: nursing, apps, technology, online, degree, MSN

Online RN to MSN

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Jun 21, 2013 @ 01:11 PM

onlineRNtoMSN resized 600

Source: Online RN to MSN | University of Arizona College of Nursing

Topics: nursing, RN, online, college, benefits, MSN

Adrian Espinosa is part of a still extremely small but growing trend in nursing. He’s a man.

Posted by Wilson Nunnari

Mon, Mar 18, 2013 @ 10:46 AM

Adrian Espinosa is part of a still extremely small but growing trend in nursing. He’s a man.

Espinosa, now a student at the University of San Francisco School of Nursing, said he quickly became aware that he is a man in a field that continues to be dominated by women.

“From the first day I started nursing school last year, as one of seven males in a class of 77, I realized that I would have to find my fit in a predominately female profession,” Espinosa said. His goal is to become a nurse practitioner “to fulfill a huge gap in primary care for under-represented populations.”

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 In a 2012 essay written for the American Assembly for Men in Nursing Scholarship, Espinosa said his route to his chosen career was anything but direct.

“My journey into nursing wasn’t immediate, but my path was illuminated when I began working in community public health,” Espinosa wrote. “Watching nurses and nurse practitioners work with diverse populations inspired me to pursue the nursing culture in the hope of providing accessible care for marginalized communities.

 The nursing community knows it needs more people like Espinosa in its ranks and it is working hard to increasing nurse diversity.

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, in 2008, there were 3,063,163 licensed registered nurses in the United States. Only 6.6% of those were men and 16.8% were non-Caucasian. Despite efforts from nursing schools across the nation to recruit and retain more men and minorities, the results have been fairly modest.  In 2010, approximately 11% of the students in BSN programs were men and 26.8% were a racial/ethnic minority.

Click HERE to Register now to earn your nursing degree online in as little as 15 months.
$6,000 scholarships are now being awarded, along with Apple iPads and free textbooks to enhance the learning experience.

This is one reason why the University of Mary in Bismarck, ND prides itself on  providing "a nursing education for leadership and moral courage" and places an emphasis on diversity.

“U-Mary is a community of learners that recognizes and respects diversity and the richness it brings to the college experience,” according the catalog of the private, Catholic university that offers degree completion and advanced nursing degrees online and on campus.

University of Mary prides itself as “community that fosters diversity through hospitality and dialogue so as to learn to live in an interconnected world.”

Why are more men and people of color needed in today’s nursing ranks? To help meet the medical and personal needs of the United States’ increasingly diverse patient population that is adding varied ethnic, racial and cultural traditions to the country. Patient stories such as these from the University of California, San Francisco are good examples.

  • Selena Martinez was diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome, a genetic disease that can lead to a wide-range of cancers. It wasn't until 2008 that the Martinez family, which in just 16 years had 13 cancer diagnoses among nine people, received a conclusive diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome.
  • Simone Chou, was in her last year at the University of California, Berkeley when she learned she had lupus and that her immune system was attacking her kidneys. After nine years of treatment failed to slow the deterioration, Chou and her doctors launched a nationwide search to find a compatible kidney donor. They didn’t have far to look. Michael Wong, a college friend, stepped up. Wong, a practicing Buddhist, had read many stories about Buddhist saints who donated their body parts to other people. "When I first heard Simone talk about needing a kidney transplant, I remembered those stories."
  • Doris Ward is one of the pioneering African-American politicians in the San Francisco Bay Area. She started her career as a trustee of the San Francisco Community College District, became a County Supervisor in 1980, President of the Board of Supervisors in 1990 and finally moved on to spend the last 10 years as the San Francisco County Assessor. She is also a breast cancer survivor. Ward now helps other African-American women through their own journey with cancer by sending them information and helping them understand their options.

“Nursing’s leaders recognize a strong connection between a culturally diverse nursing workforce and the ability to provide quality, culturally competent patient care,” according to a policy statement by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

 “Though nursing has made great strides in recruiting and graduating nurses that mirror the patient population, more must be done before adequate representation becomes a reality,” the association statement added.

The University of Mary is ready to help ensure that the nursing ranks reflect the diversity of our nation. For a welcoming environment, online or on campus, to get your advanced practice nursing degree, contact the University of Mary.

