DiversityNursing Blog

Hospitals Seeing Increase In Children and Teen Suicide Attempts

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jun 07, 2021 @ 03:31 PM

mentalhealth-1Hospitals are seeing more cases of severe depression and suicidal thoughts among children, particularly attempts to overdose. 

The coronavirus pandemic has drastically changed the way children and teens learn, play and socialize. Many studies found forced isolation and loneliness among children correlated with an increased risk of depression.

Children’s Hospital Colorado, declared a "State of Emergency" in youth mental health. Jena Hausmann, CEO said, "It has been devastating to see suicide become the leading cause of death for Colorado’s children." 

According to the CDC, the proportion of children who arrived in emergency departments with mental health issues increased 24% from March through October 2020, compared with the same period in 2019. Among preteens and adolescents, it rose by 31%. 

Matthew Davis, MD, MAPP, Chair of the Department of Medicine at Lurie Children’s, emphasized the need for accessible, affordable mental health care for pediatric patients has greatly increased because of the pandemic. In fact, nearly 1 in 5 parents said they were unable to access  mental or behavioral health care for their child at some point, most often because they could not find a specialty provider, they could not afford it, or they could not get an appointment in a timely fashion.

Some hospitals like Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio report running at full capacity and having more children “boarding,” or sleeping in EDs before being admitted to the psychiatric unit. 

Terrie Andrews, a Psychologist and Administrator of behavioral health at Wolfson Children’s Hospital in Florida said, "Up to 25 children have been held on surgical floors while waiting for a spot to open in the inpatient psychiatric unit. Their wait could last as long as five days."

Hospitals are not only seeing a higher volume of patients, but these patients have more intense illnesses.

Dr. Jennifer Downs, a pediatric psychiatrist at Connecticut Children’s said, “Instead of seeing kids who are saying, ‘I’m thinking about suicide,’ we’re seeing kids who have had attempts. Instead of seeing kids who are maybe brought in because of parents who feel that they’re verbally out of control, yelling, screaming, saying awful things, we’re seeing kids who are having physical aggression.”

According to The American Academy of Pediatrics, if you notice any of the following symptoms in your children, be sure to contact your child’s Physician as soon as possible:

– unusual changes in mood, such as ongoing irritability, feelings of hopelessness or rage, and frequent conflicts with friends and family
– changes in behavior, such as stepping back from personal relationships
– a loss of interest in activities previously enjoyed
– a hard time falling or staying asleep, or starting to sleep all the time
– changes in appetite, weight, or eating patterns
– problems with memory, thinking, or concentration
– less interest in schoolwork and drop in academic effort
– changes in appearance, such as lack of basic personal hygiene
– an increase in risky or reckless behaviors, such as using drugs or alcohol

If you have contemplated suicide or someone you know has talked about it, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or use the online Lifeline Chat, both available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Topics: mental health, depression, children, teens, suicide, attempted suicide, overdose

Healthcare Organizations Commitment To Improving Diversity

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, May 25, 2021 @ 01:50 PM

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The tragic events of the past year has brought an increased awareness to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). As a result, healthcare organizations are hiring Chief Diversity Officers (CDO’s), implementing initiatives, providing educational programs, and using new recruitment strategies to increase diversity in medicine.

Increasing diversity in healthcare organizations benefits both the healthcare provider and the patient populations they serve.

To increase diversity and lower racial healthcare disparities, many hospitals and health systems are looking to their CDO for guidance moving forward.

Last year, CDO hires grew by 84%, making it the fastest growing C-suite title, according to LinkedIn.

Some health systems are going beyond hiring a CDO and are creating entire teams or councils to implement and foster best practices. 

Northwell Health formed the Emerging Leaders Diversity & Inclusion Council which is responsible for analyzing current conditions within the health system while seeking to implement best practices in 3 key areas:

• Onboarding
• Mentoring
• Succession Planning

Englewood Health assembled a Diversity and Inclusion Education Council consisting of 12 team members across all departments and leadership levels.  

Warren Geller, President and CEO of Englewood Health said, “Our country’s history of racism and current inequalities have impacted every aspect of life and, most importantly, our health and well-being. With the establishment of a Diversity and Inclusion Education Council we are committing to doing more and doing better for the communities we serve.”

