DiversityNursing Blog

Nurse Delivers Baby On Plane

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Dec 08, 2016 @ 03:13 PM

photos.medleyphoto.12439623.jpgThere was a big tiny surprise on a flight leaving Philadelphia. A woman's water broke and luckily a Nurse of 40 years, jumped into action. You might be wondering how the pregnant woman got clearance to fly. Turns out she was only 26 weeks pregnant. The baby, ironically named Jet, was a miracle delivery and is still in the Intensive Care Unit.
 
I can only imagine the panic she was facing on that plane and how thankful she must be for Nurse Bledsoe. The Nurse knew she had to help. Bledsoe said, "I believe that God puts you where you need to be." Have you ever been in the right place at the right time and able to be of assistance in saving a life?

An Orlando nurse who helped deliver a premature baby on a Southwest Airlines flight said she didn’t think twice about jumping in to help.

Baby “Jet” was born 14 weeks early on Sunday and remains in the Intensive Care Unit.

Loretta Bledose works on the business side at Orlando Health, but she was a nurse for 40 years.

That experience was crucial on her way home from a wedding in Philadelphia when a woman went into labor on her flight.

“She said, ‘My water broke. I’m pregnant. My water broke.’ I said, ‘How pregnant are you?’ She said, ’26 weeks.’ I said, ‘Oh, my God,’” said Bledose.

A flight attendant handed Bledose some gloves, and minutes later, the baby was born.

“There was a bulge there and I put my hands down and eased the baby out. She had a little two pound baby,” said Bledose.

A doctor on the plane also helped.

The baby wasn’t due until March 8 and had been cleared to fly by her doctor.

The mother is a nurse at Parrish Medical Center in Titusville, and Bledose said she remained calm throughout the ordeal.

“She kept apologizing, and I said, ‘Honey, this is out of your control,’” said Bledose.  

Bledose held the tiny baby in a blanket as the pilot diverted the plane to Charleston, South Carolina.

“I just kept praying, and every breath, I just kept saying, ‘Keep doing it baby, keep doing it,’” said Bledose.

When it was time for landing, Bledose was on her knees, holding the baby tight.

“I was just hanging on to mom and baby, and I said, ‘Just land, and we’ll be OK,’ and we were,” Bledose said.

The mother and baby were rushed to the hospital. Bledose continued on to Orlando, thankful she played in a role in what she calls a miracle.

“I believe that God puts you where you need to be. I truly believe that,” Bledose said. 

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Topics: emergency delivery, premature birth, gives birth on a plane

Low-Cost Incubator May Save More Babies

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Nov 19, 2014 @ 02:11 PM

By George Putic

MOM inclubator press resized 600

Each year, about one million babies throughout the world die of complications due to premature birth. Many of them could have been saved if given access to an incubator. But this expensive device is sorely lacking in developing countries. A young British researcher says he has found a solution -- a low-cost inflatable incubator.

Doctors say many expectant mothers in developing countries give birth prematurely, especially in refugee camps, largely because of poor diet and unhealthy living conditions.

Premature birth is the biggest killer of children worldwide. Because these tiny babies are born before their lungs are fully developed, they are more susceptible to often deadly infections. But they could survive if placed in an incubator, where they would continue to develop in the closed chamber and warm, controlled environment.

However with a price tag of around $50,000, incubators are out of reach even for some hospitals.

Design engineering student James Roberts, 23,  of Britain says his $400 inflatable incubator may help solve this problem.

“It's basically an insulated piece of air, so it's like the difference between double and single glazing, so it's easier to keep the inside at a stable heat environment, heat temperature," he said.

The inflated incubator is collapsible and when folded resembles an ordinary travel bag.

It is powered through a regular electrical line, but Roberts said he has found a solution in case there is a power outage, which often happens in refugee camps.

“I thought 'why not car batteries?' There's loads of cars out there, they're pretty readily available. So you can plug this into a car battery. It will run for 24 hours and then when the mains [regular electrical line] comes back on, the mains can then charge this battery, and then that can run the incubator," he said.