Topics: men, diversity in nursing, men in healthcare, university of mary, diversity, online, degree

Online nurse training enables long distance learning

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Dec 10, 2012 @ 03:29 PM

By Dr. Sapna Parikh 

Video

New technology is helping medical professionals learn from each other, even though they're 1,500 miles apart.

A patient has chills and a fever. Students at Columbia University School of Nursing discuss the diagnosis with their classmates. But they also talk to people in a little box--the medical team at a clinic in La Romana in the Dominican Republic.

Norma Hannigan said she got the idea while she was at the clinic last April. Why not discuss medical cases and learn from each other?

"We're a little stronger on the primary care chronic illness end of the spectrum, and they're much stronger on the infectious disease," Hannigan, an assistant professor of clinical nursing.

The students were presented a patient with diabetes and everyone had to figure out how they'd solve it together.

"The way we manage the case here versus the way they would manage the case in the Dominican Republic is very different," Stephanie Paine, a nurse practitioner student, explained.

It was surprising to learn, for example, they almost never do a test called Hemoglobin A1C. It's too expensive, but in the U.S., that test is done for diabetics all the time.

Students can also learn about cultural differences. In Washington Heights, many of the residents are from the Dominican Republic.

"It's a way to improve the way we treat patients," said Dr. Leonel Lerebours, the medical director of La Clinica de Familia in La Romana, Dominican Republic.

Lerebours says they have learned to work with fewer resources.

"We rely more on clinical features than lab," he said.

This is the first long distance webinar, but they say it won't be the last.

"Maybe incorporate more people from the school of public health from the school of medicine," Hannigan suggested.

"It's really good," Martha Yepes said. "We're able to have this exchange, especially with the technology that we have now."

There were, of course, some technical challenges; the connection was slow at times, and it's hard to capture excitement or enthusiasm when you're doing it over the web.

But there were also funny moments. Where what we consider a problem here, La Romana's medical team thinks it's normal.


Topics: learning, student nurse, technology, training, online

Registered nurses can earn bachelor’s degree in nursing online through UTB-TSC program

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Wed, Dec 05, 2012 @ 03:20 PM

By JESUS CHAVEZ Special to the Herald

describe the imageWhen Delia Jasso began her first class in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program in spring 2012 at the University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College, she gained a vision of a better, healthier future for her family, her patients and herself.

Jasso, 39, is a registered nurse who took classes online from her home in Donna. She will graduate with a 4.0 grade point average and receive her bachelor’s degree in nursing on Dec. 15 at the university’s 2012 Winter Commencement on the Cardenas South Hall Lawn.

“In a lot of places, they won’t hire you if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree,” Jasso said. “This program has given me the skills to be an effective leader in any future nursing position I apply for. I believe my quality of life has drastically improved not only for me but for my family and patients as well.”

The RN-BSN Program provides registered nurses the opportunity to obtain a bachelor’s degree in nursing by taking courses online. The deadline to apply for the program for the spring semester is Dec. 9.

“Being in the program taught me a lot about my potential for leadership as a nurse,” she said. “It’s taught me how to be an informal as well as a formal leader in my working environment.”

Jasso wants to set an example for her six siblings that a good education is vital for a better quality of life.

“I come from a very poor, migrant family,” she said. “I had to work in the fields since I was 11. When I turned 18, I promised myself I would never go back there; I would never give up. I’m pushing my brothers and sisters so hard to educate themselves. You have to get off your feet, educate yourself and improve your life. That’s what I’m doing.”

Jasso worked for 14 years as a surgical technician under Dr. Leonard Tesoro at his otolaryngology clinic in McAllen. During that period her employer saw her potential as a healthcare professional and consistently urged her to continue her education.

“Dr. Tesoro pushed me to go back to school; he gave me many opportunities to go back to school and keep my job,” said Jasso. “I’ve always been the sort of person to help those in medical need, and working with him as a surgical tech made me realize I could do much more as a nurse.”

Jasso received her nursing certification in 2010 and after working for a year she enrolled at UTB and TSC.

“We go into the nursing profession because we’re caring individuals,” said Jasso. “We need to take care of our population and promote help. Before the BSN program, I never thought about what my community needs, but now I’ve realized the ways I can help these vulnerable areas with little innovations such as teaching in our communities.”

Jasso plans to continue her education after she graduates because she said she feels that nurses have a responsibility to be as well educated as possible.

For more information about the RN-BSN online program, contact Lourdes Requena at (956) 882-5070 to schedule an appointment.

Topics: RN, nurse, bachelor degree, online

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