More hospitals are providing educational resources and training programs for their staff members.

At Ochsner Health in Louisiana, they’ve rolled out training to address implicit bias across the organization. Melissa Love, VP of Professional Staff Services and The Office of Professional Well-Being said, “People are really curious. I’m seeing people be very surprised by their lack of knowledge, even those that think they’re very knowledgeable.” 

Hospitals are also participating in evaluation programs to help improve their DEI efforts. 

The HRC Foundation's Healthcare Equality Index (HEI) evaluates healthcare facilities nationwide based on non-discrimination & staff training, LGBTQ patient services & support, employee benefits & policies, and LGBTQ patient & community engagement. 

Last year, a record 765 healthcare facilities participated in the HEI survey. These organizations recognize the importance of implementing LGBTQ-inclusive practices alongside their foundational non-discrimination policies.

When it comes to diversifying the hiring process, Daniel Benavides, Manager of Talent Acquisition at CHG Healthcare, suggests hospitals increase the number of people who select candidates. 

Benavides noticed only one or two people were filtering candidates for interviews. He determined that having a larger mix of individuals looking at applications would result in a greater diversity — and higher quality — of selected candidates.

It’s critical healthcare organizations improve diversity within their staff to reduce healthcare disparities. They must ensure ALL people are equally represented. 

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Topics: Diversity and Inclusion, chief diversity officer, hospital diversity, diversity recruitment, healthcare organizations, workplace diversity, hiring diverse workforce, diversity and inclusion in the workplace, DEI

Frontier Nursing University Endows Scholarship Aimed at Increasing Diversity in Health Care

Posted by Frontier Nursing University

Tue, May 18, 2021 @ 12:10 PM

FNU logoVersailles, Ky. – Frontier Nursing University has endowed a new scholarship to support African American, Black, Native American, and Alaskan Native students. The scholarship, which will support 10 students per year, was established and approved by FNU’s Board of Directors during their quarterly meeting in April 2021.

The scholarship is in keeping with the University’s mission, which is “to provide accessible nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education to prepare competent, entrepreneurial, ethical, and compassionate leaders in primary care to serve all individuals with an emphasis on women and families in diverse, rural, and underserved populations.” The University’s focus on diverse, rural, and underserved populations is in response to the persistent health care disparities in the United States. 

“While our other endowed scholarships are needed by and available to students of all backgrounds, this particular scholarship is in direct response to the health disparities for the designated groups,” FNU President Dr. Susan Stone said. “Data demonstrates that culturally concordant care improves health care outcomes, which is why we have made increasing the diversity of the health care workforce a strategic priority at FNU.” 

A November 2020 study published by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that, among women with a college education or higher, Black women have a pregnancy-related mortality rate that is over five times higher than that of White women. The pregnancy-related mortality rate for Black women with a completed college education or higher is 1.6 times higher than the rate for White women with less than a high school diploma. 

Disparities are also prevalent elsewhere. A 2019 report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) found that non-Hispanic Black persons were more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic or Pacific Islander persons to die of heart disease in 2017. Similarly, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported that, in 2018,  American Indians and Alaska Natives were 50 percent more likely to be diagnosed with coronary heart disease than their white counterparts. The CDC also shared a report that found that 34% of COVID-19 deaths were among non-Hispanic Black people, though this group accounts for only 12% of the total U.S. population. 

“Diversity, equity, and inclusion have been a top priority at FNU for more than a decade,” FNU Board Chair Dr. Michael Carter said. “Not only do we know that these DEI initiatives are the right thing to do ethically, but the data clearly indicates that a well-prepared, diverse health care workforce is vital to improve medical outcomes for all people. The decision to endow this scholarship was data-driven and in direct alignment with the mission of the University.”

To establish this scholarship, FNU will designate $2.5 million to provide $100,000 in scholarships per year. This will be used to deliver ten $10,000 scholarships annually. Additionally, the fund will grow over time from investment and ongoing fundraising targeted for scholarships.

The new scholarship joins a comprehensive list of financial support for FNU’s students. Through the generosity of its supporters and donors, FNU will provide nearly $500,000  in endowed scholarships to students in 2021. 

