DiversityNursing Blog

Tips For New Nurses

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Thu, Dec 07, 2017 @ 09:41 AM

4-Tips-for-Night-Shift-Nurses-To-Stay-Alert-and-Happy.jpg

It can be difficult making the transition from Nursing student to professional. So we’ve put together a list of tips to help you during the first few months and set yourself up for a successful career. If you have any other tips you think we should add to our list, please leave a comment below!

Give yourself a chance to acclimate to shift work. 

There's a good chance you are going to be tired during the first few weeks of your shifts. Don't worry hang in there, it will get better once you're adjusted to the hours. But if you are continually fatigued and don’t see improvement after a few weeks, talk to your hospital wellness team or your supervisor to discuss some solutions.

Don’t be so hard on yourself if you make an error

Every new Nurse makes mistakes. Please don’t set that unrealistic expectation that you’ll just do it right the first time, every time. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself very disappointed in yourself, when in actuality it’s normal to make mistakes and learn from them.

Become efficient at charting

You've probably heard this a thousand times by now.  I will say it again anyway, it is worth repeating.  You absolutely MUST chart everything you do. Be careful not to chart only what was verbalized.  Wait for the orders to be placed and then document accordingly. 

Use a Mentor

If you work with a Nurse whom you admire and is simply awesome at what they do, you can watch them quietly and learn from how they go about their work. This is a silent mentoring relationship where you just learn through association and observation.

If that isn’t your style, Nurse.com recomends you actually verbalize your wish for a mentor to the Nurse in question. This could involve setting up a regular meeting for you to ask questions and receive coaching, or it could be more of an informal, as-needed arrangement.

Don't be afraid to ask questions

If you act like you know everything (which isn't possible) then you won't ever learn anything. Nurses ask lots of questions all the time, it is a constant learning process. No one expects you to know everything.

Any experienced Nurses have tips to add for new Nurses?  What helped you in your first year after Nursing school? Comment below!

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Topics: new nurses, new nurse

Can you offer some advice on getting a job for an RN who has been licensed for 2 years, but who has worked as an RN for only 2 months?

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Mon, Apr 07, 2014 @ 01:38 PM

Source: Nurse.com
Question:

Dear Donna, 

I have been an RN for two years, but have worked for only a couple of months because I got sick. No one wants to hire me without experience. My credentials are perfect. I reside in Florida and cannot relocate because I am a mother of small children. Can you offer some advice?

Wants to Work 

Dear Donna replies:

Dear Wants to Work,

Don't be discouraged. The job market is shifting and changing. Even though you are not a new nurse, read “New nurse, new job strategies” to see what's happening and learn creative ways to market yourself (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/Strategies).

You should start volunteering as a nurse while you continue to look for paid employment. Volunteering is a great way to gain recent relevant experience, to hone old skills and learn new ones, build confidence and expand your professional network. Plus, volunteering often leads to paid employment as it is a way to get your foot in the door somewhere. Look for opportunities at your local public health department, a free clinic, the American Red Cross, a cancer care center or a blood bank. 

You also should attend local chapter meetings of the Florida Nurses Association (www.floridanurses.org). You do not have to be a member of ANA/FNA to attend meetings as a guest. This is a great way to reconnect to your profession, get up to date on issues and trends and further expand your network. Networking is well known to be a great way to find and get a job.

When what you're doing isn't working, it's time to try a new approach. You will be able to find work. You'll just have to look in new directions for employment and use a new approach to find and get those jobs. Persistence and determination will always win out in the end.

Best wishes,
Donna 

Topics: help, work, new nurse, Ask Donna, RN

The top 10 things you’ve learned on the job

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Jan 17, 2014 @ 10:10 AM

BY 

describe the imageThe day has finally come: You’ve graduated from nursing school, passed the NCLEX and finally landed your dream job. Now comes the tough/awesome/rewarding part—actually working as a nurse!

When you’re just starting out, it can be tough to know who to listen to and what advice is actually relevant to you. So we asked our Facebook fans for the number-one thing they’ve learned on the job as nurses. Check out their smart, funny and inspiring responses—then let us know what you’d add to the list.

The top 10 things you’ve learned on the job

1. Never pass up an opportunity to eat or pee.
—Sylvia Moose Garza

2. You can have a nurse title if you pass state boards, but you can only be a real nurse by having empathy, compassion and treating your patients as individuals—not room numbers or bed numbers. They are humans with their own souls.
—Vicky Kelly

3. If it’s open, it could squirt.
—Melissa Thomas Goodson

4. Never underestimate the value of listening to a patient and their troubles for a few minutes. Sometimes your ear can make all the difference in somebody’s day, year, situation or sleepless night.
—Diane Byrne

5. Nursing is 10 percent skill and 90 percent communication.
—Becky Peters Lay

6. Stay calm and don’t panic—98 percent of what you do can’t kill or hurt anyone (I got this piece of advice from a 35-year vet nurse who was my proctor on my first day!).
—Anne Marie Dzmura

7. Never, never, ever assume ANYTHING!
—Demita Crofford

8. A little teamwork goes a long way!
—Kacy Elisha Holland

9. Always be an advocate. Never be afraid to speak up for your patients’ best interest!
—Monica Springhart

10. Don’t take life for granted. Stop and smell the roses. Enjoy the simple things, like the ability to take a shower or the human touch.
—Kendra Ringuette Jenkins

What’s the number-one lesson you’ve learned as a nurse?

Source: Scrubs Mag

Topics: new nurse, advice, nursing school, learn on the job

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