DiversityNursing Blog

A Nurse And A Gentleman

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Wed, Dec 28, 2016 @ 12:54 PM

Male_Nurse1.jpgEducational systems should be increasing the diversity of its students to create a workforce that is prepared to meet the demands of diverse populations. Since the 70's there has been an increase of male Nurses by 200%. Stereotypes of professional gender rolls are being broken down.
 
The student-led group MEN, follows in the footsteps of AAMN the American Assembly for Men in Nursing. The group is open to all genders and their goals are to empower male Nursing students, promote awareness and cultural competence, and advocate growth and development. In doing so, MEN will help lead the change.
 
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“It does not make a thing good, that it is remarkable that a woman should do it. Neither does it make a thing bad, which would have been good had a man done it ...”

— FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE, 1859

The preceding quote is the second-to-last sentence of Nightingale’s famous book. Her allusion to the equality between sexes looks as if it has been added as an afterthought. In the discussion about men in nursing, her ideas may seem portentous, but it is doubtful if she ever imagined that men would be infiltrating the field.

The number of male nurses and men enrolling in nursing programs are at all-time high. According to the US Census Bureau in 2013, the latest figures show that approximately 9.6% of nurses in 2011 are male compared with 2.7% in the 1970s—representing a more than 200% increase. At our College, about 10% of advanced practice students and 14% undergraduate students were male during the school years 2014 to 2016. Eight of the full-time faculty are male—or 11%. Nationwide, enrollment of men in entry-level nursing programs remains stable at about 15% since 2012. It is likely that these numbers will increase in the next decade as more media attention is given to the reality of nursing as a viable and rewarding profession for men and women alike.

Enter — MEN.

The student-led interest group MEN came about in 2009 when a group of male students sent out a call for anyone who identified as male to gather and brainstorm about establishing a student activity group.

In its by-laws, MEN adopted the objectives of the American Assembly for Men in Nursing (AAMN) as its core purpose. These goals include:

To empower male nursing students to be responsible for their holistic health and well-being in order to serve as role models in the community.

To promote awareness of health related issues affecting the male population by addressing their unique health challenges.

  • To promote cultural competence among all its members to recognize the male perspective of nursing.

  • To advocate for the growth and development of its members as leaders in nursing and in society through education, outreach, advocacy, and service.
 
Throughout each school year, MEN organizes and collaborates with other student groups to provide high quality extracurricular programming to not just meet its educational mission, but to promote comradery and mutual support among male students in the program. Some of the more recent events hosted by MEN include bike rides and indoor rock climbing, résumé writing and interviewing skills, men’s health awareness campaigns and fundraising, alumni networking, picnics, and presentations on various clinical topics of interest.

While the group’s purpose relates to men in the nursing profession, MEN is open to students of all genders, with some of its executive board members in the past being female. One significant outcome of the group is that several key MEN alumni established New York City Men in Nursing, an official chapter of AAMN.

The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health

While many health professions are becoming more gender-balanced, the nursing workforce has remained predominantly female. The impact of the increasing number of men entering nursing is still emerging and not yet fully understood. Other countries have long established policies to deal with instructional and practice variations based on religious restrictions. For example, in a nursing school in Oman, male students are not allowed in maternity wards. High-fidelity simulation offers male students the “hands-on” experience in labor and delivery.

One important consideration in the slowly increasing gender diversity in nursing education is for faculty to be aware of the well known gendered characteristics in learning, while keeping in mind that every individual is unique. Gendered differences is a potential topic for nursing education researchers.

Career Trajectories of Male Nursing Students

Hospitals remain the largest employer of all registered nurses, with 63.2% providing inpatient and outpatient care in a hospital setting. Staff nurse—or its equivalent—is the most common job title of RNs in the US. However, there is no comprehensive data on current career choices of male nurses. Older data indicated more men work at hospitals in proportion to the number of female RNs.

What is certain today is that the highest representation by men in all fields of nursing practice is in nurse anesthesia. The US Census Bureau reported that 41% of all Certified Registered Nurses Anesthetist (CRNAs) are males. An online survey by Hodes Research in 2005 reported that the top three specialties reported by men were critical (27%), emergency (23%), and medical/surgical (20%). Awareness of the trend of career trajectories and aspirations of male nurses has important implications for nursing education and clinical stakeholders.

A Nurse and a Gentleman

Males are collectively called gentlemen, yet the virtue of gentleness, as a social construct, is mostly associated with women. Perhaps, it is one of the many reasons why it is especially pleasing to see men exemplify gentleness in a nursing role. What male nurses can offer to nursing is to breakdown the stereotypes of professional gender roles. Compassion, courage, good faith, and other virtues are all universal, and can be found among male and female nurses. At NYU Meyers, we believe in these values and are glad to see a growing number of men living them personally and professionally. 

by Fidelindo Lim, DNP, CCRN, and Larry Slater, PhD, RN, CNE Clinical Assistant Professors

 
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Topics: male nurse, men in healthcare, men in nursing, male nurses

What Male Nurses Want You To Know

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Mon, Jun 27, 2016 @ 02:33 PM

male-nurses2.jpgThe Nursing profession has traditionally been dominated by women, but more men are entering the field year after year as the dynamics of the healthcare industry change. According to a study by the U.S. Census Bureau, male participation in Nursing has tripled since 1970, and analysts predict this trend will continue as more men are encouraged to enter the profession. Because there are a lot of myths and misconceptions about males in Nursing, male Nurses want their patients, employers and colleagues to know more about them.
 