“These scholarships are particularly important because, on average, despite our comparatively low tuition rates, many of our students graduate with nearly $60,000 in student loan debt,” Dr. Stone said. “Through awareness, fundraising efforts, and scholarships, we are committed to helping alleviate that burden. We want our graduates to be able to fully focus on being essential healthcare providers in their communities. However, due to the startling health outcomes for these specific groups, we knew we needed to address the needs of these particular students.” 

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About Frontier Nursing University:

The mission of FNU is to provide accessible nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education to prepare competent, entrepreneurial, ethical, and compassionate leaders in primary care to serve all individuals with an emphasis on women and families in diverse, rural, and underserved populations. FNU offers graduate Nurse-Midwifery and Nurse-Practitioner distance education programs that can be pursued full- or part-time with the student’s home community serving as the classroom. Degrees and options offered include Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), or Post-Graduate Certificates. To learn more about FNU and the programs and degrees offered, please visit Frontier.edu.

Topics: scholarship, Frontier Nursing University, diversity scholarship, Diversity in Health Care

Creative Ways Hospitals Are Supporting Nurses Mental Health

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, May 12, 2021 @ 02:41 PM

nursestressBefore the COVID-19 pandemic, Nursing was known to be a stressful profession. There was plenty of data showing burnout to be a significant problem among US Nurses.

With increasing stress placed on front line Nurses during this pandemic, hospitals are investing in initiatives and programs to support the mental health of these employees.

Mount Sinai Health System, created recharge rooms for healthcare workers. Dr. Putrino and his team created multi-sensory experiences that can reduce stress in just 15 minutes. These rooms are filled with faux plants and candles, illuminated with calming lights and one wall displays relaxing scenes and sounds. Slider5-Episode38-Recharge-750x400Putrino said, "Listen, what we need is a space or a series of spaces where our healthcare workers can sit down and for just a moment have a lot of their stress just relieved and taken away from them."

Stony Brook Medicine used a similar idea when creating a respite room called "Resilience at the Brook." The large, peaceful area features plants, calming wall art, a pod for private mediation, and relaxing materials, such as coloring books and miniature Zen gardens, to help employees rejuvenate. Employees can also add encouraging messages and quotes to inspire each other on the Motivation Mural Wall.

CharminOhio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) Stress, Trauma and Resilience (STAR) Program uses the Buckeye Paws program. A group of certified therapy dogs visit to provide comfort and emotional support to healthcare staff.

Emily Fawcett, R.N., a float Nurse on all floors at Lenox Hill hospital, started "hope huddles." Hope huddles are held at the beginning of shift changes and Nurses gather together to share news of patients recovering and other inspiring, and even humorous, stories.

Cody Regional Health created a wellness area for employees. The new space, staffed 24/7, includes a meditation room, eight bedrooms with private bathrooms, laundry and shower facilities, on-site access to licensed therapists for emotional support, puzzles and games, and an exercise area to meet employees’ needs.

Elise Phelan, a surgical unit Charge Nurse at UCHealth created the Resilience Program. Phelan would bring in massage therapists, movement therapists, yoga instructors, nutritionists and sometimes therapy puppies.

Code Lavender began in 2008 with Earl Bakken at North Hawaii Community Hospital. Calling the code signals to the Code Lavender team that an individual or group of individuals are in need of emergency psychological assistance.

Many hospitals like Cleveland Clinic have started implementing this code. The Code Lavender team usually comprises representatives from the spiritual care and healing services departments, and other hospital-based support services (such as employee assistance, music therapy, wellness, the ethics consultation service, and art therapy), and volunteers.
Code-Lavender

Bayhealth offers staff Code Lavender Kits. Kits include a back massager, aromatherapy inhalers, LED candles, a sound machine, Code Lavender journals, and a tote to store everything in.

It's very clear there is a need for this kind of support and innovation. The well-being and morale of front line workers should remain a top priority even after the pandemic.

Topics: mental health, mental health nursing, front line workers mental health, mental health support programs, nurses mental health

Companies Celebrating Nurses Week With Giveaways

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, May 05, 2021 @ 03:21 PM

thankyouThe COVID-19 pandemic has shone a light on the incredible role Nurses play in keeping humanity safe and healthy. Nurses Week runs from May 6th through May 12th and companies are taking this time to show their great appreciation for these heroes. We compiled a list of companies offering discounts and freebies to Nurses this week!

