DiversityNursing Blog

Designer Thanks Nurses With Quarantine Art Project

Posted by Erica Bettencourt

Fri, Dec 11, 2020 @ 12:34 PM

moses

Rebecca Moses, the fashion designer and artist painted 46 portraits of Mount Sinai's Nurses and named the exhibition “Thank You, Mount Sinai Nurses.”.

The large-scale portraits can be seen at Mount Sinai’s Guggenheim Pavilion on upper Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

2020 is designated the Year of the Nurse and Midwife by the World Health Organization in honor of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale.

“To have all of our Nurses traumatized in the Year of The Nurse and not do anything about it, it was literally keeping me up at night,” Linda Valentino, the Vice President and Chief Nursing officer at Mount Sinai Health System said.

Rebecca Moses, mostly known for her fantastical and fashionable drawings teamed up with Ms. Valentino and Linda Levy, the President of the Fragrance Foundation and came up with the idea for the art project.

The designer would paint the Nurses' portraits and donate the original artworks to the hospital to be featured in an exhibition. Each Nurse would also receive a print. Linda Levy would donate 5,000 fragrance and beauty products, all filed under self-care, to those whose job is to care for others.

 

image1-1

 

After labor and delivery Nurse, Vanessa Joseph saw her portrait she said she was “blown away that someone paid attention to me and wanted to paint me. I’m just a Nurse.”

Joseph said, “Sometimes you feel like you’re in the trenches. We put on the full P.P.E. and no one can even recognize you anymore. I’m just trying to guess what Rebecca saw, and it’s so much life and vibrancy. It gives people hope that we’re going to get back to that again.”

Only women were chosen for this project, it's nothing personal against men. Moses simply stated “I don’t draw men. It’s not my strength. I love men, but I don’t draw them well.”

This is a thoughtful and remarkable collaboration to honor the Nurses at Mount Sinai. Nurses all over the world are going through an extremely challenging time. We applaud all efforts in recognizing the invaluable service, professionalism, and kindness all Nurses give every day. Thank you!

New Call-to-action

Topics: nurse art, thank you nurses, frontline workers, frontline healthcare workers, Mount Sinai, Rebecca Moses

Nurse Brings Smiles To Patients With His Dry-Erase Artwork

Posted by Pat Magrath

Thu, Apr 13, 2017 @ 11:53 AM

ht-erase-1-er-170412_4x3_992.jpgFor any of you who work with sick children, you know how emotionally and physically draining it is for your patients and their families. And… for you too. Anything that can bring comfort and a smile to everyone involved is more than welcome.
 
This article is about a very talented Nurse, who happens to be quite an artist as well. When he has a few minutes, he creates beautiful drawings that bring joy to all that see them. It might be a Disney character, a superhero, or a character from a book. It can take him a week or longer to finish each drawing, but I can imagine watching each drawing come to life, is exciting as well.

This nurse’s drawings are bringing cheer to his young patients at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas.

Edgar Palomo, 27, makes dry-erase artwork on the hematology/oncology floor to lighten the mood for the kids.

“I've always wanted to help people, which led me to nursing,” Palomo, who has been working at Cook Children’s for four years, wrote to ABC News. “I never wanted to pursue anything in art, so doing the drawings helps me to combine the two together in a positive and therapeutic manner.”

He said he’s been doing the drawings for the unit and patients for three years.

“As word of mouth goes around, it's gotten more frequent,” he explained of his elaborate creations. “I take requests from patients, families and staff. It can be a popular movie at the time or it might be something related to a holiday.”

ht-erase-2-er-170412_4x3_384.jpg

ht-erase-3-er-170412_4x3_992.jpg


ht-erase-5-er-170412_4x3_992.jpg

htersae-4-er-170412-_4x3_608.jpg

Each drawing takes a few hours to complete, although Palomo said, “My job comes first.”

“I can usually only work on the drawings a little bit at a time when I have some free time,” he said. “And there is not always downtime. Therefore, a drawing can take one to two weeks, depending on how busy the unit is.”

Palomo is happy that his attempt to bring some cheerful color to the floor “can have such a positive impact on the kids.”

“Anything to bring a smile is worth doing,” he said.

sign up for newsletter

Topics: nurse art, hospital art

Recent Jobs

Article or Blog Submissions

If you are interested in submitting content for our Blog, please ensure it fits the criteria below:
  • Relevant information for Nurses
  • Does NOT promote a product
  • Informative about Diversity, Inclusion & Cultural Competence

Agreement to publish on our DiversityNursing.com Blog is at our sole discretion.

Thank you

Subscribe to Email our eNewsletter

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all