DiversityNursing Blog

Nursing Specializations

Posted by Pat Magrath

Tue, Aug 23, 2016 @ 10:39 AM

870423026.jpgIf you are a Nursing student wondering what Specialty is right for you, please read on. Perhaps you’re an Experienced Nurse thinking about changing your area of focus. If so, this article is for you too. We hope you find it helpful!

The nursing profession has evolved considerably over the last century, including the introduction of specializations for nurses, with specific knowledge and experience to practice in certain fields. There are now many possible areas that a nurse may choose to specialize in, and these continue to grow.

Some of these are covered in more detail below, although there are more beyond this list.

Advanced Practice Registered Nursing

Advanced practice registered nurses have acquired more advanced skills and knowledge through a master’s degree program, in addition to the undergraduate degree to become a registered nurse.

This extended training distinguishes them from other nurses and they often go on to work as a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), nurse practitioner (NP), nurse anesthetist (CNA), or certified nurse-midwife.

 

 

Ambulatory Care Nursing

Ambulatory care nurses provide health services to patients directly in an environment outside of a hospital, wherever it is required. They are responsible for following treatment plans for acute conditions, monitoring signs, communicating with the patient and their family, and promoting overall patient health.

 

 

Cardiac Nursing

Cardiac nurses care for patients with cardiovascular disease or health problems related to the heart and have specialized knowledge in this area. They are responsible for monitoring signs, treating symptoms, addressing clinical needs, and providing relevant support and education to the patient and their family.

 

 

Case Management Nurse

Case management nurse care for patients who require ongoing support and work to develop and implement a treatment plan that aims to stabilize health and minimize hospitalization.

 

 

Critical Care Nursing

Critical care nurses work with patients who are critically ill or injured and require close monitoring and care. They are responsible for looking after patients with potentially fatal conditions and following the treatment care plan for the best outcomes.

 

 

Dialysis Nursing

Dialysis nurses care for patients who require dialysis as part of their treatment plan, such as those with kidney disease. They are responsible for monitoring signs and progress, administering medications, and providing support and advice to patients throughout the process. They may work in a hospital, clinic, or provide in-home care.

Genetics Nursing

Genetic nurses care for patients with a genetic disease and have in-depth knowledge about the role of genetic in the pathology of these conditions. They are responsible for conducting family risk assessments, analyzing genetic data, researching genetic diseases, and providing support to affected individuals and families.

Geriatric Nursing

Geriatric nurses care for elderly patients and have a thorough understanding of the health and treatment of conditions that commonly affect the elderly. Geriatric nurses often specialize further, to care for elderly patients with a specific health condition.

Mental Health Nursing

Mental health nurses, also known as psychiatric nurses, care for patients with mental health, psychiatric, or behavioral disorders. They help to provide support to these patients and their families while they recover.

Neonatal Nursing

Neonatal nurses care for young infants in the first few weeks of their life and have specialized knowledge about how to take care of infants and the conditions that may affect them.

Oncology Nursing

Oncology nurses care for patients who have cancer. They help in the treatment and monitoring of the disease, in addition to providing support and education to patients and their families.

Pediatric Nursing

Pediatric nurses care for young children and their families. They have specialized knowledge about the function of young bodies and the health conditions that may affect them and assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of these patients.

Other Specializations

There are many possible fields that a nurse may choose to specialize in, including:

  • Gastroenterology nursing
  • Holistic nursing
  • Medical-surgical nursing
  • Midwifery nursing
  • Neuroscience nursing
  • Obstetrical nursing
  • Occupational health nursing
  • Orthopedic nursing
  • Ostomy nursing

 

Have questions about changing your area of focus or maybe you have a general question, just ask one of our Nurse Leaders. 
Click Here To Ask Question

Topics: nursing specialty

The Difficult Decisions of an ER Nurse

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Wed, Jul 24, 2013 @ 11:45 AM

by Angela Stevens

I’ve known a few ER nurses over the years, and all of them have told me that, no matter how much training they have had, how their teachers and textbooks tried to prepare them, and even how much experience in other fields of nursing…nothing prepared them for the reality of working in an emergency room. When choosing any nursing specialty, it is important to test drive the environment before making a final decision. This can easily be accomplished by taking a position as a traveling nurse and visiting different areas of the country as well as different nursing environments. In fact, one of the girls I went to high school with did this, and she found her great love was in pediatrics. Janey, the friend who became a pediatric nurse, actually did a stint in an emergency room for several months and told me some of the hardest things she had ever had to do occurred during that time. Don’t get me wrong, she said that the heartbreak in pediatrics could be excruciating, but that – more often than not – it was a happier place to be.

sunbelt-er-nurse

One of the difficulties she faced in the emergency room was not being able to make a personal connection with the patients. She was with them for only a brief period of time, usually a few hours, before they were discharged or sent to another floor of the hospital. She rarely found out what happened to the patients, even those she felt a connection to. Being able to move on to the next patient and distance yourself from previous patients is difficult. Another difficulty of being an emergency room nurse comes when there are more patients than there are people available to help them. At this point, the nurses, usually the first to see and evaluate a patient, have to decide who is in the most critical condition and get them to see a doctor. Making the decision of who gets medical treatment first was overwhelming for many of the nurses I knew, at least initially. One told me that she finally realized that, the more quickly she was able to make her assessment, the faster everyone would receive the care they needed. This is what stopped her from “hemming and hawing,” as she put it, and put on her decision making cap. While it was true she had to leave some patients in the waiting room who were miserable, they were seen as quickly as she could process those with more pressing conditions. Seeing it in this light made perfect sense to me, and it made me realize that, when I visit the emergency room as a patient, it isn’t that the nurses don’t care. Quite the opposite, really; sometimes they may care too much. I now know that if I’m waiting, there is usually someone with a much more serious problem who is receiving care.

Why did you, or do you want to, become an ER nurse? How has it changed your perspective?

Source: Sunbelt Staffing 

Topics: challenges, ER nurse, nursing specialty

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