1. Amazon Books

Amazon is offering four free medical drama books, available to read on your Kindle E-readers, Fire tablets and the free Kindle app.

2. Insomnia Cookies

All Nurses (anyone with Nurse in their job title) get 1 FREE 6-pack of Classic cookies w/ANY in-store purchase OR 1 FREE Classic cookie (no purchase required) all week-long!

3. Chipotle

Chipotle is offering free burritos to all the hard-working, extra-shift-taking lifesavers who put the care in healthcare.

4. Dunkin’

Dunkin' is showing their appreciation and support to Nurses with a free medium hot or iced coffee.

5. BIGGBY COFFEE

On May 6th BIGGBY COFFEE is offering Nurses a free 16 oz beverage of their choice and free Nurses retractable badge clip. 

6. Zaxby's

On May 6th Zaxby's is offering Nurses a BOGO Big Zax Snak Meal.

7. Puffy

Puffy wants all healthcare professionals to enjoy better sleep with this extra special discount of $375 off any Puffy mattress and 2 free pillows.

8. ASICS Shoes

ASICS is offering Nurses a discount of 40% off all full-priced products in their online store.

9. Caesars Rewards

Caesars Rewards is offering Nurses 35% discounts on hotel reservations.

10. Rental Cars

Nurses can receive a 25% discount on their rental car purchase from Budget, Enterprise, and National.

 

Happy Nurses Week and thank you for everything you do!

Topics: National Nurses Week, Nurses Week, thank you nurses

2021 Top 10 Shoes For Nurses

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Apr 21, 2021 @ 03:15 PM

Since Nurses spend so much time on their feet, they need durable shoes that can provide ultimate comfort and support. From sneakers to slip ons, here is a list of the best shoes for Nurses this year!

1. Hoka One One Arahi 4

hoka

2. adidas Men's Ultraboost

ultraboost

3. Alegria Debra Professional

alegria

4. Crocs Bistro Clog

bistro

 

5. The Cloud

cloud

6. Clove Shoe

clove

7. Dansko Professional Clog

dansko

8. New Balance Women's 411 V1 Walking Shoe

new balance

9. Dansko Paisley Sneaker

paisley

10. Brooks Levitate 4

brooks

 

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Topics: nurse, nurses, shoes for nurses, top nurse shoes, nurse shoes, best shoes for nurses, nursing shoes

Primary Care Physician Shortage Creating High Demand For Nurse Practitioners

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Tue, Apr 13, 2021 @ 12:04 PM

npResearch shows there has been a steady decrease of Physicians across the United States, especially primary care Physicians.

The data published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects shortfalls in primary care Physicians of between 21,400 and 55,200 by 2033.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports, 80 million Americans lack adequate access to primary care, primarily in rural areas.

Nurse Practitioners (NPs) have the ability to help fill this void.

The number of NPs is at a record high and the demand is growing. According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), in 2019, there were more than 290,000 licensed NPs in the United States.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports, the overall employment of Nurse Practitioners is projected to grow 45% from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.

AANP data also shows 89.7% of Nurse Practitioners are prepared to practice in primary care with specialties in family (65.4%), adult (12.6%), pediatrics (3.7%), women’s health (2.8%), and gerontology (1.7%), among other specialties.

However, many states still impose restrictions on the care NPs can provide.

Some states require NPs to be supervised by a Physician and other states restrict NPs from practicing a certain distance from their supervising Physicians.

NPs can prescribe medications and controlled substances, but a few states require they do so in collaboration with a supervising Physician. Some states also impose probationary periods before NPs are allowed to prescribe medications.

Nurse Practitioners should be able to work to the full potential of their education and training.

Patients trust the care they receive from Nurses. Evidence supports the notion that NPs provide care that is comparable to Physicians in terms of quality, utilization, and satisfaction.

AANP President Sophia Thomas, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, FAANP said, “An estimated 1.06 billion patient visits were made to NPs in 2018, improving the health of our nation and increasing the growing number of patients who say, ‘We Choose NPs.’”