Roberts' won the $47,000 James Dyson Award earlier this year for his incubator design. He said the project is still in the development phase, but the prize money will help him start a company for the mass manufacturing of inflatable incubators.

Source: www.voanews.com

Topics: health, healthcare, technology, patients, medical, babies, premature birth, incubator, life saving, developing countries

Preemies May Have Higher Risk of Blood Clots, Even as Adults

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jul 28, 2014 @ 12:56 PM

By: Healthday

preemie781

Odds are small, but family, doctors should keep possibility in mind, researchers say.

Babies born prematurely appear to have a slightly increased risk of potentially fatal blood clots that they will carry into adulthood, Swedish researchers report.

Doctors have previously suspected that babies born earlier than 37 weeks' gestation have a raised risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, two serious conditions caused by blood clotting in the veins, the researchers noted in background information.

This new study confirms that link, and takes it even further. Premature birth appears to be linked to an increased chance of blood clots in the veins in childhood and early adulthood, according to findings published online July 28 in the journal Pediatrics.

The researchers also reported that a baby's chances of blood clot-related illnesses are directly related to the degree of prematurity. "The more premature, the higher the risk," said Dr. Edward McCabe, chief medical officer of the March of Dimes. A full-term pregnancy lasts from 39 to 40 weeks.

While parents and doctors should keep this risk in mind, they should also be aware that the risk is not huge, said Dr. Kristi Watterberg, chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics' committee on the fetus and newborn. Watterberg and McCabe were not involved with the study.

The association between premature birth and clot risk seen in the study does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

The study involved 3.5 million babies born in Sweden between 1973 and 2008, including almost 207,000 born preterm. Out of all the births, only about 7,500 children -- 0.2 percent -- suffered either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism later in life.

"I think it's important scientifically to know, but it's such a low incidence phenomenon that there are a lot of things to think about before that," said Watterberg, a professor of pediatrics and neonatology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

Deep vein thrombosis involves blood clots that form in a vein deep in the body. If these clots aren't treated and dissolved, they can break off and travel through the bloodstream to the lungs, causing a blockage called a pulmonary embolism. Such a blockage can be deadly.

For the study, Dr. Bengt Zoller, of the Center for Primary Health Care Research at Lund University in Malmo, Sweden, and colleagues used records from the Swedish Birth Registry to track the babies' health. The researchers found that premature babies had an increased risk of blood clots in their veins in infancy, but also from ages 1 to 5 and from 18 to 38.

Very preterm births -- before 34 weeks of gestation -- also had a risk of blood clot-related illness in adolescence, from age 13 to 17.

Boys had an increased risk of blood clots in infancy, while girls were more likely to carry the risk into adolescence and adulthood, the study authors reported.

No one knows why this increased risk exists, but it could be due to genetic factors that caused the mother to deliver prematurely in the first place, Watterberg and McCabe said.

Diseases such as diabetes, thyroid problems and obesity are genetic in nature and can cause preterm delivery, McCabe said.

Also, some mothers who suffer a genetic deficiency in a key protein that controls blood clotting may be predisposed to give birth prematurely, Watterberg said.

"It may be that maternal genetics are a setup for preterm delivery, and those problems are passed along to the infant," she said.

The mother's wellness and lifestyle also play a role in a baby's lifelong health, and could influence their risk of blood clots, McCabe said.

Finally, this link might arise because the babies are born prematurely, and are robbed of maternal hormones and nutrition in the womb that could have decreased their future risk of blood clots.

"We are not as good at getting nutrition into those babies as the mother and placenta are, and we do know that hormones have something to do with the predisposition to clotting," Watterberg said. "It makes sense to me you'd have changes in those long-term outcomes as well."

In any case, it is something for the family and doctor of a person born prematurely to keep in mind, McCabe said.

"If a patient has a history of preterm birth, and the more preterm, the more attention it needs to have," he said. "It helps us be better prepared. If a patient comes in with unusual findings, this provides us some clue."

Source: http://healthfinder.gov

Topics: patient, researchers, Preemies, blood clots, premature birth, childhood, adulthood

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