Male Nurses Love Their Jobs
One unfair, but unfortunately popular, myth is that males who go into Nursing do so because they couldn't get into medical school. This myth assumes that men belong as doctors and women belong as Nurses, but this idea is very outdated. Men who go into Nursing do so because they have a passion for medicine and for helping individuals and families in their care. Male Nurses aren't settling. They're doing what they love.
 
Men Have Compassion 
Society often views women as being the more compassionate gender, but men who enter the Nursing profession do so because they love to care for patients. Patients, doctors, and other Nurses should know that males who become Nurses are committed to providing the best possible care. Compassion for individuals and families is what Nursing is all about for both males and females.
 
Many Famous Nurses of History Were Male
St Camillus de Lellis, also known as the patron saint of Nursing, started the Camillian Order of Health Care Workers. Their big red cross, which would later be recognized as the international symbol for medical care, was worn by Nurses on the 17th century battlefield who attended to the injured. Walt Whitman, one of the most famous American poets, volunteered as a Nurse during the Civil War. In fact, more than 1 out of 3 Nurses in the military are men. 
 
Men Need Support
While it's true that men's participation in the Nursing profession is higher than ever, they still only represent around 10% of Nurses. Hospitals and other medical facilities realize that the diversity offered by men can improve the level of care they offer patients, but men often need to be encouraged to enter the field. The more support given to males in the industry, the more attractive the profession will look to potential male Nurses in the future. Males currently make up 13% of nursing school students, but that number could be a lot higher.
 
Whether you're a hospital manager, doctor, patient, or female Nurse, men in Nursing want you to know that their prepared for the challenges of the 21st Century healthcare industry. They're ready to work hard and have a true dedication to quality patient care. The more information people have about male Nurses, the more they will be welcome in a profession that has been traditionally ruled by women. 
 
 
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Topics: male nurses

Ohio State nursing program tries to shed female stereotype

Posted by Alycia Sullivan

Fri, Mar 01, 2013 @ 01:37 PM

By Hailey Fairchild

One of the most common stereotypes about the field of nursing is that it’s a female profession, but some students in Ohio State’s nursing program are hoping to defy that norm.

In popular films and television shows, such as “Nurse Betty,” “Pearl Harbor,” “Nurse Jackie”nurses or “HawthoRNe,” the main role of the nurse is played by a woman.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration found in its 2008 National Survey of the registered nurse population that of the more than 3 million licensed registered nurses living in the United States, only 6.6 percent were males.

Steven Shaw, a third-year in nursing and president of Buckeyes Assembly for Men and Nursing, believes being a nurse is a rewarding field for any individual, regardless of gender.

“Nursing is a very challenging, rewarding and highly marketable career choice,” Shaw said. “Nursing is constantly evolving and improving due to nursing research … the nurse gets to see the differences they make in their patient’s lives on a daily basis.”
And Shaw isn’t alone.

U.S. News & World Report listed registered nurse second on its 100 Best Jobs of 2013. U.S. News & World Report said the field is ranked highly because it’s rapidly expanding and nurses are in high demand.

The report said nursing has been one of the jobs that flourished despite the harsh economic times. The top-ranked job was dentistry.

Despite the growing number of people entering the nursing field and the high demand, the percentage of male nurses is still low.

“I do not understand why there is such a disparity between the number of men and women in the nursing field. It must be that a majority of males have a misconception about nursing,” Shaw said.

Jennifer Robb, coordinator for Diversity Recruitment and Retention at the College of Nursing, had similar thoughts on the subject.

“Traditionally it has been a female-dominated field. Part of my role is to increase the number of unrepresented students in nursing and often times when I contact high school counselors about it, they said, ‘OK, I will tell my girls about it.’ I just do not think the men are being exposed to it enough,” Robb said.

However, OSU has been praised for the number of male students it has in its program. In 2008, the American Assembly for Men in Nursing named OSU’s College of Nursing the Best Nursing College for Men. At the time only 10 percent of the undergraduate nursing students were male; however, that has risen to 14 percent in 2013, Robb said. The graduate program has also seen a big jump in the past five years, rising to 20 percent from 15 percent of the students being male, Robb said.

Even though percentages at OSU are greater than those nationally, the College of Nursing is still working to increase the diversity among students, especially the male population, Robb said. The College of Nursing Student Ambassadors have been reaching out to get new people to explore nursing.

“All throughout the year we do programs where students can come in and do hands-on activities and interact with some of our student ambassadors,” Robb said. “We work with elementary-age students, high school students and even college-age students.”
Andrew Bogart, a second-year in nursing, said society is becoming more accepting of having male nurses, and he feels right at home in Newton Hall, where the College of Nursing is housed.

“This year’s sophomore (class) in the College of Nursing has the largest percentage of male students in the history of the program. That’s exciting,” Bogart said. “There’s over 20 men in my class of about 160, so I don’t feel out of place atall.”

Source: The Latern                                                                                                  

Topics: Ohio State, male nurses, female nurse stereotype, breaking stereotypes

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