As of March 2021, the average Nurse Practitioner salary is $111,478. Pay varies depending on education, certifications, the state you work in, additional skills, and the number of years in the field.

Nurse Practitioners are a critical resource for improving population health and reducing health disparities.

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Topics: nurse practitioners, NPs, high demand for Nurse Practitioners, physician shortage

Registered Nurse Salaries By State

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Apr 07, 2021 @ 02:02 PM

malenurse14According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) survey, the average annual salary for Registered Nurses in the U.S. is $80,010.

Here is the list of average annual salaries for Registered Nurses by state.

1. California: $120,560

2. Hawaii: $104,830

3. Massachusetts: $96,250

4. Oregon: $96,230

5. Alaska: $95,270

6. Washington: $91,310

7. New York: $89,760

8. Nevada: $89,750

9. New Jersey: $85,720

10. Connecticut: $84,850

11. Rhode Island: $82,790

12. Maryland: $81,590

13. Minnesota: $80,960

14. Arizona: $80,380

15. Colorado: $77,860

16. Texas: $76,800

17. New Hampshire: $75,970

18. New Mexico: $75,700

19. Wisconsin: $74,760

20. Illinois: $74,560

21. Virginia: $74,380

22. Delaware: $74,330

23. Pennsylvania: $74,170

24. Michigan: $73,980

25. Wyoming: $72,600

26. Vermont: $72,140

27. Idaho: $71,640

28. Georgia: $71,510

29. Maine: $71,040

30. Montana: $70,530

31. Utah: $70,370

32. Ohio: $69,750

33. North Dakota: $69,630

34. Florida: $69,510

35. Nebraska: $69,480

36. North Carolina: $68,950

37. Louisiana: $68,010

38. Indiana: $67,490

39. South Carolina: $67,140

40. Oklahoma: $66,600

41. Missouri: $65,900

42. West Virginia: $65,130

43. Kentucky: $64,730

44. Kansas: $64,200

45. Tennessee: $64,120

46. Arkansas: $63,640

47. Iowa: $62,570

48. Mississippi: $61,250

49. South Dakota: $60,960

50. Alabama: $60,230

Topics: RN Salary, registered nurse salaries, RN salaries

The Importance of Race and Ethnicity COVID Vaccine Data

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Apr 05, 2021 @ 10:59 AM

vaccine1For the last year, health experts have pleaded for better data to shed light on disproportionate rates of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths among communities of color.

Since the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, health care organizations like the American Medical Association (AMA), American Nurses Association (ANA) and the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) have been asking for more race and ethnicity vaccine data.

This important data is missing for half of coronavirus vaccine recipients. According to the CDC, the data from 52,614,231 people fully vaccinated, Race/Ethnicity was available for 28,234,374 (53.7%).

This data is imperative in ensuring an equitable response to a pandemic that continues to disproportionately affect these vulnerable populations.

“Race and ethnicity data provides critical information to clinicians, health care organizations, public health agencies and policymakers, allowing them to equitably allocate resources across all communities, evaluate health outcomes and improve quality of care and delivery of public health services,” says the open letter, sent by the AMA, APhA and the ANA.

Equitable distribution of vaccines is crucial. When states collect this information, it helps officials identify large racial gaps so they can find better ways to distribute shots.

North Carolina is leading the way in data collection. The state now has racial and ethnicity data for more than 98% of vaccine recipients.

To achieve this high rate of collection, a state-mandated software system was used which requires providers to record a person’s race and ethnicity in order to register them for a vaccination.

“The data is not just a nice-to-have, it’s a need-to-have in order to embed equity into every aspect of our response and now into vaccine operations,” says Mandy Cohen, secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

"Communities should be able to generate daily and certainly weekly data to understand the demographics of who is being vaccinated. Local health departments and health institutions need to respond to these data in real time to identify where COVID-19 vaccine uptake is not matching COVID-19 disease burden," said Dr. Muriel Jean-Jacques, Northwestern University Department of Medicine vice chair of diversity, equity and inclusion, and Dr. Howard C. Bauchner of the Boston University School of Medicine, a professor of pediatrics and community health.

Many barriers make it difficult to access the vaccine.

People from hard hit communities often have limited access to digital tools needed to schedule an appointment. And often information about vaccine registration is only available in English.

States that partner with community-based organizations are administering the vaccine more equitably than others, said Rita Carreón, vice president of health at UnidosUS, a civil rights organization for Hispanic communities.

The lack of race and ethnicity data in health systems didn’t begin with this pandemic. For years, health experts have been pleading for better health data to reduce racial health disparities.

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Topics: CDC, vaccines, racial health disparities, pandemic, covid-19 vaccine data, race and ethnicity data, covid-19 vaccine

Ageism in Healthcare

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Mar 29, 2021 @ 11:13 AM

ageismAge discrimination involves treating an applicant or employee less favorably because of his or her age, defined by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) forbids age discrimination against people who are age 40 or older.

Ageism in the Workplace

According to a 2018 AARP survey, about 3 in 5 older workers have seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace. Also 76% of these older workers see age discrimination as a hurdle to finding a new job.

A diverse workplace is fundamental in providing the best patient care possible. But age is usually left out of an organization's Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) strategy.

Patients feel more comfortable talking with a Nurse who understands and can relate to them and their issues. Nurses who understand what ageing patients are going through can provide better care. 

Some Nurses over the age of 40 experience ageism from employers, fellow staff members, and even patients. Examples of this type of ageism include:

Physical Strength - There is a perception older Nurses aren't physically strong enough to handle certain responsibilities such as restraining a combative patient or assisting someone into a bed or wheelchair.

Technology - Another misconception is older Nurses can't keep up with the changing technologies and medications.

Pay - An article by Arkansas State University discusses salary-based ageism in Nursing saying, "As Nurses accumulate experience, they also accumulate pay increases. As a result, employers sometimes discriminate against more experienced Nurses by hiring or promoting younger, less experienced, and therefore, less expensive Nurses."

This type of stereotyping and discrimination often leads to poor morale, job dissatisfaction, burnout and early retirement.

How You Can Reduce Ageism at Work

To combat ageism in healthcare organizations, there should be DEI policies that include a focus on age.

According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) the EEOC recommends organizations follow these strategies:

  • Assess your organization's culture, practices or policies that may reveal outdated assumptions about older workers. The Center on Aging & Work at Boston College and AARP partnered to develop an assessment tool.
  • Examine your recruitment practices. Does your website include photos of an age-diverse workforce? Do your job applications ask for age-related information such as date of birth or when a person graduated? Is your interview panel age-diverse? Train recruiters and interviewers to avoid ageist assumptions.
  • Include age as part of your diversity and inclusion programs and efforts. Offer learning and development, including anti-bias training and courses.
  • Foster a multi-generational culture that recognizes ability regardless of age and rejects age stereotypes, just as it would reject stereotypes involving race, disability, national origin, religion or sex.

Ageism in Your Patient Population

Ageist stereotypes and discrimination are also barriers to health equality for this patient population.

An article from Lippincott Nursing Center states, Older adults represent 13% of the total population in the United States, but account for over 40% of U.S. hospitalizations.

Ageism can negatively affect the care older adults receive. It's often healthcare providers attribute signs and symptoms of illness to normal aging, missing important indicators that need to be addressed.

A lot of ageist behaviors may not be intentional and will take conscious efforts to identify and change. For example, talking slowly and loudly, or assuming someone can’t comprehend what you are telling them, is common behavior around older patients and is considered ageism.

How You Can Reduce Ageist Attitudes Toward Patients

The Alliance for Aging Research warned "that unless ageist attitudes are recognized and rooted out of our healthcare system, the next generation of Americans under Medicare, the largest generation in U.S. history, will likely suffer inadequate care."

The Alliance released recommendations to address the problem of ageism:

  • More training and education for healthcare professionals in the field of geriatrics.
  • Greater inclusion of older Americans in clinical trials.
  • Utilization of appropriate screening and preventive measures for older Americans.
  • Empowerment and education of older patients.

The older patient population deserves the same quality care and attention as younger patients. Organizations must acknowledge ageism as an obstacle in providing the best care possible and take action to make healthcare more equitable and inclusive.

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Topics: Diversity and Inclusion, age discrimination in healthcare, DEI, ageism, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

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